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Chitchat GINGER is good for your health...

AhMeng

Alfrescian (Inf- Comp)
Asset
#1
5 Health And Beauty Benefits Of Ginger That Are Seriously Impressive
BY MARISSA MILLER December 29, 2017
Just so you know: While Women's Health editors independently select all products we feature, product links may be from affiliate partners. That means if you buy something, Women's Health gets a portion of the proceeds

GETTY IMAGES

Your grandmother might be onto something when she advises you to drink ginger tea at the first sign of a cold. While the ancient root has long been touted a sick-day panacea in traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine, the overall health benefits of ginger are wide-ranging, according to Karen Ansel, R.D.N. and author of Healing Superfoods for Anti-Aging: Stay Younger Live Longer. Plus, if you feel good on the inside, you’re bound to look fierce on the outside, too.

Just one word to the wise: “Having a couple of tablespoons of fresh or powdered ginger a day is fine,” says Christy Brissette, R.D., and president of 80 Twenty Nutrition. “If you’d like to take more, speak to your doctor, as ginger can interfere with some medications.”

Because of its versatility (and, quite frankly, its intimidating tree bark-like appearance), it might be difficult to know where to start when you're staring down a ginger root. Before you blindly grab every super-root from the farmer’s market, make sure you’re choosing the right piece. Ansel says to ensure your fresh ginger is smooth with unblemished skin, and not dried out. You can store it unpeeled in your fridge wrapped in plastic for three weeks, or in your freezer for six months. Because of its strong, peppery taste and aroma, chop it finely before tossing it into recipes. Peel it thoroughly so its thick, rough skin doesn’t make any surprise appearances in your cooking.

For some morning pep in your step, add half a teaspoon of fresh ginger to a smoothie. Brissette also swears by the combination of crushed ginger and pear. Or, mix it into fruit salad. For ginger tea, steep a tablespoon of thinly sliced ginger in boiling water for 10 to 20 minutes. For an easy side dish, Ansel recommends skipping the garlic and sautéeing it with spinach and kale (your significant other will thank you). Whisk a teaspoon of chopped ginger with one-quarter cup fresh orange juice, two tablespoons of canola oil, and a teaspoon of Dijon mustard for a sweet and spicy salad dressing. The opportunities are endless when it comes to this spice.

Now that your pantry is stocked with the stuff (go ahead—we’ll wait), here are some other great health and beauty benefits of ginger:


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1
IT WILL MAKE YOUR SKIN GLOW
Ansel says ginger contains substances known as gingerols that quash inflammation and turn off pain-causing compounds in the body. The anti-inflammatory benefits can also help soothe red, irritated skin. A promising study in rats also found that eating a combination of curcumin and ginger helped skin improve its appearance and function and helped it heal faster.

Eat more of these 7 foods for beautiful skin:


GETTY IMAGES


2
IT FIGHTS CANCER AND SIGNS OF AGING
Ginger is also packed with antioxidants that help protect the body from cancer, particularly ovarian cancer, says Ansel. Antioxidants also protect the skin from free-radical damage that affects collagen production, helping you look younger.

RELATED: PEOPLE SAY THIS POPULAR BLENDER IS EXPLODING AND GIVING THEM SERIOUS INJURIES

GETTY IMAGES


3
IT CURES NAUSEA AND BLOATING
A cup of ginger tea could help your stomach empty faster so food doesn't just sit there after an indulgent meal, according to Brissette. It'll help calm your stomach and stave off bloating and gas. In general, ginger is also a research-backed remedy for nausea, whether you’re on a bumpy road trip, recovering from chemotherapy, or cursing pregnancy’s morning-sickness symptoms. (Hit the reset button—and burn fat like crazy with The Body Clock Diet!)


GETTY IMAGES


4
IT LOWERS BAD CHOLESTEROL
Brissette says ginger can help lower LDL cholesterol levels (the bad kind!), reducing your risk of heart disease. What’s more is that its blood-thinning properties could help prevent the formation of blood clots, reducing your risk of heart and stroke. She warns that if you already take blood-thinning medications, check with your doctor before having more ginger.

RELATED: THE 8 TYPES OF PEOPLE MOST LIKELY TO GET A BLOOD CLOT

GETTY IMAGES


5
IT FIGHTS COLDS
So why do we suck on ginger lozenges when we’re sick? The same gingerols that fight inflammation also have antimicrobial and antifungal properties to help fight infections and boost your immunity. Steal Brissette’s speedy-recovery go-to: Mix hot water with two tablespoons of fresh grated ginger, juice of one lemon, and half a tablespoon of honey. Or, toss a teaspoon into chicken soup for some added cold-fighting benefits.
 

ginfugly

Alfrescian
Loyal
#5
5 Health And Beauty Benefits Of Ginger That Are Seriously Impressive
BY MARISSA MILLER December 29, 2017
Just so you know: While Women's Health editors independently select all products we feature, product links may be from affiliate partners. That means if you buy something, Women's Health gets a portion of the proceeds

GETTY IMAGES

Your grandmother might be onto something when she advises you to drink ginger tea at the first sign of a cold. While the ancient root has long been touted a sick-day panacea in traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine, the overall health benefits of ginger are wide-ranging, according to Karen Ansel, R.D.N. and author of Healing Superfoods for Anti-Aging: Stay Younger Live Longer. Plus, if you feel good on the inside, you’re bound to look fierce on the outside, too.

Just one word to the wise: “Having a couple of tablespoons of fresh or powdered ginger a day is fine,” says Christy Brissette, R.D., and president of 80 Twenty Nutrition. “If you’d like to take more, speak to your doctor, as ginger can interfere with some medications.”

Because of its versatility (and, quite frankly, its intimidating tree bark-like appearance), it might be difficult to know where to start when you're staring down a ginger root. Before you blindly grab every super-root from the farmer’s market, make sure you’re choosing the right piece. Ansel says to ensure your fresh ginger is smooth with unblemished skin, and not dried out. You can store it unpeeled in your fridge wrapped in plastic for three weeks, or in your freezer for six months. Because of its strong, peppery taste and aroma, chop it finely before tossing it into recipes. Peel it thoroughly so its thick, rough skin doesn’t make any surprise appearances in your cooking.

For some morning pep in your step, add half a teaspoon of fresh ginger to a smoothie. Brissette also swears by the combination of crushed ginger and pear. Or, mix it into fruit salad. For ginger tea, steep a tablespoon of thinly sliced ginger in boiling water for 10 to 20 minutes. For an easy side dish, Ansel recommends skipping the garlic and sautéeing it with spinach and kale (your significant other will thank you). Whisk a teaspoon of chopped ginger with one-quarter cup fresh orange juice, two tablespoons of canola oil, and a teaspoon of Dijon mustard for a sweet and spicy salad dressing. The opportunities are endless when it comes to this spice.

Now that your pantry is stocked with the stuff (go ahead—we’ll wait), here are some other great health and beauty benefits of ginger:


GETTY IMAGES

1
IT WILL MAKE YOUR SKIN GLOW
Ansel says ginger contains substances known as gingerols that quash inflammation and turn off pain-causing compounds in the body. The anti-inflammatory benefits can also help soothe red, irritated skin. A promising study in rats also found that eating a combination of curcumin and ginger helped skin improve its appearance and function and helped it heal faster.

Eat more of these 7 foods for beautiful skin:


GETTY IMAGES


2
IT FIGHTS CANCER AND SIGNS OF AGING
Ginger is also packed with antioxidants that help protect the body from cancer, particularly ovarian cancer, says Ansel. Antioxidants also protect the skin from free-radical damage that affects collagen production, helping you look younger.

RELATED: PEOPLE SAY THIS POPULAR BLENDER IS EXPLODING AND GIVING THEM SERIOUS INJURIES

GETTY IMAGES


3
IT CURES NAUSEA AND BLOATING
A cup of ginger tea could help your stomach empty faster so food doesn't just sit there after an indulgent meal, according to Brissette. It'll help calm your stomach and stave off bloating and gas. In general, ginger is also a research-backed remedy for nausea, whether you’re on a bumpy road trip, recovering from chemotherapy, or cursing pregnancy’s morning-sickness symptoms. (Hit the reset button—and burn fat like crazy with The Body Clock Diet!)


GETTY IMAGES


4
IT LOWERS BAD CHOLESTEROL
Brissette says ginger can help lower LDL cholesterol levels (the bad kind!), reducing your risk of heart disease. What’s more is that its blood-thinning properties could help prevent the formation of blood clots, reducing your risk of heart and stroke. She warns that if you already take blood-thinning medications, check with your doctor before having more ginger.

RELATED: THE 8 TYPES OF PEOPLE MOST LIKELY TO GET A BLOOD CLOT

GETTY IMAGES


5
IT FIGHTS COLDS
So why do we suck on ginger lozenges when we’re sick? The same gingerols that fight inflammation also have antimicrobial and antifungal properties to help fight infections and boost your immunity. Steal Brissette’s speedy-recovery go-to: Mix hot water with two tablespoons of fresh grated ginger, juice of one lemon, and half a tablespoon of honey. Or, toss a teaspoon into chicken soup for some added cold-fighting benefits.
more impotent is, will it make your lanjiao eh ngeh boh?
 

UltimaOnline

Alfrescian (InfP)
Generous Asset
#6


Figging
is the practice of inserting a piece of skinned ginger root into the human anus or the vagina in order to generate an acute burning sensation. Historically this was a method of punishment, but has since been adopted as a pratice of BDSM. The term "figging" comes from the 19th century word "feaguing."

This method of physical punishment was first used as a form of discipline on female slaves in Ancient Greece, and during the Victorian era it was unofficially used by the Holy Roman Empire as a method of disciplinary action or corporal punishment for female prisoners. The detainee was restrained to varying degrees in order to restrict mobility while the sensation grew from uncomfortable to extreme.

The ginger, which is skinned and often carved into the shape of a butt plug, causes an intense burning sensation, and often intolerable discomfort to the subject. The effect reaches climax within two to five minutes after insertion, and persists for around thirty minutes before gradually easing. The ginger, after use, can be further skinned, and used to extend the experience; each fresh application of ginger root refreshes the duration of the sensations in the subject.

If the person being figged tightens the muscles of the anus, the sensation becomes more intense. For this reason it is often used in caning to prevent clenching of the buttocks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figging
 

AhMeng

Alfrescian (Inf- Comp)
Asset
#9


Figging
is the practice of inserting a piece of skinned ginger root into the human anus or the vagina in order to generate an acute burning sensation. Historically this was a method of punishment, but has since been adopted as a pratice of BDSM. The term "figging" comes from the 19th century word "feaguing."

This method of physical punishment was first used as a form of discipline on female slaves in Ancient Greece, and during the Victorian era it was unofficially used by the Holy Roman Empire as a method of disciplinary action or corporal punishment for female prisoners. The detainee was restrained to varying degrees in order to restrict mobility while the sensation grew from uncomfortable to extreme.

The ginger, which is skinned and often carved into the shape of a butt plug, causes an intense burning sensation, and often intolerable discomfort to the subject. The effect reaches climax within two to five minutes after insertion, and persists for around thirty minutes before gradually easing. The ginger, after use, can be further skinned, and used to extend the experience; each fresh application of ginger root refreshes the duration of the sensations in the subject.

If the person being figged tightens the muscles of the anus, the sensation becomes more intense. For this reason it is often used in caning to prevent clenching of the buttocks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figging
Wah piang, like that smelly jeebye also become no smell liao..Lol :biggrin:
 
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