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Is Fear of Muslims Rational?

Hypocrite-The

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Old post/topic. Go refer my past post.
It has happened n will continue to happen if Isis is still around. Are u denying it did not happen? N if u say it is unislamic wat Isis had done, than u should launch a jihad against them for bring infidels, unfortunately it's the other religions which are infidels n not Isis. So basically you are a sympathiser of Isis
 

whoami

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
It has happened n will continue to happen if Isis is still around. Are u denying it did not happen? N if u say it is unislamic wat Isis had done, than u should launch a jihad against them for bring infidels, unfortunately it's the other religions which are infidels n not Isis. So basically you are a sympathiser of Isis
US sponsor of terrorism. So IS is a product of US. Many times told u. Still asking. Numbskull ah pek.

Oh ya...can rem how many time u took the drugs for shaking? Post fr here to show ur proud acheivement in btm?
 

Hypocrite-The

Alfrescian
Loyal
US sponsor of terrorism. So IS is a product of US. Many times told u. Still asking. Numbskull ah pek.

Oh ya...can rem how many time u took the drugs for shaking? Post fr here to show ur proud acheivement in btm?
BS. Isis is Islam n as usual mudslime tactics of blaming everyone but themselves.
 

Hypocrite-The

Alfrescian
Loyal
Another reason to fear mudslimes. They never take responsibility for anything.
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DONALD TRUMP'S AMERICA
Donald Trump's 9/11 criticism of Muslim congresswoman Ilhan Omar draws Democrats' ire
UPDATED ABOUT 2 HOURS AGO
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A triptych of profile photos of Omar, Trump and Pelosi
PHOTO Ilhan Omar's (left) comments about 9/11 attracted the attention of Donald Trump.
AP
United States President Donald Trump has come under criticism for a tweeted video that was edited to suggest Minnesota Democrat Ilhan Omar was dismissive of the significance of the September 11 terror attacks.

Key points:
Democrat Ilhan Omar was speaking about the erosion of Muslim-Americans' civic liberties since 9/11
Democrat presidential candidates have accused President Donald Trump of playing politics
Nancy Pelosi said it was wrong for Mr Trump "to fan the flames to make anyone less safe"
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the President "shouldn't use the painful images of 9/11 for a political attack", and implied the President could have compromised Ms Omar's safety.

The video pulls a snippet of Ms Omar's speech last month to the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), in which she described the 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Centre as "some people did something", as well as news footage of the hijacked planes hitting the towers.

Mr Trump on Friday tweeted: "WE WILL NEVER FORGET!"


Ms Omar's remark has drawn criticism largely from political opponents and conservatives. They say Ms Omar, one of the first Muslim women to serve in Congress, offered a flippant description of the assailants and the attacks on American soil that killed nearly 3,000 people.

Neither Mr Trump's tweet nor the video includes her full quote or the context of her comments.

Ms Omar told CAIR in Los Angeles that many Muslims saw their civil liberties eroded after the attacks and she advocated for activism.

"For far too long we have lived with the discomfort of being a second-class citizen and, frankly, I'm tired of it and every single Muslim in this country should be tired of it," she said in the March 23 speech, according to video posted online.

"CAIR was founded after 9/11 because they recognised that some people did something and that all of us were starting to lose access to our civil liberties."
CAIR was founded in 1994, according to its website, but its membership increased dramatically after the attacks.

Minnesota Democrat Ilhan Omar wears a purple headscarf and her head is turned towards the left
PHOTO Ilhan Omar is the subject of President Donald Trump's latest attack on Twitter.

AP: J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE
Many Republicans and conservative outlets expressed outrage at Ms Omar's remarks.

"First Member of Congress to ever describe terrorists who killed thousands of Americans on 9/11 as 'some people who did something,'" tweeted Texas Republican Dan Crenshaw, a retired Navy SEAL who lost his right eye in 2012 in an explosion in Afghanistan.

George W Bush made a very similar comment
Ms Pelosi said in a statement while she was in Germany visiting American troops that "the memory of 9/11 is sacred ground, and any discussion of it must be done with reverence".

"It is wrong for the President, as commander-in-chief, to fan the flames to make anyone less safe," she said.
Ms Omar does not seem to be backing down, tweeting a quote from former President George W Bush shortly after the attacks, when he said: "The people — and the people who knocked these buildings down will hear all of us soon!"


"Was Bush downplaying the terrorist attack?" Ms Omar tweeted. "What if he was a Muslim?"

Democrat presidential candidates throw support behind Omar
Several 2020 Democratic presidential candidates condemned Mr Trump's tweet.

"Someone has already been charged with a serious threat on Congresswoman Omar's life. The video the President chose to send out today will only incite more hate," Minnesota senator Amy Klobuchar said.

"You can disagree with her words — as I have done before — but this video is wrong. Enough."
Vermont senator Bernie Sanders said Ms Omar "won't back down to Trump's racism and hate, and neither will we".

And Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren accused Mr Trump "of inciting violence against a sitting congresswoman — and an entire group of Americans based on their religion".

Ms Omar has repeatedly pushed fellow Democrats into uncomfortable territory over Israel and the power of the Jewish state's influence in Washington.

She apologised for suggesting that politicians support Israel for pay and said she was not criticising Jewish people.

But she refused to take back a tweet in which she suggested that American supporters of Israel "pledge allegiance" to a foreign country.

Her comments sparked an ugly episode among House Democrats when they responded with a resolution condemning anti-Semitism became a broader declaration against all forms of bigotry.

AP

POSTED YESTERDAY AT 10:47PM
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Malaysia court rules non-Muslims cannot use 'Allah'
14 October 2013
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The court case has sparked debate in Muslim-majority Malaysia
A Malaysian court has ruled that non-Muslims cannot use the word Allah to refer to God, even in their own faiths, overturning a 2009 lower court ruling.

The appeals court said the term Allah must be exclusive to Islam or it could cause public disorder.

People of all faiths use the word Allah in Malay to refer to their Gods.

Christians argue they have used the word, which entered Malay from Arabic, to refer to their God for centuries and that the ruling violates their rights.

One Malaysian Christian woman said the ruling would affect the community greatly.

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"If we are prohibited from using the word Allah then we have to re-translate the whole Bible, if it comes to that," Ester Moiji from Sabah state told the BBC.

'Disappointed and dismayed'
The 2009 ruling sparked tensions, with churches and mosques attacked.

It came after the government said that a Catholic newspaper, The Herald, could not use the word in its Malay-language edition to describe the Christian God.

The newspaper sued, and a court ruled in their favour in December 2009. The government then launched an appeal.

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Upholding the appeal on Monday, chief judge Mohamed Apandi Ali said: "The usage of the word Allah is not an integral part of the faith in Christianity. The usage of the word will cause confusion in the community."

The Herald editor Reverend Lawrence Andrew said he was "disappointed and dismayed", and would appeal against the decision.

"It is a retrograde step in the development of law in relation to the fundamental liberty of religious minorities," he said.

The newspaper's supporters have argued that Malay-language Bibles have used Allah to refer to the Christian God since before Malaysia was formed as a federal state in 1963.

"Allah is a term in the Middle East and in Indonesia it is a term both for Christians and Muslims. You cannot say that in all of the sudden it is not an integral part. Malay language is a language that has many borrowed words, Allah also is a borrowed word."

However, some Muslim groups have said that the Christian use of the word Allah could be used to encourage Muslims to convert to Christianity.


Media captionEditor of Catholic Newspaper The Herald Lawrence Andrew: 'God is an integral part of every religion'
"Allah is not a Malay word. If they [non-Muslims] say they want to use a Malay word they should use Tuhan instead of Allah," Zainul Rijal Abu Bakar, a lawyer representing the government, told the BBC.

Dozens of churches and a few Muslim prayer halls were attacked and burned in the wake of the 2009 ruling, highlighting the intensity of feeling about issues of ethnicity and faith in Malaysia.

Some Malaysians believe the governing Malay-Muslim party is using the case to boost its Islamic credentials among voters, the BBC's Jennifer Pak reports from outside the court in Putrajaya.

Malay Muslims make up almost two-thirds of the country's population, but there are large Hindu and Christian communities.

Prime Minister Najib Razak's coalition won elections in May, but it was the coalition's worst result in more than half a century in power.
 

Hypocrite-The

Alfrescian
Loyal
For the last time. I added in 3 more. Total 4. But there are more. Go google, ah pek




Of course mudslime terrorist sympathisers will support libtards in creating garbage to cover up mudslime Terrorist activities. If Isis etc is not Islamic, how come mudslimes the world over don't launch a jihad against them?
 

Hypocrite-The

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For the last time. I added in 3 more. Total 4. But there are more. Go google, ah pek




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This file photo provided Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017 by the Syrian Civil Defense White Helmets, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, shows Civil Defense workers and Syrian citizens gathering after an airstrike hit a market in Maaret al-Numan in southern Idlib, Syria
This file photo provided Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017 by the Syrian Civil Defense White Helmets, which has been authenticated by AP reporting, shows Syrian citizens gathering after an airstrike in Idlib Syrian Civil Defense White Helmets via AP, File
Analysis How Assad Helped Create ISIS to Win in Syria and Got Away With the Crime of the Century
There 'won't be any Nuremberg-like trial of Assad and his associates,' says the last U.S. ambassador to Syria, Robert Ford

Alexander Griffing
07.10.2018 | 16:45
While Syria remains torn between Russian, American and Turkish interests, with world leaders working to avoid a bloodbath in the remaining pocket of resistance, one thing is certain: President Bashar Assad has won Syria’s devastating seven-year civil war.

To secure his victory, experts say, Assad helped incubate the extremism that led to the rise of the Islamic State and the further spread of jihadism in Syria – the very elements he now vows to destroy in Idlib, the last rebel enclave in the country and home to millions of civilians and refugees.

>> Israel faces a much bigger challenge in Syria than S-300s | Analysis

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Robert Ford, the ambassador to Syria under President Barack Obama and the last U.S. ambassador to the country, told Haaretz that Assad “will stay in power for as long as the eye can see,” and more importantly there “won’t be any Nuremberg-like trial of Assad and his associates.”


Furthermore, he says, not only will Assad not be held accountable for the use of chemical weapons or other wartime atrocities, but his allies Russia and Iran that helped him defeat the rebels won’t be able to bankroll the rebuilding of the war-ravaged country.

“The Syrian government lacks financial resources, and neither Russia nor Iran can provide much more than they already provide,” says Ford, now a fellow at the Middle East Institute in Washington and a professor at Yale.

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Former ambassador to Syria: U.S. can't change Assad regime CNN from 2014
Assad’s downfall seemed all but guaranteed at many points during the eight years since the Arab Spring began to topple Middle Eastern dictators. Yet Assad has now outlasted fellow despots like Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak and Libya’s Muammar Gadhafi, and also Western leaders like Obama and Britain’s David Cameron who once vowed to stop his bloodletting and drew red lines warning Assad against using chemical weapons or risk regime change.


Ford, who resigned in February 2014 to protest Obama’s alleged lack of policy against Assad, had regularly met with the rebels and wrote in The New York Times in June 2014 that while “these men were not angels … they acknowledged that they would ultimately have to fight Al-Qaida and the foreign jihadis.” But in the end it was Assad who ended up convincing much of the West that he was a better choice than the rebels to help battle the Islamic State and jihadism.

A new narrative

In 2011, months after the uprising against Assad began in Daraa and quickly started to destabilize the country, his regime released thousands of jihadists from Syria’s now infamous prisons.


Using a cold and pragmatic calculus, Assad fomented chaos and terror to discredit the opposition and ensure that the West wouldn't intervene against him. Syrian war expert Christopher Phillips details how Assad tied the opposition to jihadists in his comprehensive 2016 book "The Battle for Syria: International Rivalry in the New Middle East."

Phillips told Haaretz, “it is hard to tell just how successful the discrediting strategy was. Certainly the majority of Syrians who didn't flee or take up arms seemed to tacitly back Assad but was that because they didn't trust the opposition or because they feared the regime? It was probably a mixture of both.”

“In 2011, the majority of the current ISIS leadership was released from jail" by Assad, Mohammed Al-Saud, a Syrian dissident with the National Coalition for Syrian Revolutionary and Opposition Forces, told Newsweek in 2014. “No one in the regime has ever admitted this, or explained why.”

The leaders of two major Islamist groups, Hassan Aboud of Ahrar al-Sham and Zahran Alloush of Jaysh al-Islam, were also both in Assad’s prisons in early 2011. Additionally, as the Islamic State began to take root in Syria and spread into Iraq, Assad let the group grow. Phillips wrote in The Atlantic in August that this “was partly pragmatic, as ISIS was in the peripheral east while other rebels threatened the western heartlands, but it was also strategic.”

“The regime did not just open the door to the prisons and let these extremists out, it facilitated them in their work, in their creation of armed brigades,” a former member of Syria’s Military Intelligence Directorate, one of more than a dozen of Syria’s secretive intelligence agencies, told Abu Dhabi-based The National in 2014.

Assad “concocted a legitimizing narrative: It portrayed the oppositionists as violent, foreign, sectarian Islamists,” Phillips wrote, “in the hope that only jihadists and his regime would be left for Syrians and the world to choose from.”

Assad’s survival and Hezbollah’s lasting presence

As the war progressed, Hezbollah, Iran and later Russia intervened militarily to help Assad, while the United States, Turkey and the Kurds fought in Syria and set up military bases to battle the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq. Hezbollah was “absolutely key” to Assad’s survival, Phillips says.

>> Read more: How Russian Military Support Is Secretly Airlifted to Syria's Assad | Putin's Private Army in Syria: Officially Illegal, the Kremlin Denies It, but the Evidence Is in the Numbers

Hezbollah members were the first foreign fighters, in 2012, to enter on Assad’s side and “led the way in key battles like Qusayr and in reorganizing the army and pro-Assad Syrian Democratic Forces,” Phillips told Haaretz. “Iran’s Soleimani may have been the brains, but Hezbollah were the trusted implementers,” he added, referring to the head of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards’ Quds force.

Iran has long viewed its presence in Syria as key in its desire to establish a land bridge between Tehran and Beirut, a strategic asset it hopes would thwart both Saudi Arabia and Israel, its regional rivals.

Another major factor that allowed for Assad’s survival was the strength of prewar Syria’s government. Phillips wrote that in 2000, when Assad came to power, he had “inherited a coup-proofed regime” from his father, Hafez Assad.

The structure Hafez built lasts to this day, and as Ford adds, it's the reason “neither Russia nor Iran control the Syrian power elite inner circle and that circle has stayed loyal to Assad consistently through the civil war.” Most of Syria’s top security positions are packed with Alawites, the sect the Assad family belongs to, which is only about 10 percent of the predominantly Sunni population. While Assad’s army suffered mass desertions and lost well over half its soldiers in the first four years of the war, the power structure around Assad stayed loyal.

What’s next for Syria?

Assad’s survival has left Syria in ruins; the country is now “weaker, poorer and less influential in the region,” Ford says. Assad's travel is now restricted to “friendly” countries, lest he face extradition.

Russia, while reeling from its own economic woes, is working behind the scenes to secure funding to rebuild Syria. “Russia wants to show the world that the Syrian civil war is largely over, and refugees returning would be one indicator that the Assad government has won its victory,” Ford says.

Syrian government forces are preparing a phased offensive in the province of Idlib and surrounding areas Reuters
The Trump administration, however, has made clear that Washington will not help fund the rebuilding effort, and U.S. sanctions make foreign investment very difficult in the country.

The Russian government even went so far as to release a list from its "refugee coordination center" at Khmeimim air base in Syria claiming that 900,000 refugees could return to Syria soon from Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey. Turkey is amassing troops near Idlib and fears a mass exodus from the region toward its border.

But Ford says Syria’s basic infrastructure can't handle a returning population. Recent estimates to rebuild Syria range from $250 billion to $400 billion, according to AP. “Little of Homs and Aleppo cities have been rebuilt even though fighting in those cities ended years ago," Ford says. "Where would refugees live? What jobs would they have? What about clean water and electricity and heat for winter?”

As a result, Russia has been lobbying Germany and France and even Turkey to foot the bill to rebuild Syria, while Trump has been pressing his allies not to support Assad financially. Iran’s indefinite presence in Syria is also all but certain to keep U.S. funding out and continue to isolate Syria both economically and diplomatically.

Assad’s ruthless victory has created one of the largest refugee crises since World War II, one that has brought out demons in many Western countries now embracing anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim politics.

The reconstruction and repatriation effort faces another problem – many refugees may not want to return. Syria’s security services are checking information on each refugee and, according to Ford, there are stories in the media of some people being detained or promptly sent into military service upon their return. Russia, Assad and Turkey have agreed for the time being not to enter Idlib and destroy the jihadists there at the expense of civilian lives, delaying the final military push that most observers still see as inevitable.

>> Read more: After ISIS Loses Its Capital, Focus Turns to Strengthening Global Terror Network | The Rise and Fall of ISIS: From Organization to State

Additionally, a recent UN report estimated that between 20,000 and 30,000 Islamic State fighters remain in Syria and Iraq – despite Trump’s recent declarations of victory over the group. The Islamic State, recent events indicate, remains both an international and internal threat, and Iran even declared Wednesday that it killed 40 ISIS leaders with six missile strikes in retaliation for the September 22 attack on a military parade in Iran that killed 25 people, nearly half of them members of the Revolutionary Guards.

So while Assad may soon finally defeat the rebels who sought to tear down his regime and regain his territory (except the 28 percent held by the U.S.-backed Kurds in the northeast), he'll be left with a country facing a severe humanitarian crisis, few resources to rebuild with and well-armed and trained jihadists still gunning to end his secular rule through terror.


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Singaporean charged for supporting publication of Islamic State propaganda




SingaporeSingaporean charged for supporting publication of Islamic State propaganda
image: data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAAAAACH5BAEKAAEALAAAAAABAAEAAAICTAEAOw==
Photo illustration of handcuffs. (Photo: Jeremy Long)
15 Apr 2019 04:47PM(Updated: 15 Apr 2019 05:38PM)
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SINGAPORE: A 35-year-old Singaporean man was charged on Monday (Apr 15) for providing money to support the publication of Islamic State (IS) propaganda for terrorist purposes, the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) said in a media release.
Imran Kassim has been detained since August 2017 under the Internal Security Act (ISA) for intending to undertake armed violence overseas.

READ: 2 Singaporeans arrested under ISA for terror-related activities: MHA

An investigation by the Commercial Affairs Department also found that he had given S$450 to a man in Turkey for the publication of IS propaganda, said MHA.

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According to court documents, Imran allegedly transferred the money on Oct 31, 2014, through Western Union Global Network to a man named Mohamad Alsaied Alhmidan.
"This act of providing money in support of terrorist purposes is a serious offence, regardless of the amount, under the Terrorism (Suppression of Financing) Act," said MHA.

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If Imran is convicted, the detention order against him will be cancelled, and he will serve the jail term imposed by the court, MHA said.
"To prevent him spreading his radical ideas to other inmates, he will be held separately, and will continue to undergo rehabilitation whilst serving his prison sentence," the ministry added.
At the end of the sentence, an assessment will be made to see if he has been successfully rehabilitated.
"If he remains a threat, he may be detained further under the ISA," MHA said.
Anyone found guilty of providing property and services for terrorist purposes may be jailed for up to 10 years and fined up to S$500,000.
Anyone with information of such activities should inform the authorities promptly, said MHA.
HISTORY OF PRO-ISLAMIC STATE BELIEFS
It was reported in 2017 that Imran, a managing director of a logistics company, was radicalised by IS propaganda.
He had admitted that he was prepared to attack Singapore Armed Forces personnel deployed in the global coalition to fight IS, or hold them hostages to demand ransom from the Singapore Government and use the money to boost the militant group's finances.
According to MHA, Imran had also tried to join IS in Syria on at least two occasions.
In February 2014, he travelled to Syria to oversee the delivery of humanitarian aid to a refugee camp that was arranged by the logistics company he worked for. He tried to slip away from his hosts at the refugee camp but was unsuccessful.
In March 2015, Imran contacted a pro-IS foreign contact to facilitate his entry into Syria to join the militant group but did not receive any reply.
He had also used social media to galvanise support for IS and had tried, unsuccessfully, to influence his friends with radical views.
Source: CNA/aa(gs)
Tagged Topics
 
US sponsor of terrorism. So IS is a product of US. Many times told u. Still asking. Numbskull ah pek.

Oh ya...can rem how many time u took the drugs for shaking? Post fr here to show ur proud acheivement in btm?
hey bro, while I agree with you that IS s a product of US, how can you tahan they call themselves Islam? If I were you, I cannot tahan that at all. I would be outraged. :mad:
 

whoami

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
hey bro, while I agree with you that IS s a product of US, how can you tahan they call themselves Islam? If I were you, I cannot tahan that at all. I would be outraged. :mad:
Bro...those IS were bribed. Google n u wiil find the answers. By doing tat so as to justified the war on terrorism. Had US not invaded Iraq tere wont be IS. But US will still cause chaos n invade other ME countries cos of oil. Al Queda also created by US. U see the agenda of US? Afghanistan have rich natural resources. Tats y US refuse to back off completely. US cant win the war on Afghanistan. Those r hard core mujaheedin aka taleban...trained by warmonger US.
 
Bro...those IS were bribed. Google n u wiil find the answers. By doing tat so as to justified the war on terrorism. Had US not invaded Iraq tere wont be IS. But US will still cause chaos n invade other ME countries cos of oil. Al Queda also created by US. U see the agenda of US? Afghanistan have rich natural resources. Tats y US refuse to back off completely. US cant win the war on Afghanistan. Those r hard core mujaheedin aka taleban...trained by warmonger US.
yeah, I know all that. but if these people call themselves muslims, how can you tahan? I know I certainly can't. If I have no obligations in my life, I would volunteer to fight against them and call myself something like real muslim against impostor. Die also happy. I don't understand how so many muslims can stand to be associated with that. Am I missing something?
 

whoami

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
yeah, I know all that. but if these people call themselves muslims, how can you tahan? I know I certainly can't. If I have no obligations in my life, I would volunteer to fight against them and call myself something like real muslim against impostor. Die also happy. I don't understand how so many muslims can stand to be associated with that. Am I missing something?
Bro..tere r 1.8 billion muslims. Just like xtians or any other religion tere r bound to have rotten apples. Hypocrites. Many times mentioned in the Quran. They r willing to sell away their religion for few pence. Fight IS. But i m not young n i dont know hw to use rifles.:smile:
 
Bro..tere r 1.8 billion muslims. Just like xtians or any other religion tere r bound to have rotten apples. Hypocrites. Many times mentioned in the Quran. They r willing to sell away their religion for few pence. Fight IS. But i m not young n i dont know hw to use rifles.:smile:
Ah yes typical mudslimes attitude. Everyone else's fault except their own
 
Last edited:
Bro..tere r 1.8 billion muslims. Just like xtians or any other religion tere r bound to have rotten apples. Hypocrites. Many times mentioned in the Quran. They r willing to sell away their religion for few pence. Fight IS. But i m not young n i dont know hw to use rifles.:smile:
only a suggestion, don't need to have rifles, just need to denounce can already.
 

whoami

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
only a suggestion, don't need to have rifles, just need to denounce can already.
Actually we did. Friday sermon u will hear our Imams telling the congregation to denounce terrorism. Tere r banners too placed outside some masjid. U nid to mix around with fellow muslims in sinkieland. Like those non muslims volunteers (vice versa) doing charitable/welfare work.
 
Actually we did. Friday sermon u will hear our Imams telling the congregation to denounce terrorism. Tere r banners too placed outside some masjid. U nid to mix around with fellow muslims in sinkieland. Like those non muslims volunteers (vice versa) doing charitable/welfare work.
Why don't launch a jihad against Isis if it is against Islam?
 
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