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All the ministers, MPs, PAP grass roots, govt bodies will now want to por Shanti

UltimaOnline

Alfrescian (InfP)
Generous Asset
And they conveniently forgot about him when he became a fat and slow swimmer.

ad_215342424.jpg
 

cat

Stupidman
Loyal
after ccpcheena for table tennis, now pap relies on ceca indians for athletics.
quite shameful country which cannot produce own athletes
 

laksaboy

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
Just give it some time, they will discard her as they had discarded previous athletes. No need for any particular scandal to happen.

PAP = mini CCP, sporting excellence and politics are interlocked whether you like it or not. 体育 = 政治挂帅
 

LITTLEREDDOT

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset

Singapore’s sprint queen Shanti Pereira comes home to ‘nice, warm welcome’​

photo1696489666.jpeg

Shanti Pereira receiving a hug from her uncle Bernard Pereira upon arriving at Changi Airport on Oct 5, 2023. ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM

photo1696487500.jpeg

Shanti Pereira welcomed by her boyfriend Tan Zong Yang. ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM

photo1696487484.jpeg

Shanti Pereira receiving a warm welcome from her aunt Lucy Shaw upon arriving at Changi Airport on Oct 5, 2023. ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM


deepan.png

Deepanraj Ganesan
Oct 4, 2023

SINGAPORE – On Thursday afternoon, a crowd of 70 people gathered at Changi Airport for what was no ordinary arrival.
It was the homecoming of Singapore’s Asian Games gold medalist, as sprinter Shanti Pereira returned home after an inspiring and dominant victory in Hangzhou.
Clutching notebooks, pens, flowers, garlands, posters and their mobile phones, the supporters were all eager for a photo, a wefie, an autograph from the golden girl, the history maker.
For those who were not in the know, like the travellers who came through Changi Airport T1 arrival hall, they were taken aback by the sizeable media crew and crowd that had gathered. Some were heard asking who the wait was for, to be told “the Asian Games gold medalist is arriving”.
And then she stepped into the arrival hall with a big smile on her face – and her gold and silver medals around her neck – to the cheers and applause from fans, family, friends and officials.
The champion was back. The newly crowned Asian sprint queen, who ended Singapore’s 49-year wait for a gold medal in Asiad track and field on Monday, when she won the women’s 200m gold.


photo1696488559.jpeg

Shanti Pereira posing with her medals. ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM
For those who had caught her race at home while perched on the edge of their seats in suspense, there was nothing like seeing their idol in the flesh.

Pereira was swarmed by fans and she obliged their requests, signing autographs and posing for photos.
Speaking to the media, Shanti said: “It’s a lot! It’s really nice to see everyone really excited and a lot of my family members are here as well. It’s a nice, warm welcome back home.
“I am going to have some rest first. Rest and recovery for the rest of this month and I am back to general preparation work for the rest of the year and I will probably start the (new) season in March or April next year.”
photo1696488498_0.jpeg

Shanti Pereira speaking to the media at Changi Airport on Oct 5, 2023. ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM
The hope, for the athletics fraternity, is for Pereira’s achievement to leave a lasting impact on Singapore sport.
And it is why Singapore Athletics president Lien Choong Luen is hoping that come 2029 at the home SEA Games, new heroes will take a step forward in their journey to become the next Shanti Pereira.
Lien said: “Shanti and her coach Luis (Cunha) put in months of hard work, competing overseas and clocking many hours just to shave fractions of a second. This is the hard graft that all our athletes and coaches put themselves through and I hope these performances will encourage young athletes watching at home to similarly commit themselves to aiming for excellence.

Calling on schools to encourage students to take part in their annual sports days, Lien added: “2029 is just six years away, and I am making an open call to every young girl and boy that loves to run, jump, throw to join us. And for parents to support their athletic dream to go as far as they can - perhaps one day to an Asian Games medal or more.”
Echoing his call, Pereira added: “I really hope my story can somehow inspire not just track and field athletes but people from every sport who are thinking of pursuing it a bit more seriously than they are now.
“For me, I found something that I love to do quite early on and I just worked hard at it, pushed for it and I didnt give up because this is what I wanted to do. If anyone else is feeling the same way as me, I say go for it, don’t be afraid to dream big. It does not have to be a scary thing, but you have to put in hard work and sacrifice a lot of things to reach the goal and get what you want.”
With her goal of an Asian gold attained, Pereira will continue to dream big for herself, and for Singapore.
 

LITTLEREDDOT

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset

After a golden win, a glowing Shanti Pereira chases another dream​

rohit_brijnath.png

Rohit Brijnath
Assistant Sports Editor
2023100445424390img0425.jpg

Shanti Pereira won the 200m at the Asian Games and now she wants to go faster. ST PHOTO: MARK CHEONG

Oct 4, 2023

After the golden moment, there’s a glow. After the goal’s been chased and caught, there’s a lightness. After expectation has been met and pressure wrestled to the ground, there’s a satisfaction.
You can see it in Shanti Pereira’s face.
It’s Wednesday evening in a corner of the press room and she’s laughing. No, she doesn’t know how many text messages she’s got. “Some are still unopened. Because it’s so many. I’m slowly going through them. It’s a lot of overwhelming support from back home.”
Yes, she knows how many new Instagram followers she has. Used to be 12,000. Now it’s almost 18,000. “Earlier this year,” she says, ‘I was growing in the number of followers and then my teammates were pressuring me to go get a blue tick. I said OK, I’ll do it once I hit 10(k). And then I hit 10. Then I said, when I hit 15 I’ll do it. Then I kind of skip it ... and my teammate is just like, give me your phone I’ll do it for you.”
But no, it’s not done yet.
After the golden moment, fame comes like a gentle wave. The followers, the interviews, the wefies, this young life reshaped in 23.03 seconds. She’ll still be herself and yet she’ll be forever changed.
Next to her is sitting the thoughtful Portuguese perfectionist, Luis Cunha. So has he already told you what you didn’t do well?

“Yeah, sort of,” she says. “Like the ending wasn’t really my usual ending. I end stronger usually. I was slowing down a lot, maybe towards the end. But usually I’m quite composed all the way to the end”.
The proper race debrief hasn’t happened yet, but Cunha will watch the race and re-watch it and note every detail. It’s his job to nitpick, to challenge, to make her faster still. After the golden moment, ambition doesn’t die.
The faster she goes, the harder it becomes to slice off shards of a second. Every fraction cut is hard labour. Still, how fast would she like to go, even if it’s just an idea, a fantasy, a longing out there in the distance.


“I mean, it will be a dream for sure, to let’s say, for the 100 meters (to go) sub-11 seconds. That will be a dream. It’s a very big stretch. (Shaving off ) .2 seconds is a lot in the 100m (her best is 11.2). (And shaving off) .57 is a lot in the 200 (her best is 22.57). Yeah, it’d be a dream. A dream come true if I were to go sub-22 seconds ever in my life.”
2023100273858650img0314_1.jpg

Shanti Pereira clocked 23.03 seconds to claim the gold. ST PHOTO: MARK CHEONG
But quickly she adds a cautionary note.
“I know it’s very, very, very hard to reach.”
But fast isn’t just a time, it’s a place, it’s a position in an elite gathering. “It was a dream,” she says, “to be in the World Championship semi-finals. Did that. Now I have to see how the next season will pan out. But hopefully an Olympic semi-final in a better position than from where I was at the world champs this year. I was in 17th position (200) and 31st for the 100. So a better position.”

After the golden moment, an athlete sees another figure in the mirror. An updated, refined version of herself. Because victory wasn’t just over everyone else but herself, the moment, demons, the past. This position she found herself in, favourite to win a race at the Asian Games, this was unusual, new and loaded with pressure and she met it beautifully.
“I feel,” she says, “I handled (the pressure) pretty well. I’ve been in this position before, not this particular specific position, but I’ve been in a position where I’m the favourite, and I’m expected to win. And I remember how I handled it back then. I was just so scared of all the pressure from everywhere and the expectations.”
But this time, she says, “Now I’m saying I’ve never been in this position before and I’m just truly embracing it. And just thanking everybody that has put me in this position.” And you could see this poise in her run and you can hear this assuredness in her voice.
“I’m at the athlete’s village and I got people on the day of the competition coming up to me to say, ‘So first, ah, later’. If it was me, years ago, I would have taken that as a huge pressure point, but I didn’t this time around”. She just grins and says she told them, “You’ll see”.
And we did.
On the podium, as she wept to the music of the national anthem, when life and her breathing had slowed down, when there was nothing left to achieve but only to be hailed, it was only then that it sank in. “Yeah, I just did that, you know?” The next morning when she awoke, she was that simplest of things. “Happy.”
After the golden moment, you see, life has a shine.
 

oliverlee

Alfrescian
Loyal
They will be rewarding her with $300k. Surely they think they own her now. The same way they thought they had owned that lanjiao swimming one hit wonder until he turned around and said “suck my dick”
 

JohnTan

Alfrescian (InfP)
Generous Asset
in the latest population data, only 61% are citizens
of which, we can safely estimate that 50% or less are local-born.

assuming 1/2 are males, that means only 1/4 of our population served NS.

1/4 of our population is militarized then. That's a very high percentage.
 

JohnTan

Alfrescian (InfP)
Generous Asset

Singapore’s sprint queen Shanti Pereira comes home to ‘nice, warm welcome’​

photo1696489666.jpeg

Shanti Pereira receiving a hug from her uncle Bernard Pereira upon arriving at Changi Airport on Oct 5, 2023. ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM

photo1696487500.jpeg

Shanti Pereira welcomed by her boyfriend Tan Zong Yang. ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM

photo1696487484.jpeg

Shanti Pereira receiving a warm welcome from her aunt Lucy Shaw upon arriving at Changi Airport on Oct 5, 2023. ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM


deepan.png

Deepanraj Ganesan
Oct 4, 2023

SINGAPORE – On Thursday afternoon, a crowd of 70 people gathered at Changi Airport for what was no ordinary arrival.
It was the homecoming of Singapore’s Asian Games gold medalist, as sprinter Shanti Pereira returned home after an inspiring and dominant victory in Hangzhou.
Clutching notebooks, pens, flowers, garlands, posters and their mobile phones, the supporters were all eager for a photo, a wefie, an autograph from the golden girl, the history maker.
For those who were not in the know, like the travellers who came through Changi Airport T1 arrival hall, they were taken aback by the sizeable media crew and crowd that had gathered. Some were heard asking who the wait was for, to be told “the Asian Games gold medalist is arriving”.
And then she stepped into the arrival hall with a big smile on her face – and her gold and silver medals around her neck – to the cheers and applause from fans, family, friends and officials.
The champion was back. The newly crowned Asian sprint queen, who ended Singapore’s 49-year wait for a gold medal in Asiad track and field on Monday, when she won the women’s 200m gold.


photo1696488559.jpeg

Shanti Pereira posing with her medals. ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM
For those who had caught her race at home while perched on the edge of their seats in suspense, there was nothing like seeing their idol in the flesh.

Pereira was swarmed by fans and she obliged their requests, signing autographs and posing for photos.
Speaking to the media, Shanti said: “It’s a lot! It’s really nice to see everyone really excited and a lot of my family members are here as well. It’s a nice, warm welcome back home.
“I am going to have some rest first. Rest and recovery for the rest of this month and I am back to general preparation work for the rest of the year and I will probably start the (new) season in March or April next year.”
photo1696488498_0.jpeg

Shanti Pereira speaking to the media at Changi Airport on Oct 5, 2023. ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM
The hope, for the athletics fraternity, is for Pereira’s achievement to leave a lasting impact on Singapore sport.
And it is why Singapore Athletics president Lien Choong Luen is hoping that come 2029 at the home SEA Games, new heroes will take a step forward in their journey to become the next Shanti Pereira.
Lien said: “Shanti and her coach Luis (Cunha) put in months of hard work, competing overseas and clocking many hours just to shave fractions of a second. This is the hard graft that all our athletes and coaches put themselves through and I hope these performances will encourage young athletes watching at home to similarly commit themselves to aiming for excellence.

Calling on schools to encourage students to take part in their annual sports days, Lien added: “2029 is just six years away, and I am making an open call to every young girl and boy that loves to run, jump, throw to join us. And for parents to support their athletic dream to go as far as they can - perhaps one day to an Asian Games medal or more.”
Echoing his call, Pereira added: “I really hope my story can somehow inspire not just track and field athletes but people from every sport who are thinking of pursuing it a bit more seriously than they are now.
“For me, I found something that I love to do quite early on and I just worked hard at it, pushed for it and I didnt give up because this is what I wanted to do. If anyone else is feeling the same way as me, I say go for it, don’t be afraid to dream big. It does not have to be a scary thing, but you have to put in hard work and sacrifice a lot of things to reach the goal and get what you want.”
With her goal of an Asian gold attained, Pereira will continue to dream big for herself, and for Singapore.

Shanti's chink boyfriend doesn't seem to be doing so well as a runner. Hardly hear of him in the news.

Screenshot-2023-07-10-at-4.06.33-PM.png
 

k1976

Alfrescian
Loyal

After a golden win, a glowing Shanti Pereira chases another dream​

rohit_brijnath.png

Rohit Brijnath
Assistant Sports Editor
2023100445424390img0425.jpg

Shanti Pereira won the 200m at the Asian Games and now she wants to go faster. ST PHOTO: MARK CHEONG

Oct 4, 2023

After the golden moment, there’s a glow. After the goal’s been chased and caught, there’s a lightness. After expectation has been met and pressure wrestled to the ground, there’s a satisfaction.
You can see it in Shanti Pereira’s face.
It’s Wednesday evening in a corner of the press room and she’s laughing. No, she doesn’t know how many text messages she’s got. “Some are still unopened. Because it’s so many. I’m slowly going through them. It’s a lot of overwhelming support from back home.”
Yes, she knows how many new Instagram followers she has. Used to be 12,000. Now it’s almost 18,000. “Earlier this year,” she says, ‘I was growing in the number of followers and then my teammates were pressuring me to go get a blue tick. I said OK, I’ll do it once I hit 10(k). And then I hit 10. Then I said, when I hit 15 I’ll do it. Then I kind of skip it ... and my teammate is just like, give me your phone I’ll do it for you.”
But no, it’s not done yet.
After the golden moment, fame comes like a gentle wave. The followers, the interviews, the wefies, this young life reshaped in 23.03 seconds. She’ll still be herself and yet she’ll be forever changed.
Next to her is sitting the thoughtful Portuguese perfectionist, Luis Cunha. So has he already told you what you didn’t do well?

“Yeah, sort of,” she says. “Like the ending wasn’t really my usual ending. I end stronger usually. I was slowing down a lot, maybe towards the end. But usually I’m quite composed all the way to the end”.
The proper race debrief hasn’t happened yet, but Cunha will watch the race and re-watch it and note every detail. It’s his job to nitpick, to challenge, to make her faster still. After the golden moment, ambition doesn’t die.
The faster she goes, the harder it becomes to slice off shards of a second. Every fraction cut is hard labour. Still, how fast would she like to go, even if it’s just an idea, a fantasy, a longing out there in the distance.


“I mean, it will be a dream for sure, to let’s say, for the 100 meters (to go) sub-11 seconds. That will be a dream. It’s a very big stretch. (Shaving off ) .2 seconds is a lot in the 100m (her best is 11.2). (And shaving off) .57 is a lot in the 200 (her best is 22.57). Yeah, it’d be a dream. A dream come true if I were to go sub-22 seconds ever in my life.”
2023100273858650img0314_1.jpg

Shanti Pereira clocked 23.03 seconds to claim the gold. ST PHOTO: MARK CHEONG
But quickly she adds a cautionary note.
“I know it’s very, very, very hard to reach.”
But fast isn’t just a time, it’s a place, it’s a position in an elite gathering. “It was a dream,” she says, “to be in the World Championship semi-finals. Did that. Now I have to see how the next season will pan out. But hopefully an Olympic semi-final in a better position than from where I was at the world champs this year. I was in 17th position (200) and 31st for the 100. So a better position.”

After the golden moment, an athlete sees another figure in the mirror. An updated, refined version of herself. Because victory wasn’t just over everyone else but herself, the moment, demons, the past. This position she found herself in, favourite to win a race at the Asian Games, this was unusual, new and loaded with pressure and she met it beautifully.
“I feel,” she says, “I handled (the pressure) pretty well. I’ve been in this position before, not this particular specific position, but I’ve been in a position where I’m the favourite, and I’m expected to win. And I remember how I handled it back then. I was just so scared of all the pressure from everywhere and the expectations.”
But this time, she says, “Now I’m saying I’ve never been in this position before and I’m just truly embracing it. And just thanking everybody that has put me in this position.” And you could see this poise in her run and you can hear this assuredness in her voice.
“I’m at the athlete’s village and I got people on the day of the competition coming up to me to say, ‘So first, ah, later’. If it was me, years ago, I would have taken that as a huge pressure point, but I didn’t this time around”. She just grins and says she told them, “You’ll see”.
And we did.
On the podium, as she wept to the music of the national anthem, when life and her breathing had slowed down, when there was nothing left to achieve but only to be hailed, it was only then that it sank in. “Yeah, I just did that, you know?” The next morning when she awoke, she was that simplest of things. “Happy.”
After the golden moment, you see, life has a shine.
Gxgx Gxgx to Shanti.... Banzai Banzai Banzai
 
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