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Tony Tan & Son lose the plot or jus tplain dishonest

Discussion in 'The Political / Serious Zone [no rep deductions]' started by scroobal, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. scroobal

    scroobal Alfrescian Old Timer

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    [h=2]STATEMENT BY PATRICK TAN – 29 July 2011
    [/h]

    by Dr Tony Tan on Friday, 29 July 2011 at 06:20


    I am proud to have served Singapore during my National Service. It is deeply upsetting to me that rumours have been circulating that impugn my integrity and the institution of National Service.


    After completing my A-levels in 1987, I joined my cohort entering National Service in 1988. After completing Basic Military Training and Officer Cadet School (Junior Term), I was awarded a President’s Scholarship and a Loke Cheng Kim Scholarship to study medicine in the United States, where medical training typically comprises of a pre-medical degree followed by a graduate medical degree. This is a longer process than in Singapore or the UK, but I chose it because I believed it was the best training for a medical scientist. I made my case to the Ministry of Defence and was granted permission to pursue this course of study.


    I attended Harvard University (late 1988-1992) for pre-medical studies and moved on directly without interruption to Stanford University, where I completed an MD-PhD degree under the highly-selective Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). During my studies, I also acquired experience in DNA microarray technology. The science behind this revolutionary scientific tool by Stanford scientists Drs Patrick Brown and Ron Davis was developed in 1995. With its applicability proven in 1997, microarray technology was only available at a few centers worldwide. I graduated with the Charles Yanofsky Award for Most Outstanding Graduate Thesis in Biology or Chemistry.


    After graduating from Stanford, I returned to Singapore in 2000 ready to complete my National Service in whatever post I was assigned. I knew that I had this obligation to complete. My father had since become Minister of Defence, but if anything that made it all the more important to carry out my duty.


    At that time, melioidosis (also known as “soil disease”) was a serious concern to MINDEF as it had been affecting soldiers in the field and is a potential bio-terrorism threat (see below for more details). I was attached to what is now the Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute (DMERI, then called DMRI) to research Burkholderia pseudomallei, the bacterium that causes melioidosis. This research involved an organism called C. elegans, which had been the subject of my PhD thesis. I also led a team to establish one of the first DNA microarray facilities in Singapore, allowing us to analyze melioidosis genetic variation with unprecedented speed, resolution, and scale. As a result of this work, DMERI and Singapore is now regarded as a major global center of melioidosis research, which has facilitated interactions with numerous international universities and defence institutes. Our DMERI research team published peer-reviewed papers in established scientific journals (see references below).
    Throughout my National Service, I received an NSman's salary and fulfilled all requirements of NS including IPPT and subsequent reservist obligations such as in-camp training at the rank of 3rd Sergeant.


    The current allegations — mostly posted anonymously on the Internet — are false. It seems clear that such rumours are intended to hurt my father, which makes it all the more painful for me. I am proud to have served my country, and I am proud of all that my father has done for Singapore also.


    References
    Gan YH, Chua KL, Chua HH, Liu B, Hii CS, Chong HL, Tan P. (2002) Characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei infection and identification of novel virulence factors using a Caenorhabditis elegans host system. Molecular Microbiology 44(5):1185-97


    Patterns of large-scale genomic variation in virulent and avirulent Burkholderia species (2004) Ong C, Ooi CH, Wang D, Chong H, Ng KC, Rodrigues F, Lee MA, Tan P. Genome Research 14(11):2295-307.


    Further information on meliodosis research at DMRI


    Melioidosis is a serious, often fatal infectious disease of human and animals caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseuodmallei (Bp). Bp is found in South East Asian soils including Singapore, and Bp has also been officially designated a potential biowarfare agent by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), similar to anthrax. In Singapore, meliodosis cases are not uncommon, and in a 2004 outbreak 15 people died from the disease. Within the SAF, meliodosis has also occurred in otherwise healthy National Servicemen, in some cases resulting in death. For these reasons, a research program was initiated by DMRI in the 1990s to study Bp and how it causes melioidosis.
    When I started my National Service stint in 2000, I was instructed to apply the knowledge I had obtained in my MD PhD to study melioidosis . Working with other colleagues from DMRI and NUS, we performed research to identify important genes used by Bp to cause disease, using the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host (Gan et al., 2002 Molecular Microbiology). We also applied the latest genomic technologies at that time such as microarrays to study genetic differences between different isolates of Bp, and discovered a surprising amount of molecular variation (Ong et al., 2004 Genome Research).


    Dr. Patrick Tan’s current work:
    I am still extensively involved in genomics and biomedical research. As a faculty member in the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School and Cancer Sciences Institute of Singapore, we have an extensive translational research program in stomach cancer, working with both basic scientists and clinicians. I also have an appointment with the Genome Institute of Singapore, where we continue our research on melioidosis in collaboration with DMERI (formally called DMRI).
     
  2. scroobal

    scroobal Alfrescian Old Timer

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    What a dishonest family. If the Govt or anyone in the establishment feels an iota of responsibility, they should step forward and clarify the issue. The son is a President Scholar and therefore is not bonded. He is the basics;

    1) No has alleged that his son did not do NS, skipped IPPT, or was not paid NS allowance but a regular salary etc. Why the father and son keeping addressing these things suggest attempt to obfuscate the real issue or an attempt to side step the issue or redirect the debate without addressing the concerns raised. Doesn't remotely sound Presidential to me.

    2) The issue is what appears to be unusual treatment accorded to the son. Some of it when his father was Defence Minister.

    3) I can categorically state that there is no such pathway or NS service vocation called "scientist" or "researcher". NS is not about matching one's professional standing or acquired knowledge in particular field. Dr Patrick is now telling lies. This chap has the audacity to claim that we are impugning his integrity. He has as much integrity as TT Durai who made claims of helping kidney patients but was enjoying the trappings of power.

    4) In the early 1980s, the decisions was made in CMPB that those who disrupt NS for post grad were kids of rich families and were abusing the system. That practice was thus stopped. I am stunned that he was allowed this. I know of cases where parents had ignored this and allowed their sons to continue to do post-grad. The kids on their return was charged in court and went to prison.

    5) Another dishonest claim by the son. He mentions that 15 people suffered from Melioidosis in 2004. but how many are actually NS men. Suggesting that this disease is decimating NS men or impacting the NS and SAF is not evident. For 99.9% of people, this is the first time that they even heard about it. The medical profession should step forward and make a statement.

    If Tony Tan has an modicum of self respect or a drop honesty still left in his blood, he should withdraw from the Presidency.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2011
  3. Leongsam

    Leongsam Administrator Staff Member Old Timer Old Timer

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    [h=4]Volume 15, Number 10–October 2009[/h] [h=4]Dispatch[/h] [h=1]Melioidosis in a Tropical City State, Singapore[/h] Tong Jen Lo, [​IMG] Li Wei Ang, Lyn James, and Kee Tai Goh
    Author affiliation: Ministry of Health, Singapore
    Suggested citation for this article
    Abstract
    The incidence of melioidosis in Singapore decreased during 1998–2007, with the exception of the first quarter of 2004. After heavy rainfalls, an increase in pneumonic cases with a high case-fatality rate was detected. We show that melioidosis has the potential to reemerge following adverse climate events.

    Melioidosis is a tropical infectious disease caused by a gram-negative bacillus, Burkholderia pseudomallei. It is endemic to southeast Asia and northern Australia, and cases are increasingly being reported in countries elsewhere in Asia, the Pacific, the Americas, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Middle East, and in travelers returning from tropical countries (1).
    B. pseudomallei is a saprophytic bacterium that can be found in soil and water samples in melioidosis-endemic countries. Transmission is generally by direct inoculation from exposure to soil or water, or through inhalation of aerosolized particles. The disease often affects persons with underlying conditions such as diabetes mellitus (1,2). Clinical manifestations are protean and may range from chronic abscesses to fulminant pneumonia and septicemia with high death rates (1).
    Singapore is a tropical island city state in southeast Asia. More than 80% of the population lives in high-rise public housing estates. Although the first case of melioidosis in Singapore was reported in 1920 (3), little is known about the incidence of the disease before it was made notifiable in 1989 when 3 apparently healthy young men died from melioidosis (4). We studied the epidemiology and clinical features of melioidosis in Singapore over a 10-year period (1998–2007). Our study assessed the trends in the epidemiology of the disease, clinical features, case-fatality rates, and risk factors associated with death.
    [h=3]The Study[/h] We analyzed the epidemiologic data of all cases of melioidosis reported by registered medical practitioners and laboratories to the Singapore Ministry of Health during 1998–2007. Clinical and laboratory criteria for notification were based on guidelines disseminated by the Ministry (5). Upon notification, trained public health officers carried out epidemiologic investigations by using a standardized form. Investigations included interviews with the patient or family members and a review of hospital records and laboratory results. Data obtained included age, gender, date of onset of the illness, travel history, possible occupational or recreational exposure to contaminated soil or water, concurrent medical conditions, laboratory and microbiologic results, and clinical outcome.
    Clinical specimens from patients with melioidosis were sent to clinical laboratories in the admitting hospitals for culture of B. pseudomallei (6) and, in some cases, for serology. Isolates were tested for antimicrobial sensitivity (7). A definitive case of melioidosis was defined as a clinically compatible case in which B. pseudomallei was isolated from a clinical specimen. If the diagnosis was based on an indirect hemagglutination test that showed a titer >16 (8), the case was considered presumptive. Both definitive and presumptive cases were included in the analysis.
    The estimated midyear population used for the calculation of the incidence rate was obtained from the Singapore Department of Statistics. Data on rainfall was obtained from the Meteorological Services Division of the National Environment Agency. Foreigners seeking medical treatment for melioidosis were excluded from the data analysis. Statistical analyses were performed by using SPSS Software version 15.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Biivariate analysis was performed by using χ[SUP]2[/SUP] test for categorical data. A p value <0.05 was considered statistically significant.
    [TABLE="align: right"]
    <tbody>[TR]
    [TD="bgcolor: #d8eceb"]
    Figure 1
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="bgcolor: #d8eceb"][​IMG][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="bgcolor: #d8eceb"]Figure 1. Incidence (per 100,000 population) and case-fatality rate (%) of melioidosis cases, Singapore, 1998–2007.
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD] [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="bgcolor: #d8eceb"]
    Figure 2
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="bgcolor: #d8eceb"][​IMG][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="bgcolor: #d8eceb"]Figure 2. Weekly melioidosis cases by onset date and rainfall totals, Singapore, January 4, 2004–January 1, 2005.
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    </tbody>[/TABLE]
    A total of 693 cases of melioidosis were reported during 1998–2007; of these, 83% were diagnosed by culture and 17% by serologic analysis. We observed a decreasing trend in the annual incidence rate, with the exception of an increase in 2004 (Figure 1). Patients ranged in age from 1 month to 97 years. The highest age-specific incidence rate of melioidosis was for adults >45 years of age. The annual incidence rate for male patients was 2.8–7.2× that for female. An increase in the number of cases in March and April 2004 was preceded by heavy rainfall (Figure 2), strong winds, and flash floods. A total of 23 cases of melioidosis were reported with onset of illness during the 5-week period between March 7 and April 10 (epidemiologic weeks 10–14). The proportion of cases with the pneumonic form of melioidosis during this period was 82.6%, compared to 47.8% for the remainder of 2004. The case-fatality rate was 52.6% and 36.4%, respectively (9). Only 4 of the 23 case-patients (17.3%) reported occupations that had exposure to soil, e.g., construction workers or gardeners.
    A total of 112 deaths were reported during the 10-year period; overall case-fatality rate was 16.2% (range 8.8%–27.1%). Of the reported cases, 75.5% had co-existing diseases, with diabetes (47.9%), hypertension (26.4%), renal impairment (13.3%), and ischemic heart disease (12.0%) being the most common. Patients with co-illnesses had a significantly higher case-fatality rate (19.3%) compared to those without (6.5%) (p<0.0005). Approximately half (50.4%) of the melioidosis cases were associated with bacteremia. Patients with bacteremic melioidosis had a significantly higher case-fatality rate (25.8%) than those without bacteremia (5.5%) (p<0.0005). Clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei demonstrated antimicrobial sensitivity to imipenem (100.0%), ceftazidime (99.1%), doxycycline (99.0%), amoxicillin/clavulanate (94.2%), and chloramphenicol (96.1%).
    [h=3]Conclusions[/h] Our study showed that male gender, old age, and diabetes mellitus were risk factors for melioidosis. The presence of bacteremia and co-illnesses were risk factors for death in patients with melioidosis, consistent with findings in other endemic countries. The overall case-fatality rate in this study was much lower compared to cases during 1989–1996 (39.5%) (10). This may be due to greater awareness among medical practitioners, earlier recognition of the disease, better intensive care, and an appropriate antimicrobial drug regimen.
    Unlike patients in Australia or Thailand, most of the case-patients in our study could not recall any occupational or recreational exposure to wet soil. The only reported episodes of percutaneous inoculation in Singapore were a few young adults with localized cutaneous infections and abscesses caused by occupational exposure to soil (4). B. pseudomallei was isolated from only 1.8% of soil samples and from none of the water samples in Singapore collected during epidemiologic investigations of reported cases (11). Tan et al. have suggested that in an urban setting excessive soil excavations could contribute to aerosolization of the bacterium (12).
    Rapid molecular typing of the bacteria during the outbreak in 2004 showed that the isolates were genetically heterogeneous, thus excluding the possibility of a common source (13). Moreover, the cases were distributed in different parts of the island without any particular geographic predilection. An epidemiologic investigation of cases in the first half of 2004 demonstrated a relationship between incidence of melioidosis and cumulative rainfall 7 days before onset of illness (14). This finding is consistent with other studies that demonstrated an association between incidence of melioidosis and intensity of rainfall. Researchers have posited that heavy rainfall causes movement of the bacteria to the surface with the rising water table (15). Severe climatic events may cause aerosolization of the bacteria and increase the risk for inhalation. Infection following inhalation of B. pseudomallei may result in more fulminant disease and a higher case-fatality rate (15).
    Melioidosis is emerging as a serious public health problem in many countries. Although the incidence and case-fatality rate of melioidosis in Singapore has decreased, it has the potential to resurface with adverse climate events such as heavy rainfall and flash floods.
    Dr Lo is an assistant director with the Ministry of Health, Singapore. His research interests include epidemiology of infectious diseases, public health policy, and health services.

     
  4. lockeliberal

    lockeliberal Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Dear Scroobal

    The normal route for a presidents scholar as far as I remember, even a doctor was, nine months to a year which was what TT sons did, disruption which is normal, completion of basic medical degree become a doctor come back to Singapord do MOCC serve out the remainder of NS after which proceed for advanced degree post grad diploma etc etc what is surprising is his deferment, length of deferment, and no mention of MOCC


    Locke
     
  5. Leongsam

    Leongsam Administrator Staff Member Old Timer Old Timer

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    References

    1. Cheng AC, Currie BJ. Melioidosis: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2005;18:383–416. PubMed DOI
    2. White NJ. Melioidosis. Lancet. 2003;361:1715–22. PubMed DOI
    3. Stanton AT, Fletcher W. Melioidosis. Studies from the Institute of Medical Research, Federated Malay States. London: John Bale & Sons and Danielson Ltd; 1932:8–9.
    4. Lim MK, Tan EH, Soh CS, Chang TL. Burkholderia pseudomallei infection in the Singapore Armed Forces from 1987 to 1994—an epidemiological review. Ann Acad Med Singapore. 1997;26:13–7.
    5. Ministry of Health Singapore; Tan Tock Seng Hospital. Melioidosis. A guide on infectious diseases of public health importance in Singapore. Singapore: Ministry of Health and Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 2004:55–56.
    6. Ashdown LR. An improved screening technique for isolation of Pseudomonas pseudomallei from clinical specimens. Pathology. 1979;11:293–7. PubMed DOI
    7. National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Performance standards for antimicrobial disk susceptibility tests. NCCLS Document M2-A5. Vol 13. Wayne (PA): The committee; 1993.
    8. Yap EH, Chan YC, Ti TY, Thong TW, Tan AL, Yeo M, et al. Serodiagnosis of melioidosis in Singapore by the indirect haemagglutination test. Singapore Med J. 1991;32:211–3.
    9. Ministry of Health Singapore. Annual report: communicable diseases surveillance in Singapore 2004. Singapore: The Ministry; 2005.
    10. Heng BH, Goh KT, Yap EH, Loh H, Yeo M. Epidemiological surveillance of melioidosis in Singapore. Ann Acad Med Singapore. 1998;27:478–84. PubMed DOI
    11. Ministry of the Environment. Annual Report: Communicable Diseases Surveillance in Singapore 1999. Singapore: The Ministry; 2000.
    12. Tan AL, Ang BS, Ong YY. Melioidosis: epidemiology and antibiogram of cases in Singapore. Singapore Med J. 1990;31:335–7.
    13. Liu Y, Loh JP, Aw LT, Yap EP, Lee MA, Ooi EE. Rapid molecular typing of Burkholderia pseudomallei, isolated in an outbreak of melioidosis in Singapore in 2004, based on variable-number tandem repeats. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2006;100:687–92. PubMed DOI
    14. Ministry of Health Singapore. Epidemiologic investigations into an epidemic of melioidosis, January–June 2004. Epidemiol News Bull. 2004;30:24–8.
    15. Currie BJ, Jacups SP. Intensity of rainfall and severity of melioidosis, Australia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2003;9:1538–42.
     
  6. myfoot123

    myfoot123 Alfrescian (Inf)

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    He has finally met his days and more to come. When he was chairman of SPH, he has spread countless rumors thru his editorial team to discredit other people. What goes around comes around to him. He cry foul for what.:eek:Io:
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2011
  7. sirus

    sirus Alfrescian (Inf)

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  8. scroobal

    scroobal Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Agree with you. The first part is according to the book including the Harvard/Stanford. It's the post grad piece and his subsequent deployment. I know of a senior civil servant who allowed a disruption for a chap to do post grad and was given a warning letter. The disruption was rescinded. I know of disruption for certain pathways to do post grad such as SAF/SPF scholars as well as others but this chap is not in similar schemes. He is also not bonded and not a scheme scholar. He is only a President scholar which does not come with a bond. Have checked this case when it first appeared. Confirmed special treatment and there are now follow-up enquiries but I suspect that it will be buried as TT was persuaded to run after the 6 turned them down when TCB declared his intention. This is clearly an embarrassment as kids have gone to jail for pursuing post grad and there a some that are classified as deserters. The other angle is the soft posting. So if someone came back with a post grad in tourism and as it is an important sector of the economy, I suppose if he was TT's son, he will running Raffles Hotel which at that time was a GLC.
     
  9. scroobal

    scroobal Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Actually NS men over the years have been "seconded" especially the unfit or medically injured cases. Some have done work in the tax and education department. But the were undying reasons. This idiots case is wholly bullshit. A clear abuse of position. I got upset when the son wrote his mother fucking condescending letter as though he was Albert Schweiter saving the sons of Singapore from a ravishing and out of control disease. A bloody disgrace. What integrity is he talking about. Some poor old ah soh lost her only son doing his NS and this guy talking about his integrity. He can shaft it up his royal blue arse.
     
  10. scroobal

    scroobal Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Thanks Sam'Clearly this clownwas trying to bullshit when the stats and data does not support the concern for this disease.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2011
  11. PTADER

    PTADER Alfrescian Old Timer

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    The blatant hypocrisy of Tony Tan...

    His son serving his remaining two years in a non-uniformed role as researcher in DMERI does not qualify as NS.

    One of the criteria of disruption for an NSF seeking disruption is that he must show potential to be an officer. To this end, the disrupted personel will return and is expected to complete OCS from where he last stopped his training before his disruption from NS.

    It begs the question as to why Patrick Tan did not complete the remaining 6 months of his OCS training. This is since the potential to be an officer is one prerequisite for disruption. And with that, the expectation is that you should continue with OCS training after returning from studies and not merely sail into a non-uniformed and physically non-onerous job.

    Tony Tan owes a reponsibility to all past, present and future National Servicemen and their parents to show how his son's treatment is, in his own words used 15 years ago in Perth, "fair" and "equitable".

    ******************

    "KNOW WHAT NS REQUIREMENTS ARE BEFORE MIGRATING".
    147th Prostitute Press
    21 October 1996

    IF YOU plan to emigrate from Singapore, please familiarise yourself with the national-service requirements of your sons.

    Deputy Prime Minister Tony Tan made this appeal in response to a question from the floor during a dinner hosted by the Temasek Club here on Saturday.

    A member of the 200-strong club, which is made up of Singaporeans and former citizens who live here, asked about national service for Singaporean boys who have emigrated here with their families.

    The minister said he appreciated their concerns, but "national service is, we believe, fundamental to Singapore's survival".

    If the boys left the country before they reached 11 years of age, they could renounce their citizenship when they turned 21 and could visit Singapore as a foreigner.

    If they left after the age of 11, they would have to return to Singapore later for national service of between two and 2-1/2 years.

    Dr Tan said: "We take the view that they have enjoyed some of the benefits of living in Singapore, and so have to fulfil their NS responsibilities before they can renounce their citizenship."

    He added: "Singapore does not recognise the system of dual citizenship.

    "Children who take up Australian citizenship are considered to be still Singaporean citizens and have to fulfill their NS responsibilities."

    That is a principle which is difficult for the Defence Ministry to compromise, and the ministry is standing firm on that, he stressed.

    "In fact, we have received representations from various government ministries of our own to say that, because of our strictness in applying this policy, we are denying re-entry into Singapore of many talented Singaporeans who can benefit our country," he disclosed.

    The rationale, however, is: "The only way we can operate our NS system and have the support of Singaporeans is when everybody feels that our system, unlike those in some other countries, is fair, is applied equitably and no one liable for NS is allowed not to serve."

    To another question relating to business opportunities, Dr Tan said that the expertise of many Australian companies could be supported by the capital and range of contacts of Singapore enterprises.

    That would make for successful joint ventures in the booming economies of South-east Asia and East Asia.

    A Temasek Club member asked for a Singapore consular office to be opened in Perth to help the thousands of Singaporeans who live here with passport matters and business links.

    Dr Tan replied that the prospects were good given the growing investments of Singapore companies in Perth and Western Australia.

    Dr Tan arrived in Perth on Friday for a seven-day introductory visit to Australia as Singapore's Defence Minister.

    He and his delegation left here yesterday for Canberra where today they will call on Australian Prime Minister John Howard and Defence Minister Ian McLachlan.
     
  12. PTADER

    PTADER Alfrescian Old Timer

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    One of the criteria for NS disruption....




    Mindef changes NS deferment rule for medical studies overseas
    147th Prostitute Press
    3 April 1991

    MINDEF has amended its rules granting disruption to national servicemen taking up overseas medical studies.

    Previously, those taking up such studies were selectively disrupted from their national service after six months.

    Now, they are subject to the same rules as those going overseas for all other courses of studies, under which NS men enlisted in December will first serve a minimum of 24 months before being eligible for disruption.

    Those enlisted last month will serve 21 months and complete their full-time liability when they return.

    But Mindef will continue to grant selective early disruption after six months to NS men wishing to study medicine at the National University of Singapore.

    The new rule will affect the batch of students sitting for their GCE A-level examinations this year.

    These details were announced yesterday by Mindef's director of manpower, Mr Chan Heng Loon.

    He said that previously, Mindef had allowed a limited number to disrupt national service after six months to study medicine abroad.

    Since 1986, between 60 and 100 medical students a year were successful.

    They were selected based on their military performance during the six months and their potential to be officers, said Mr Chan.

    But dozens of cases yearly were not chosen, he added.


    "This caused a great deal of disappointment to the students and their parents as well as inconvenience to their universities," he said.

    He added: "Some of these students had to turn up personally at the institutions for interviews. Can you imagine the situation when dozens of them, after spending so much time and resources getting places, are then told they can't go?"

    Although NUS as a matter of policy reserves places for qualified NS men, foreign universities require them to reapply for places.

    Said Mr Chan: "Mindef reminds all national servicemen applying for overseas courses that it makes no exceptions to the rules for early disruption."

    The SAF, he said, will meet its need for about 60 national service doctors a

    year from the pool of local graduates.

    Yesterday, he also briefed principals or representatives of junior colleges and pre- university centres.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2011
  13. PTADER

    PTADER Alfrescian Old Timer

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    An example of an NSF having to continue OCS from where he left off after being granted disruption...


    Age gives officer cadet the edge.
    147th Prostitute Press
    29 July 2002

    AT 25, Mr Steven Tay Hong Joo went back to the sweat and toil of national service, picking up where he left off 5 1/2 years before when he went to Britain to study.

    Then, he had already completed eight months at the Singapore Armed Forces Officer Cadet School (OCS), and had another 2 1/2 months left.

    But he disrupted his national service when he snagged a teaching scholarship from the Public Service Commission, for a bachelor's degree in chemistry and physical education at Loughborough University.

    He got his teaching diploma there before moving on to Cambridge University to do a master's in chemistry.

    Despite being older than most of his coursemates when he rejoined OCS this year, Mr Tay bagged the coveted Sword of Honour yesterday.

    He was one of seven who received the award, given to those who top the officer cadet course.

    Said Mr Tay: 'Most of my coursemates are 20 or 21 years old. I think my maturity, which helped me make better judgments and decisions, set me apart from the rest.'

    The strapping armour officer said that while he had no problems with the physical rigours of training, he found it 'tough mentally'.

    He explained: 'I was used to life as a civilian for five years. I could take my time to do things - wake up late, go to the library or watch TV.

    'But when I returned to OCS, I had to get used to the lifestyle, the strict discipline, where life starts at 5 am and we rush through meals.'

    Mr Tay will join the Education Ministry after he completes NS in July next year.

    His father, a technician, and mother, a production line worker - both in their 50s - braved the drizzle to lend their support yesterday at Safti, the military training institute.

    A total of 324 cadets were commissioned as officers by Deputy Prime Minister Tony Tan.

    Dr Tan, who is also Defence Minister, told them: 'The responsibility of safeguarding our homeland falls squarely on you, the future leaders of the SAF.'.
     
  14. PTADER

    PTADER Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Can a stint as a non-uniformed researcher in DMERI be considered "arduous"?....



    DR TAN - ESSENTIAL TO HAVE PARENTS SUPPORT NS.
    147th Prostitute Press
    3 October 1995

    PARENTS' acceptance and support for national service help form the cornerstone for Singapore's defence, said Deputy Prime Minister Tony Tan on Sunday.

    He was speaking at the first Officer Cadet Course commissioning parade at the Safti Military Institute since it opened in August.

    Looking at the good turnout of parents, Dr Tan, who is also the Defence Minister, said that national service, arduous as it was, could be made more bearable if parents gave their sons emotional and moral support.

    Whether servicemen regarded their training as an honourable duty or as a chore depended to a great extent on their parents' attitudes towards national service, he said.

    "In a wider definition of Singapore's security requirements, national service is therefore as much a responsibility for parents as it is for our sons," Dr Tan said.

    To the newly commissioned officers, he said that the SAF depended on them.

    He added: "As a small country with a small population, we can never build a credible defence force based on regular servicemen alone."

    National service was the very basis for Singapore's continued existence as an independent nation-state, he said.

    "Hence, whether now or in the future, it will always be a fact of life for all able-bodied male Singaporeans."

    A total of 143 officer cadets from the army and the air force were commissioned.

    Dr Tan presented ceremonial swords to the two Sword-of-Honour winners, Officer Cadets Yeo Gek Chuan and Lim Jit Shyan.

    Officer Cadet Philip Paul Regaspi Fortuno of the Armed Forces of the Philippines was also presented a ceremonial sword by Dr Tan on behalf of the Philippine President.

    Senior SAF officers at the parade included Chief of Defence Force, Major-General Bey Soo Kiang; Chief of Navy, Rear-Admiral Kwek Siew Jin; Chief of Army, Brigadier-General Han Eng Juan; and Chief of Air Force, Brigadier-General Goh Yong Siang.
     
  15. SneeringTree

    SneeringTree Alfrescian Old Timer

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    While others spent their two year NS slogging or doing senseless clerical work; while other scholars spent every long vacation completing their NS liabilities, this chap is busy building up his career. Honestly, his CV looks positively thin to be in a senior tenured position. I can list dozens others who did not make tenure with much stronger CV than him.
     
  16. scroobal

    scroobal Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Your comment below and Locke's comment about MOCC raised a concern. I went to check and now there are indeed fresh concerns.

    It appears now that his initial granting of disruption is not kosher. The policy only allows disruption for local medical studies and they have to return to NS to do MOCC. He did not even go for MOCC. Who made the decision to disrupt. CMPB needs to reveal what the policy and who else were granted exception. My understanding is none until Patrick's case.

    This is clearly a blatant abuse of position and warrants a CPIB investigation at a minimum.
     
  17. scroobal

    scroobal Alfrescian Old Timer

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    I noticed the same with his CV.

    He also needs to explain what his rank and NS status having not completed senior term and the MOCC as well.
     
  18. Confuseous

    Confuseous Alfrescian (Inf)

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    In this day and age, the audacity of Phoney Tan and his Son's responses reek of dishonesty and sheer arrogance.
    And he wants to be President? Ha ha.
     
  19. DoctorEvil

    DoctorEvil Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Dr. Patrick Tan Boon Ooi could not have gone for MOCC because one has to be a qualified MO to undertake the course and he is not a registered doctor with the Singapore Medical Council. He doesn't have an MCR number which you can check on the SMC website (see http://www.google.com/url?sa=D&q=ht...me.jsp&usg=AFQjCNHiyR68glUbYiJ0mvVY3mzEeSSMkQ). He has a medical degree but he is not a fully qualified doctor. Under the Medical Registration Act, he could not and still cannot practise medicine legally in Singapore. In effect, Mindef gave him a 12-year deferment for him to complete his postgraduate studies, not to be a doctor. This in itself is highly irregular.
     
  20. lockeliberal

    lockeliberal Alfrescian Old Timer

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    Dear Scroo

    It gets worst. We have a third sergant for a presidents scholar :))) Wah leow

    Locke







    QUOTE=scroobal;782749]What a dishonest family. If the Govt or anyone in the establishment feels an iota of







    responsibility, they should step forward and clarify the issue. The son is a President Scholar and therefore is not bonded. He is the basics;

    1) No has alleged that his son did not do NS, skipped IPPT, or was not paid NS allowance but a regular salary etc. Why the father and son keeping addressing these things suggest attempt to obfuscate the real issue or an attempt to side step the issue or redirect the debate without addressing the concerns raised. Doesn't remotely sound Presidential to me.

    2) The issue is what appears to be unusual treatment accorded to the son. Some of it when his father was Defence Minister.

    3) I can categorically state that there is no such pathway or NS service vocation called "scientist" or "researcher". NS is not about matching one's professional standing or acquired knowledge in particular field. Dr Patrick is now telling lies. This chap has the audacity to claim that we are impugning his integrity. He has as much integrity as TT Durai who made claims of helping kidney patients but was enjoying the trappings of power.

    4) In the early 1980s, the decisions was made in CMPB that those who disrupt NS for post grad were kids of rich families and were abusing the system. That practice was thus stopped. I am stunned that he was allowed this. I know of cases where parents had ignored this and allowed their sons to continue to do post-grad. The kids on their return was charged in court and went to prison.

    5) Another dishonest claim by the son. He mentions that 15 people suffered from Melioidosis in 2004. but how many are actually NS men. Suggesting that this disease is decimating NS men or impacting the NS and SAF is not evident. For 99.9% of people, this is the first time that they even heard about it. The medical profession should step forward and make a statement.

    If Tony Tan has an modicum of self respect or a drop honesty still left in his blood, he should withdraw from the Presidency.[/QUOTE]
     

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