• IP addresses are NOT logged in this forum so there's no point asking. Members are encouraged to install GOM or HOLA or TUNNELBEAR for an added layer of protection.

    The SEX forum is HERE so please stop asking.

LKY now lives in Auckland.....

virus

Alfrescian
Loyal
#25
What does old fart have to do with kiwiland? And this is nothing but a self masturbation article about the glories of kiwiland. If kiwiland so good..they will not be flooding into Ozland
prolly want to get seatless bike all this while to self fark becos of dishonorable son
 

winnipegjets

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
#30
Because I managed to save enough for my own retirement. If I depended on welfare payouts that are a pittance I would have been dead by now.
Precisely ...welfare payment is pittance ...just to help people to stay above water. So, it is unlikely a goal of Kiwis to live on welfare payments. Despite the high taxes, there are 2 million kiwis wanting to stay on. Something must be going right to keep them around.
 

Leongsam

Administrator
Admin
Loyal
#31
Precisely ...welfare payment is pittance ...just to help people to stay above water. So, it is unlikely a goal of Kiwis to live on welfare payments. Despite the high taxes, there are 2 million kiwis wanting to stay on. Something must be going right to keep them around.
Nothing is going right to keep them around. It's just that the majority are just like sinkies they complain all the time but don't have the guts or the determination to uproot and move to the unknown.
 

Truth_Hurts

Alfrescian
Loyal
#32
Nothing is going right to keep them around. It's just that the majority are just like sinkies they complain all the time but don't have the guts or the determination to uproot and move to the unknown.
Wat talking u? Heaps have already moved to Ozland n the airticket was bought by the N Z gahmen...
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Visa pathway for New Zealanders resident in Australia will cut migrant intake


Allowing NZ residents the skilled independent visa effectively crowds out applicants from other countries

Paul Karp

@Paul_Karp
Fri 13 Apr 2018 05.33 BSTLast modified on Fri 13 Apr 201806.21 BST

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A special pathway for New Zealandcitizens to apply for skilled migrant visas will shrink Australia’s immigration intake by allowing New Zealanders already resident in Australia to apply to remain permanently as migrants.

Malcolm Turnbull and Peter Dutton have been caught at odds this week about whether the home affairs minister canvassed reducing the permanent migration intake by 20,000 from the current limit of 190,000.

While the Turnbull government resolved to keep the cap at 190,000, a number of measures including the New Zealand pathway and an increase in support requirements making it harder for poorer migrant families to financially back their relatives in visa applications have contributed to a reduction in numbers.


The skilled independent subclass 189 visa, which was introduced in July 2017, is given to New Zealanders who have been Australian residents for five years and provides a pathway to citizenship after 12 months.

New figures from the home affairs departmentprovided to the ABCreveal that 1,512 of the visas had been issued by the end of February, with 7,500 applications still being processed.

New Zealand citizens can now visit, study, stay and work in Australia on temporary – but indefinite – subclass 444 visas.

If Australia maintains the ceiling of 44,000 people on skilled independent visas each year, the addition of New Zealanders already resident in Australia will effectively crowd out applicants from other source countries .

Applicants for skilled independent visas from other countries are assessed using a points-based system, with India (14,484), China (6,071) and the UK (3,462) the biggest source of migrants on these visas in 2016-17.

The ABC has reported that between 60,000 and 80,000 New Zealanders are eligible for the new visa. Wayne Parcell, an immigration partner at EY, reportedly said that Australia could expect about 10,000 applications this year.


The Greens immigration spokesman Nick McKim told Guardian Australia people should be “deeply concerned” by Dutton’s agenda.

“[Dutton] is seeking to cut immigration by stealth and to have more English-speaking, white and wealthy people migrate to Australia,” he said.

“This has been made clear through his changes to visas for New Zealanders, higher costs for family reunions, his ‘special attention’ for white South Africans as well as his attempts to introduce high-level English tests for potential citizens.”

Australia is on track for an intake of between 160,000 and 170,000 people in 2017-18, with immigration levels dropping to rates last seen in 2010without any formal reduction in the actual limit.

Migration figures have become highly politicised in the Coalition, with the former prime minister Tony Abbott campaigning for a cut in migration.

In February Dutton publicly canvassed a cut but the treasurer, Scott Morrison, rejected Abbott’s proposal, warningthat to slash migration by 80,000 people would cost the budget $4bn to $5bn over four years.

On Tuesday a report in the Australian triggered a spat in the government by stating the home affairs minister had informally suggested a cut of 20,000 but had been shut down by Morrison and Turnbull.

Some government figures believe the story was connected to leadership positioning by Dutton but others believe it is connected to a broader fight within the government about the policy direction required to turn around the government’s stubbornly negative poll trend– or to save the furniture.


On Friday the energy and environment minister, Josh Frydenberg, openly laughed at Abbott’s contributions on the migration debate in a segment on Channel Nine’s Today program.

Asked why he was laughing, Frydenberg replied: “It is only Tony Abbott. He is always going to cut across what the prime minister has been [saying] lately.”

The finance minister, Mathias Cormann, told Sky News on Friday the government would not be changing the 190,000 cap on net permanent migration.

“When it comes to permanent migration we’ve always said this is an upper limit [not a target],” he said.

Cormann said the biggest categories of temporary visitors to Australia were “New Zealanders, followed by students, followed by tourists”.


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Truth_Hurts

Alfrescian
Loyal
#33
Precisely ...welfare payment is pittance ...just to help people to stay above water. So, it is unlikely a goal of Kiwis to live on welfare payments. Despite the high taxes, there are 2 million kiwis wanting to stay on. Something must be going right to keep them around.
The trailer park trash will stay around
 

Truth_Hurts

Alfrescian
Loyal
#34
Heaps of kiwis have moved over to Ozland that Ozland has placed restrictions on kiwis. Bloody kiwis were gaming the system like mozzies n other riff Raff's.

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New Zealanders living in Australia say their rights are being eroded
ABC CAPRICORNIA BY INGA STÜNZNERUPDATED TUE 27 JUN 2017, 8:21 AM AEST
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PHOTO
Lobby group Oz Kiwi says Australians have more rights in New Zealand, than Kiwis who move here.

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS: LAWRIEM
New Zealanders living in Australia are getting a raw deal, and the proposed changes to Australian citizenship will only make it worse.

That is the warning from a lobby group for New Zealanders living in Australia, Oz Kiwi, which spent the past week in urgent meetings with politicians on both sides of the Tasman.

Oz Kiwi spokesperson Joanne Cox said there had been a steady erosion of rights since 2001, when New Zealanders were no longer considered permanent residents on arrival.

The changes will see citizenship applicants reside as permanent residents for four years rather than one.

New Zealand students will have a change in their status and will face full domestic fees and will pay more than triple their current fees.

"These things are happening on the sly," Ms Cox said.

"What was happening 10 yeas ago is no longer the case and people don't realise the changes until it's too late."

Crossing 'the ditch'
More than 600,000 New Zealanders live in Australia, mainly in New South Wales and Queensland, and until recently the flow between countries was one-sided.

Over the past three years, the number of New Zealanders heading to Australian shores had dropped from an average of 27,600 a year to 20,500 last year,according to Statistics New Zealand.

More people are also moving from Australia to New Zealand, with numbers over the past three years almost doubling to 15,800 a year compared with an average of 8,900 each year for the previous 35 years.

There are now more than 62,000 Australians living there.


PHOTO More Australians are heading across the ditch than ever before.
SUPPLIED: IAN BRODIE/TOURISM NEW ZEALAND

Disparity not unnoticed
The situation has not gone unnoticed in New Zealand, and its Minister for Foreign Affairs Gerry Brownlee warned New Zealanders in Australia to consider taking out dual citizenship or face fewer rights.

Ms Cox, who met with the minister and his advisors last week, said this was not easy as New Zealanders did not have the same pathway to citizenship as other migrants.

The temporary Special Category Visa, which entitled New Zealanders to work and live in Australia indefinitely, did not provide the same pathway to citizenship, she said.

"There's a large cohort of New Zealanders who've arrived in Australia since February 2001 and [in] recent times who are really disenfranchised and they don't have many options to gain citizenship," Ms Cox said.

"The longer they live here, the more disenfranchised they become."


PHOTO New Zealand's Prime Minister Bill English has called the proposed changes "disappointing".
AAP: LUKAS COCH

Ms Cox suggested New Zealanders find other avenues, such as via a spousal visa.

"If they have an Australian partner, their partner can sponsor them, but that visa costs $7,000 plus the medical tests and other fees associated with applying for that sponsorship," she said.

Ms Cox said the only other avenue was to apply for a skills visa based on the skills shortage list, however New Zealanders were not sponsored for these roles.

"They can just get on a plane and work here anyway so, why would an employer look at a New Zealander and say, 'Well, I'm going to pay $3,000 or $4,000 more to get them over here' when they don't have to?" she said.

'We're all Anzacs' say Kiwis in Australia
New Zealander Lisa Kibblewhite moved to Rockhampton, in central Queensland, three years ago with her Australian husband and said she was shocked at the rollback of entitlements.


PHOTO Lisa Kibblewhite says she assumed New Zealanders had the same rights as Australians.
ABC CAPRICORNIA: INGA STÜNZNER

"I assumed that even back in the old days, Kiwis who moved to Australia got the same rights as an Australian," she said.

"It's devastating actually to think that I'm not valued enough in this country to be given a fair go, but Australians are valued in my country."

Ms Kibblewhite said she was horrified at the thought of having to be a permanent resident for four years and then having to pay $7,000 for her application as a spouse.

"Financially, that's not viable for my family," she said.

"It terrifies me that if something, God forbid, happens to my husband and he dies or something awful and is incapacitated somewhat, I have no fall back. It's very scary."

Neil Halliday, who now lives in the coastal town of Yeppoon, is like many New Zealanders unaware of gradual changes to visas.

"I just live here with my family and try to provide — I haven't been forced to," he said.

On discovering what rights New Zealanders did have in this country, he was surprised.

"It's a little bit unfair the conditions New Zealanders are being put into in Australia, considering we're all Anzacs and all our history means we spend a lot of time together," he said.

Although he is a permanent resident because he lived in Australia during the 1990s, he said the cost of citizenship for him, his partner and five children was prohibitive.

"I'm just looking to solidify our family situation, [so] maybe down the track," he said.

"[The application fee] is part of a deposit on a house, which would be more beneficial to my situation."

New visa will be welcome change
Last year the Turnbull Government brought in a new category of visa — a skilled independent New Zealand visa — where applicants needed to average $54,000 annually for five years to qualify.

This comes into effect on July 1, and Ms Cox said it was a welcome change, providing a new pathway to permanent residency followed by citizenship for up to 100,000 New Zealanders.

However, many business owners who ploughed their money back into their business would miss out, Ms Cox said.

Through a media statement, the Department of Immigration and Border Protection did not address whether any historic reforms would be addressed, but said the new pathway to citizenship was an acknowledgement of the special bilateral relationship between Australia and New Zealand.

The spokesperson said eligible applicants could then apply for citizenship after a year as a permanent resident.

Ms Kibblewhite said she should have done her homework before moving to Australia.

"We've always been neighbours — and there's the natural rivalry across the Tasman — but when the chips are down we Kiwis and Aussies look out for each other," she said.

"This isn't looking out for each other. This is just taking."

POSTED MON 26 JUN 2017, 9:51 AM AEST
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Australia's immigration changes 'disappointing', NZ PM says
New Zealand tightens immigration rules in 'Kiwi-first' crackdown
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Top of pageChange to standard view
 

Leongsam

Administrator
Admin
Loyal
#35
Heaps of kiwis have moved over to Ozland that Ozland has placed restrictions on kiwis. Bloody kiwis were gaming the system like mozzies n other riff Raff's.

ABC Home

Log In

Search

ABC News
Breaking news

Apple has been fined $9 million for making false or misleading representations to customers with faulty iPhones and iPads.

ABC NEWS

New Zealanders living in Australia say their rights are being eroded
ABC CAPRICORNIA BY INGA STÜNZNERUPDATED TUE 27 JUN 2017, 8:21 AM AEST
Email Facebook Twitter WhatsApp

PHOTO
Lobby group Oz Kiwi says Australians have more rights in New Zealand, than Kiwis who move here.

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS: LAWRIEM
New Zealanders living in Australia are getting a raw deal, and the proposed changes to Australian citizenship will only make it worse.

That is the warning from a lobby group for New Zealanders living in Australia, Oz Kiwi, which spent the past week in urgent meetings with politicians on both sides of the Tasman.

Oz Kiwi spokesperson Joanne Cox said there had been a steady erosion of rights since 2001, when New Zealanders were no longer considered permanent residents on arrival.

The changes will see citizenship applicants reside as permanent residents for four years rather than one.

New Zealand students will have a change in their status and will face full domestic fees and will pay more than triple their current fees.

"These things are happening on the sly," Ms Cox said.

"What was happening 10 yeas ago is no longer the case and people don't realise the changes until it's too late."

Crossing 'the ditch'
More than 600,000 New Zealanders live in Australia, mainly in New South Wales and Queensland, and until recently the flow between countries was one-sided.

Over the past three years, the number of New Zealanders heading to Australian shores had dropped from an average of 27,600 a year to 20,500 last year,according to Statistics New Zealand.

More people are also moving from Australia to New Zealand, with numbers over the past three years almost doubling to 15,800 a year compared with an average of 8,900 each year for the previous 35 years.

There are now more than 62,000 Australians living there.


PHOTO More Australians are heading across the ditch than ever before.
SUPPLIED: IAN BRODIE/TOURISM NEW ZEALAND

Disparity not unnoticed
The situation has not gone unnoticed in New Zealand, and its Minister for Foreign Affairs Gerry Brownlee warned New Zealanders in Australia to consider taking out dual citizenship or face fewer rights.

Ms Cox, who met with the minister and his advisors last week, said this was not easy as New Zealanders did not have the same pathway to citizenship as other migrants.

The temporary Special Category Visa, which entitled New Zealanders to work and live in Australia indefinitely, did not provide the same pathway to citizenship, she said.

"There's a large cohort of New Zealanders who've arrived in Australia since February 2001 and [in] recent times who are really disenfranchised and they don't have many options to gain citizenship," Ms Cox said.

"The longer they live here, the more disenfranchised they become."


PHOTO New Zealand's Prime Minister Bill English has called the proposed changes "disappointing".
AAP: LUKAS COCH

Ms Cox suggested New Zealanders find other avenues, such as via a spousal visa.

"If they have an Australian partner, their partner can sponsor them, but that visa costs $7,000 plus the medical tests and other fees associated with applying for that sponsorship," she said.

Ms Cox said the only other avenue was to apply for a skills visa based on the skills shortage list, however New Zealanders were not sponsored for these roles.

"They can just get on a plane and work here anyway so, why would an employer look at a New Zealander and say, 'Well, I'm going to pay $3,000 or $4,000 more to get them over here' when they don't have to?" she said.

'We're all Anzacs' say Kiwis in Australia
New Zealander Lisa Kibblewhite moved to Rockhampton, in central Queensland, three years ago with her Australian husband and said she was shocked at the rollback of entitlements.


PHOTO Lisa Kibblewhite says she assumed New Zealanders had the same rights as Australians.
ABC CAPRICORNIA: INGA STÜNZNER

"I assumed that even back in the old days, Kiwis who moved to Australia got the same rights as an Australian," she said.

"It's devastating actually to think that I'm not valued enough in this country to be given a fair go, but Australians are valued in my country."

Ms Kibblewhite said she was horrified at the thought of having to be a permanent resident for four years and then having to pay $7,000 for her application as a spouse.

"Financially, that's not viable for my family," she said.

"It terrifies me that if something, God forbid, happens to my husband and he dies or something awful and is incapacitated somewhat, I have no fall back. It's very scary."

Neil Halliday, who now lives in the coastal town of Yeppoon, is like many New Zealanders unaware of gradual changes to visas.

"I just live here with my family and try to provide — I haven't been forced to," he said.

On discovering what rights New Zealanders did have in this country, he was surprised.

"It's a little bit unfair the conditions New Zealanders are being put into in Australia, considering we're all Anzacs and all our history means we spend a lot of time together," he said.

Although he is a permanent resident because he lived in Australia during the 1990s, he said the cost of citizenship for him, his partner and five children was prohibitive.

"I'm just looking to solidify our family situation, [so] maybe down the track," he said.

"[The application fee] is part of a deposit on a house, which would be more beneficial to my situation."

New visa will be welcome change
Last year the Turnbull Government brought in a new category of visa — a skilled independent New Zealand visa — where applicants needed to average $54,000 annually for five years to qualify.

This comes into effect on July 1, and Ms Cox said it was a welcome change, providing a new pathway to permanent residency followed by citizenship for up to 100,000 New Zealanders.

However, many business owners who ploughed their money back into their business would miss out, Ms Cox said.

Through a media statement, the Department of Immigration and Border Protection did not address whether any historic reforms would be addressed, but said the new pathway to citizenship was an acknowledgement of the special bilateral relationship between Australia and New Zealand.

The spokesperson said eligible applicants could then apply for citizenship after a year as a permanent resident.

Ms Kibblewhite said she should have done her homework before moving to Australia.

"We've always been neighbours — and there's the natural rivalry across the Tasman — but when the chips are down we Kiwis and Aussies look out for each other," she said.

"This isn't looking out for each other. This is just taking."

POSTED MON 26 JUN 2017, 9:51 AM AEST
SHARE
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Australia's immigration changes 'disappointing', NZ PM says
New Zealand tightens immigration rules in 'Kiwi-first' crackdown
NZ parents left 'broken' after Australian-born child denied NDIS access

'Terrible and vile' social media messages sent to Eurydice Dixon mourners

MORE FROM ABC NEWS
Top of pageChange to standard view
You obviously do not understand the system. Kiwis and live and work in Australia but they do not automatically get PR and without PR or citizenship they cannot access the benefits that OZs are entitled too.

Because of this the flood or migration from NZ to OZ which occurred prior to 2001 has been reduced to a trickle.
 

ginfreely

Alfrescian
Loyal
#36
You obviously do not understand the system. Kiwis and live and work in Australia but they do not automatically get PR and without PR or citizenship they cannot access the benefits that OZs are entitled too.

Because of this the flood or migration from NZ to OZ which occurred prior to 2001 has been reduced to a trickle.
In 2009 still have people from NZ working in my ex company Australia office.
 

Truth_Hurts

Alfrescian
Loyal
#37
You obviously do not understand the system. Kiwis and live and work in Australia but they do not automatically get PR and without PR or citizenship they cannot access the benefits that OZs are entitled too.

Because of this the flood or migration from NZ to OZ which occurred prior to 2001 has been reduced to a trickle.
Actually they still get many Benefits. But if they complain. They can stay in kiwiland
 

Leongsam

Administrator
Admin
Loyal
#38
Actually they still get many Benefits. But if they complain. They can stay in kiwiland
The best system is Singapore's CPF. The more you put in the more you get out when you retire. In NZ you can be paying $500,000 a year in taxes for 40 years but when you retire all you get is a measly $290 a week.
 

Truth_Hurts

Alfrescian
Loyal
#39
The best system is Singapore's CPF. The more you put in the more you get out when you retire. In NZ you can be paying $500,000 a year in taxes for 40 years but when you retire all you get is a measly $290 a week.
The resident left wing bleeding heart liberal fuck wit loves such a policy. And illegals and trailer park trash get more benefits he happier
 
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