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A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

yinyang

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
Gun violence in Thailand: A problem that can't be solved

By Jack Board @JackBoardCNA
12 May 2018 06:36AM (Updated: 12 May 2018 06:40AM)


thai-guns-1.jpg
thai-guns-5.jpg

BANGKOK: When Sunantha Ratchawat was hit, her body went numb. It was dark inside the bar, popular with young Thais drinking and dancing and on this night, it was crowded. Music - American hip hop - was blasting through the venue’s speakers.

Sunantha, who goes by the name of Pam, was in her early 20s and on a casual night out in 2006 with friends on Khao San Road, a rowdy nightlife district in Bangkok. It was a normal place for her to hang out, and when an altercation broke out near her inside the bar, she initially did not pay much attention.


But when gunfire ripped through the bar, her life changed.

“I heard that someone shot a gun,” Pam said. “My friend was so scared and we tried to sit down and make ourselves as safe as much as we could.

“But unfortunately, the one that was shot and ran away from the bad guy came to us and fell down on us and the bad guy tried to kill him. But it was me and my friend that were shot.”


thai-guns-3.jpg


View attachment 42568
Pam was shot at a busy night on Thailand's notorious Khao San Road. (Photo: Jack Board)

“The second I got shot, I didn’t know myself because it was very hectic, very loud: Bang bang bang bang, I didn't know,” she said.

“First, I felt numbness on my under arm first and then I saw my blood on my arms and then I felt hurt, very hurt, and at that second I realised I’d been shot.”

Bleeding profusely, she was admitted to a nearby hospital and stayed in an intensive care unit for seven days. She did not know it at the time, but she had been shot twice; another bullet was still lodged inside her.

Her friend Not had been shot in the stomach, while another victim, someone Pam had never met, was dead.

‘GUNS MAKE PEOPLE EQUAL’

Thailand is known widely as the land of smiles. But within the fabric of its society is an underlying pattern of firearm use.

Studies show that Thailand has a higher rate of gun-related killings per capita than the United States, a country where deadly shootings dominate news headlines and the political agenda. Thailand is second only behind the Philippines within the region.

There are millions of powerful weapons across the country and many of them are illegal and unregistered.

In 2016, there were more than 3,000 homicides by a firearm in the country - a rate of 4.45 deaths per 100,000 people, according to research by the University of Washington.

Thailand’s rate is nearly eight times that of neighbouring Malaysia and when deaths from armed conflict are removed, it is even greater than one of the world’s most dangerous countries, Iraq.

Most of the homicides in Thailand are put down to criminal elements, gang activity or conflicts related to a loss of face or personal grievances. There is not the spate of mass shootings that occur so often in the US.

“Sometimes we get in a conflict and guns seem to be the answer. Guns make people equal,” said Pol Col Naras Savestanan, the director general of the country’s Department of Corrections.

Yet despite the high rates of violence, Thai authorities still do not have a clear picture of exactly how many guns are out there on the streets.

A MURKY PICTURE

The man tasked with compiling national data admits that it is incomplete and messy. All of the records throughout the country since gun ownership laws were introduced in 1947 have only ever been recorded manually by hand.

“Not only that, all the records are scattered among the districts and the provincial offices. There are errors. We had five to six million licenses, and now we’re trying to put them into a computer," said Chamnanwit Terat, the deputy director-general of the Department of Provincial Administration.

“We found that there are duplications, or one license that belongs to multiple weapons and therefore we have to go through those errors one case at a time.”

The department is attempting to create a central, online database for national gun records in an attempt to make the country more accountable for its weapons.

Chamnanwit believes self-defence is a justifiable reason for “mature” citizens to own firearms, especially when, he admits, they “can’t always rely on the state’s protection”. However, he wants licensing laws tightened to allow for reviews of a person’s suitability to possess a gun.

“Personally, I think those who possess or use firearms should have their license renewed once in a while. But as of now, once you get the permission to get your gun, you can keep it for life. You might be well behaved this year, but what about next year? What if you get sent to jail?”

MAKING PATRIOTS

More than 30,000 people are held in Thailand’s jail system for gun-related offences. Some of the most common are for lesser crimes like possessing an illegal weapon, or making guns; the homemade trade is known to be rife across the country, particularly by organised crime groups.

Earlier this year, an initiative was launched to give gun offenders three weeks of specialist weapon-making training - overseen by the government and the Royal Thai Army, with the aim of reducing the rates of released inmates re-offending.

“One of the biggest problems in Thailand is recidivism. One of the alternatives to the problem is finding them a job or employment,” Pol Col Naras Savestanan said.

The Department of Corrections handpicks the “geniuses” of homemade weapon making to get a better impression of how criminal groups are operating, and in the process hope to turn them into patriotic citizens.

“Some of those people make the gun themselves. They are a kind of naughty boy making the gun and trying to do something with it. So they will gain the knowledge, skills and experience of how the army works, how we develop our own weapons and on the other hand, the army, the government will gain some new ideas from them,” he said.

And while the law is tough on gun offenders, resulting in mass incarcerations, Pol Col Naras makes no apologies for the hardline stance.

“It’s better than having a high murder rate. Actually, we do have a high murder rate but at least to have a strict gun law might help to reduce that figure.

‘GUN HEAVEN’

Dozens of gun shops line the timeworn avenues of Wang Burapha, an old district in central Bangkok. Some of these establishments are well known for their history as gunsmiths and have been operating for decades. Over time, their windows have filled with modern weaponry.

“It’s kind of a surprise for first time visitors to this neighbourhood because Thailand is not really known to be a gun heaven,” said one firearm enthusiast.

These stores are not hidden and are not secret. It is the embodiment of the engrained nature of gun ownership in Thailand. Even by the government’s incomplete and unreliable count of legal guns, by the numbers, one in 10 Thais owns a firearm.


The paperwork required for gun ownership is not exhaustive. A citizen without a criminal record needs only to produce documents from their district office, a bank statement and a letter from their employer. The process typically takes a matter of weeks to complete and some of the cheapest rifles in Wang Burapha can be purchased for US$1,300.

While the price is much higher than in the United States, it is not out of reach for an ordinary citizen set on buying one.

“To be honest, it’s surprisingly easy,” the enthusiast said. “It depends on how long it takes to get your approval from the authorities. If you’re an ordinary citizen, it should be a very straightforward procedure.”

Buying illegal weapons, apparently the source of most crimes, is even more simple. A number of Thais told Channel NewsAsia that one could be arranged within a day or two via the black market.

There is no push to make gun possession illegal in Thailand and those who arm themselves within the framework of the law defend their rights with the same vigour and reasoning as gun rights defenders in the US.

“I believe a good person can use a gun in a good way. And if a bad person uses a gun, it’s going to be illegal anyway, said professional firearm self-defence trainer David Sutthaluang.

“If you ban guns in Thailand, it means the good guys won’t be having a gun so who can they protect?”

‘EVERY MORNING SOMEONE DIES’

Finding someone with an anti-gun agenda in Thailand is not so easy.

One politician, though, has been willing to take what is proving to be the unpopular side of this debate. As a former foreign minister of the country, the voice of Kasit Pirom stills carries weight.

He wants another nationwide gun amnesty period, where illegal guns could be surrendered without penalty, supported by the government and religious institutions. Thailand has attempted such amnesty periods several times in previous decades.

“It’s time we take stock of where are the guns and where do they come from. I think it’s a human reaction because every day you open a newspaper or you listen on the radio or particularly on television, every morning someone dies,” he said.

“We have so many extrajudicial killings. It seems so prevalent, becoming a sort of norm in the Thai society and yet in the backdrop of being a Buddhist country, a lot of Buddhist traditions, a lot of religious organisation are all about being peaceful and coexistence.

“In that sense I think we should do something about gun control. We do have a law, but there are weaknesses about enforcement.”

No justice was ever delivered for the shocking attack on Pam at the Khao San road nightspot. And the shooting has had a profound effect on her life ever since.

“I almost lost one of my arms but fortunately I was in the doctor’s hands and I did physical therapy for at least one year. Even now, my left hand is not 100 per cent but it’s ok. I got used to it already,” she said.

Now she is married and the mother of a young daughter. Her life is different from the times she spent frequenting Bangkok night spots.

But for years she says she was scared to be out in loud, public places like bars, in case something like this, a stranger with a gun intent on violence, happened again.

“Yes I was scared a bit. But that’s why I try to be more careful, try to look around and notice if there is anything wrong around me or close to me so I can run away in time,” she said.

“If you see someone that carries a gun, maybe it’s better you stay away from him because it’s not normal.”

Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/new...iland-a-problem-that-can-t-be-solved-10124114


PODCAST: Listen to Jack Board's account of gun violence in Thailand on the latest edition of The Asia Angle.
 

Froggy

Alfrescian (InfP) + Mod
Moderator
Generous Asset
For those who come to Thailand and wanna have a nice pizza (I do not consider Dominos, Pizza Hut, Pizza Company in Thailand real pizza) try Scozzi as they make reasonably good thin crusted pizza in a wood fired oven. Thais prefer thick pizza like from those names I mentioned.

Went to one at 9.25pm (last order 9.30pm, I fell staff not so happy I went so late) tonight for a pizza to go.

Scozzi at The Promenade mall near home


My pizza


Sauce


Spicy salami


More cheese


Mushrooms and ready to fire


Here you go


Before we go the parmesan ham


Ready to go


Home dinner
 

AhMeng

Alfrescian (Inf- Comp)
Asset
For those who come to Thailand and wanna have a nice pizza (I do not consider Dominos, Pizza Hut, Pizza Company in Thailand real pizza) try Scozzi as they make reasonably good thin crusted pizza in a wood fired oven. Thais prefer thick pizza like from those names I mentioned.

Went to one at 9.25pm (last order 9.30pm, I fell staff not so happy I went so late) tonight for a pizza to go.

Scozzi at The Promenade mall near home


My pizza


Sauce


Spicy salami


More cheese


Mushrooms and ready to fire


Here you go


Before we go the parmesan ham


Ready to go


Home dinner
Eat Pizza drink Hibiki Harmony. Hehehe...But I like :biggrin:
 

yinyang

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
Worthwhile look this?

Village on a plate
lifestyle May 13, 2018 01:00
By Khetsirin Pholdhampalit
The Sunday Nation

There’s plenty to eat and drink at Gaysorn from ancient Thai dishes with a contemporary flair to sinfully rich desserts made with purest chocolate

WITH THE COMPLETION of the office and retail space Gaysorn Tower late last year and the renovation of the re-branded mall known as Gaysorn Centre, a new community has sprung up right in the centre of Bangkok. Known as Gaysorn Village, the connecting buildings offer locals and tourists alike the chance to discover a lifestyle and culinary destination like no other.

Located at the corner of Bangkok’s Ratchaprasong intersection, the village plays on its diversity of food cultures to draw customers to a venue that’s generally perceived as a high-end destination specialising in luxury brands.

“Food is what everyone enjoys and we try to bring in various cuisines through our 20 restaurants and cafes,” explains Gaysorn Village’s executive director Korakot Srivikorn.

“The Ratchaprasong area is a community of working people who want a decent balance between life and work. Our aim is to offer them a journey that takes them from a Michelin-star restaurant and cigar and wine bars to tea and coffee speciality shops and Isaan and street-style outlets at prices to suit every wallet.”

Our recent culinary voyage started at the Thai fine-dining restaurant Paste that revises rare classic dishes with creative flair. The restaurant earned one star in the inaugural Michelin Guide Bangkok last year and its chef Bongkoch “Bee” Satongun was also named Asia’s Best Female Chef 2018 by Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants.

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A self-taught chef, Bee honed her culinary skills while working in her family’s restaurant and draws inspiration from centuries-old Thai cookbooks to reinterpret traditional cuisine in a modern context.

“There is a much larger range of Thai food than we see today and many dishes have long been forgotten. The distinctive character of classic Thai dishes is a fine balance between complex flavours. I use only fresh and artisanal ingredients from small and local producers because good ingredients will enhance good tastes. Curry pastes are made in-house. Our dried chilli comes from Kanchanaburi and is selected for its medium level of spiciness, aromatic flavour and colour,” Bee explains.

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Inspired by the ancient royal recipe for curry paste created by Princess Dara Rasmi – a royal consort of King Chulalongkorn (Rama V) – Bee introduces a starter with grilled river prawn and curry paste made from mamak mad (Northern pepper-berry). Priced at Bt700, the grilled river prawn is cooked with curry paste, madan (garcinia), bai chakhram (sea blite leaf) and pickled mushroom before being wrapped in mulberry leaves. It’s topped with ant eggs and dressed with coconut juice reduction.

Watermelon rind gets a second chance at life in a soup – a signature dish inspired by the Snidwongse family cookbook. The steamed watermelon rind is cut into thin slices and cooked in a curry made from the pastes of dried chilli, lemongrass, red onion and pepper. Sea bass and jicama dumplings wrapped with tofu sheets are added and the soup is seasoned with fish sauce, palm sugar and lemon juice. It’s Bt750.

“It may look like gaeng som (hot and sour tamarind soup), but the curry paste doesn’t use krachai (lesser ginger) but takrai (lemongrass). It’s a cross between gaeng liang (spicy vegetable soup), gaeng som and tom yum,” Bee explains.

Her yum tua phoo (spicy winged bean salad) comes with a nam prik pao (roasted chilli paste) prepared to a recipe from a centuries-old cookbook written by Mom Somjeen Rachanupraphan back in the reign of King Rama V. Here the roasted chilli is not fried with oil as it is today but simply mixed with nam yum (spicy sauce) – a concoction of fish sauce, lemon juice, palm sugar and chilli oil.

And in another move from contemporary preparation, the winged beans are not chopped and cooked with minced pork but blended with grilled baby corn and imported guinea fowl smoked with nutmeg and dressed with honey and kumquat. It costs Bt1,300.
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Nutmeg smoked guinea fowl with winged bean salad

Another favourite is yum som-o (pomelo salad) made from Siam Ruby pomelo – a species unique to Nakhon Si Thammarat –with char-grilled scarlet prawns from Spain and home-made chilli jam and plankton paste.
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“My food strikes a balance between the traditional and the contemporary. I want it to sit comfortably in between the past, the present and the future,” says Bee.

Japanese restaurant Sushi Mori doesn’t only serve sushi but offers customers some 300 dishes in both traditional and fusion styles. Prepared exclusively at its Gaysorn branch is the new creation Uni Sawa Shu – sea urchin on seared sourdough bread, Bt650.

This features a tiny cube of bread slightly seared to obtain a crispy texture and spread with a special sauce mixed with miso, foie gras and truffle oil. It’s then topped with sea urchin, caviar and truffle shavings.

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“I select premium bafun uni from Hokkaido, which is known for its fresh, firm, creamy and naturally sweet taste. I personally like the sourdough bread baked at Eric Kayser (the shop also has a branch at Gaysorn) and ask the bakers to craft my bread by reducing the sourness. In one bite, you can get a balance of flavours – creamy and sweet from the sea urchin, slightly salty from the sauce and slightly sour from the bread,” says co-owner Nacha Hetrakul, adding that customers can swap the sea urchin for A5-grade Tajima beef.

Other fusion dishes include shrimp tempura on a bed of green salad with slightly spicy tom yum sauce (Bt380) and torched salmon rolls topped with egg yolk (Bt440).
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The best place to sit at Sushi Mori is at the counter bar where diners can observe chefs at work. Omakase style sushi, where the selection is up to the chef, is also offered in three choices – traditional, signature and Bluefin tuna – with prices ranging from Bt2,500 to Bt3,500 for nine to 12 pieces.

For casual dining, Kub Kao’ Kub Pla run by the iberry Group has everything from ham-cheese spring rolls (Bt165) to a new main dish of lamb massaman curry with roti (Bt480) that’s only available at this branch. The tender marinated lamb shank is cooked sous-vide for 48 hours then grilled, and served with crispy fried roti and pickled cucumber relish.
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The iberry Group also operates the new cafe iBerista adjacent to Kub Kao’ Kub Pla. Two exclusive blends are on offer here: the Atlantic blend for hot coffee uses beans from Kenya, Guatemala, Colombia, Ethiopia and Brazil while the Marathon blend for iced drinks is made with beans from Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai with hints of citric and chocolate notes.

Worth trying is the iBerista iced latte (Bt130), which is topped with Hokkaido milk ice cream. Another special drink is iced black tangerine (Bt130) – black coffee mixed with home-made orange juice.

The iberry Group also operates the new cafe iBerista adjacent to Kub Kao’ Kub Pla. Two exclusive blends are on offer here: the Atlantic blend for hot coffee uses beans from Kenya, Guatemala, Colombia, Ethiopia and Brazil while the Marathon blend for iced drinks is made with beans from Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai with hints of citric and chocolate notes.

Worth trying is the iBerista iced latte (Bt130), which is topped with Hokkaido milk ice cream. Another special drink is iced black tangerine (Bt130) – black coffee mixed with home-made orange juice.
dc7382bb470a85fb20fdd9a9e6f75bbb.jpg


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The showroom-cum-wine bar at Gaysorn is the German crystal glassware brand’s first concept store. Guests can enjoy more than 40 different wines by the glass courtesy of the automatic wine dispenser that allows you to select your preferred wine in one of three pours – 30ml for taster option, 75 and 150ml for more serious drinking – at prices ranging from just Bt60 a glass to Bt3,500. A row of Riedel glassware is arranged to match the character and body of each wine and in-house sommeliers are on hand to offer advice. The selection changes every two months.


http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/lifestyle/30345181
 
Last edited:

chonburifc

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset

chonburifc

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
Gun violence in Thailand: A problem that can't be solved

By Jack Board @JackBoardCNA
12 May 2018 06:36AM (Updated: 12 May 2018 06:40AM)


View attachment 42572 View attachment 42573
BANGKOK: When Sunantha Ratchawat was hit, her body went numb. It was dark inside the bar, popular with young Thais drinking and dancing and on this night, it was crowded. Music - American hip hop - was blasting through the venue’s speakers.

Sunantha, who goes by the name of Pam, was in her early 20s and on a casual night out in 2006 with friends on Khao San Road, a rowdy nightlife district in Bangkok. It was a normal place for her to hang out, and when an altercation broke out near her inside the bar, she initially did not pay much attention.


But when gunfire ripped through the bar, her life changed.

“I heard that someone shot a gun,” Pam said. “My friend was so scared and we tried to sit down and make ourselves as safe as much as we could.

“But unfortunately, the one that was shot and ran away from the bad guy came to us and fell down on us and the bad guy tried to kill him. But it was me and my friend that were shot.”


View attachment 42574

View attachment 42568
Pam was shot at a busy night on Thailand's notorious Khao San Road. (Photo: Jack Board)

“The second I got shot, I didn’t know myself because it was very hectic, very loud: Bang bang bang bang, I didn't know,” she said.

“First, I felt numbness on my under arm first and then I saw my blood on my arms and then I felt hurt, very hurt, and at that second I realised I’d been shot.”

Bleeding profusely, she was admitted to a nearby hospital and stayed in an intensive care unit for seven days. She did not know it at the time, but she had been shot twice; another bullet was still lodged inside her.

Her friend Not had been shot in the stomach, while another victim, someone Pam had never met, was dead.

‘GUNS MAKE PEOPLE EQUAL’

Thailand is known widely as the land of smiles. But within the fabric of its society is an underlying pattern of firearm use.

Studies show that Thailand has a higher rate of gun-related killings per capita than the United States, a country where deadly shootings dominate news headlines and the political agenda. Thailand is second only behind the Philippines within the region.

There are millions of powerful weapons across the country and many of them are illegal and unregistered.

In 2016, there were more than 3,000 homicides by a firearm in the country - a rate of 4.45 deaths per 100,000 people, according to research by the University of Washington.

Thailand’s rate is nearly eight times that of neighbouring Malaysia and when deaths from armed conflict are removed, it is even greater than one of the world’s most dangerous countries, Iraq.

Most of the homicides in Thailand are put down to criminal elements, gang activity or conflicts related to a loss of face or personal grievances. There is not the spate of mass shootings that occur so often in the US.

“Sometimes we get in a conflict and guns seem to be the answer. Guns make people equal,” said Pol Col Naras Savestanan, the director general of the country’s Department of Corrections.

Yet despite the high rates of violence, Thai authorities still do not have a clear picture of exactly how many guns are out there on the streets.

A MURKY PICTURE

The man tasked with compiling national data admits that it is incomplete and messy. All of the records throughout the country since gun ownership laws were introduced in 1947 have only ever been recorded manually by hand.

“Not only that, all the records are scattered among the districts and the provincial offices. There are errors. We had five to six million licenses, and now we’re trying to put them into a computer," said Chamnanwit Terat, the deputy director-general of the Department of Provincial Administration.

“We found that there are duplications, or one license that belongs to multiple weapons and therefore we have to go through those errors one case at a time.”

The department is attempting to create a central, online database for national gun records in an attempt to make the country more accountable for its weapons.

Chamnanwit believes self-defence is a justifiable reason for “mature” citizens to own firearms, especially when, he admits, they “can’t always rely on the state’s protection”. However, he wants licensing laws tightened to allow for reviews of a person’s suitability to possess a gun.

“Personally, I think those who possess or use firearms should have their license renewed once in a while. But as of now, once you get the permission to get your gun, you can keep it for life. You might be well behaved this year, but what about next year? What if you get sent to jail?”

MAKING PATRIOTS

More than 30,000 people are held in Thailand’s jail system for gun-related offences. Some of the most common are for lesser crimes like possessing an illegal weapon, or making guns; the homemade trade is known to be rife across the country, particularly by organised crime groups.

Earlier this year, an initiative was launched to give gun offenders three weeks of specialist weapon-making training - overseen by the government and the Royal Thai Army, with the aim of reducing the rates of released inmates re-offending.

“One of the biggest problems in Thailand is recidivism. One of the alternatives to the problem is finding them a job or employment,” Pol Col Naras Savestanan said.

The Department of Corrections handpicks the “geniuses” of homemade weapon making to get a better impression of how criminal groups are operating, and in the process hope to turn them into patriotic citizens.

“Some of those people make the gun themselves. They are a kind of naughty boy making the gun and trying to do something with it. So they will gain the knowledge, skills and experience of how the army works, how we develop our own weapons and on the other hand, the army, the government will gain some new ideas from them,” he said.

And while the law is tough on gun offenders, resulting in mass incarcerations, Pol Col Naras makes no apologies for the hardline stance.

“It’s better than having a high murder rate. Actually, we do have a high murder rate but at least to have a strict gun law might help to reduce that figure.

‘GUN HEAVEN’

Dozens of gun shops line the timeworn avenues of Wang Burapha, an old district in central Bangkok. Some of these establishments are well known for their history as gunsmiths and have been operating for decades. Over time, their windows have filled with modern weaponry.

“It’s kind of a surprise for first time visitors to this neighbourhood because Thailand is not really known to be a gun heaven,” said one firearm enthusiast.

These stores are not hidden and are not secret. It is the embodiment of the engrained nature of gun ownership in Thailand. Even by the government’s incomplete and unreliable count of legal guns, by the numbers, one in 10 Thais owns a firearm.


The paperwork required for gun ownership is not exhaustive. A citizen without a criminal record needs only to produce documents from their district office, a bank statement and a letter from their employer. The process typically takes a matter of weeks to complete and some of the cheapest rifles in Wang Burapha can be purchased for US$1,300.

While the price is much higher than in the United States, it is not out of reach for an ordinary citizen set on buying one.

“To be honest, it’s surprisingly easy,” the enthusiast said. “It depends on how long it takes to get your approval from the authorities. If you’re an ordinary citizen, it should be a very straightforward procedure.”

Buying illegal weapons, apparently the source of most crimes, is even more simple. A number of Thais told Channel NewsAsia that one could be arranged within a day or two via the black market.

There is no push to make gun possession illegal in Thailand and those who arm themselves within the framework of the law defend their rights with the same vigour and reasoning as gun rights defenders in the US.

“I believe a good person can use a gun in a good way. And if a bad person uses a gun, it’s going to be illegal anyway, said professional firearm self-defence trainer David Sutthaluang.

“If you ban guns in Thailand, it means the good guys won’t be having a gun so who can they protect?”

‘EVERY MORNING SOMEONE DIES’

Finding someone with an anti-gun agenda in Thailand is not so easy.

One politician, though, has been willing to take what is proving to be the unpopular side of this debate. As a former foreign minister of the country, the voice of Kasit Pirom stills carries weight.

He wants another nationwide gun amnesty period, where illegal guns could be surrendered without penalty, supported by the government and religious institutions. Thailand has attempted such amnesty periods several times in previous decades.

“It’s time we take stock of where are the guns and where do they come from. I think it’s a human reaction because every day you open a newspaper or you listen on the radio or particularly on television, every morning someone dies,” he said.

“We have so many extrajudicial killings. It seems so prevalent, becoming a sort of norm in the Thai society and yet in the backdrop of being a Buddhist country, a lot of Buddhist traditions, a lot of religious organisation are all about being peaceful and coexistence.

“In that sense I think we should do something about gun control. We do have a law, but there are weaknesses about enforcement.”

No justice was ever delivered for the shocking attack on Pam at the Khao San road nightspot. And the shooting has had a profound effect on her life ever since.

“I almost lost one of my arms but fortunately I was in the doctor’s hands and I did physical therapy for at least one year. Even now, my left hand is not 100 per cent but it’s ok. I got used to it already,” she said.

Now she is married and the mother of a young daughter. Her life is different from the times she spent frequenting Bangkok night spots.

But for years she says she was scared to be out in loud, public places like bars, in case something like this, a stranger with a gun intent on violence, happened again.

“Yes I was scared a bit. But that’s why I try to be more careful, try to look around and notice if there is anything wrong around me or close to me so I can run away in time,” she said.

“If you see someone that carries a gun, maybe it’s better you stay away from him because it’s not normal.”

Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/new...iland-a-problem-that-can-t-be-solved-10124114


PODCAST: Listen to Jack Board's account of gun violence in Thailand on the latest edition of The Asia Angle.
Yup. Unlicensed guns is everywhere. Almost every somchai, somboon, somkit also have. Nowadays, not just ta por have hor, zha bor also have. Most worrying one is the motorsai kids (dek waen). These kids will shoot and run. Stay far far from dek waen.
 

chonburifc

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
In some not so reputable joints, usually open beer, dont dare to open blend 285 or Hong Thong, Not even JW Red label and 100 Pipers because the source of whisky of these “not so reputable joints” very questionable.

Looks like nowadays, only left Coke and Soda or Nam Plao can order at these joints.

Beer Plorm (fake leo and chang)
 

Froggy

Alfrescian (InfP) + Mod
Moderator
Generous Asset
Wow! This one is holiao. Looking at the ingredients, my rough estimate is P’Gob Hae Mee at least 500 baht. Me also kid teung hae mee but burnt a big hole in my pocket after last DIY hae mee. So now tabao prima hae mee premix.

Yes Bro very holiao the soup is great as I not only use prawn head but also small haybee to fry them first, you can imagine now ya.

Beehoon tng for my mehbaan
IMG_20180513_100525.jpg


Old man have beehoon mee tng
IMG_20180513_101130.jpg
 

Bonut

Alfrescian
Loyal
No lobang there for the time being. Must wait for sinkie friend to come this month end then make another trip up there. Pick up and drop off at airport.
I remember my Visa runs to Vientiane I used to pass by an intersection with an arrow pointing towards Maha Sarakham. I could never imagine how the driver could remember the routes in the wee hours of the morning. Every damn road looks the same to me.
 
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