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Story of Naked PRC Whore Drowned in Adrian Chua Boon Chye's Sentosa Pool

makapaaa

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
#1
<TABLE class=msgtable cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="96%"><TBODY><TR><TD class=msg vAlign=top><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR class=msghead><TD class=msgbfr1 width="1%"> </TD><TD><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR class=msghead vAlign=top><TD class=msgF width="1%" noWrap align=right>From: </TD><TD class=msgFname width="68%" noWrap>kojakbt_89 <NOBR></NOBR> </TD><TD class=msgDate width="30%" noWrap align=right>8:22 am </TD></TR><TR class=msghead><TD class=msgT height=20 width="1%" noWrap align=right>To: </TD><TD class=msgTname width="68%" noWrap>ALL <NOBR></NOBR></TD><TD class=msgNum noWrap align=right> </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD class=msgleft rowSpan=4 width="1%"> </TD><TD class=wintiny noWrap align=right>33514.1 </TD></TR><TR><TD height=8></TD></TR><TR><TD class=msgtxt>May 22, 2010

A death in the family

Beyond a lurid tale lies a journey of loss and grief touched by kindness, to lay a wandering spirit to rest

<!-- by line -->By Neo Xiaobin
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IT LOOKED like another lurid tale from the seamier side of Singapore life - the naked body of a beautiful Chinese karaoke lounge hostess found floating in the pool of a posh Sentosa bungalow owned by a wealthy real estate tycoon.
Most of the squalid details were there. It does not take much imagination to fill in the rest, nor much time for the sniggering to start. Village girl from China turned hostess in Singapore to make a quick buck, comes to grief. Morality tales do not come much clearer than that.
But look a bit harder behind the scandal headlines and a different, more complex and distressing tale emerges.
It is one of an impoverished family, bereaved and bewildered by a tragedy they can hardly comprehend, who sell everything they own to make a desperate journey to Singapore to bring home their daughter's body.
It is also a tale of Third World ambition coming up hard against the harsher, unforgiving realities of life in a rich country and a tale - there is some good out of all of this - of what the kindness of strangers can achieve.
The story hangs, of course, on that fateful night at Sentosa on March 23.
Media reports provide the outline.
Mr Adrian Chua Boon Chye, 39, founder and chief executive of Roundhill Capital, a property investment management firm, reportedly met the slim, 1.6m, long-haired beauty Li Hong Yan, 24, at Las Vegas De' Palace, a karaoke lounge in Havelock Road.
They were believed to have left together and gone to a Boat Quay pub before heading to Mr Chua's waterfront house in Sentosa Cove's Ocean Drive, one of which sold for $30 million late last year.
She spent the night and was found by a maid about 8am the next day, floating face down in his 1.3m lap pool. She had no apparent physical injuries, and it is believed she drowned. Police have classified the case as unnatural death and are still investigating.
Ms Li had arrived here four months earlier on Nov 10 aiming to support her parents - impoverished soya bean farmers - in Heilongjiang, a province in north-eastern China bordering Jilin province to the south, Inner Mongolia to the west, and Russia to the north.
'She was the smartest one among the three of us,' elder sister Hong Bo, 26, a housewife, recalls in Mandarin. 'My sister was the most filial and soft-hearted. She loved animals. When we were younger, we used to have an old cow that pulled our carts. My sister would rather walk than sit on the cart as she didn't want to be an extra burden and tire the cow.'
Ms Li landed a day job as a catering supervisor in an Indian eatery along Jalan Besar, until she went back to China on Feb 6 for Chinese New Year. She was also moonlighting as a karaoke hostess in a number of KTV lounges in Havelock Road until her untimely death.
While it made few ripples here, Ms Li's death unleashed something of a whirlwind when her parents received a call in Heilongjiang from her Chinese national friend, Ms Zhao Fan Ru, on the morning of March 25, informing them about it. Her illiterate father Li Kui You, 58, and his wife, Madam Sun Jing Fang, 49, who had never been out of the country, called Ms Li Hong Bo and other relatives to try to make sense of it all and help them get to Singapore.
Mr Li, desperate to raise money to fly here, sold the only valuable asset he owned - about 20,000 sq m of family land - to a fellow villager for 15,000 yuan (S$3,000). He also raised 37,000 yuan in loans from relatives.
The party of five - Ms Li's parents and sister, her sister's mother in-law Madam Fang Shu Hui and her relative, lawyer Bai Bao Hui - set out for Singapore, arriving here on April 7 after a trying five-day journey by car, train and plane.
Ms Li had largely disappeared from the headlines by then, but her family's trauma was just starting.
Coping with grief and fatigue was just part of it. There was the lack of funds and the high cost of Singapore living, the helplessness of being in a foreign land and the stress of dealing with the media.
For 10 days, the family stayed in the same room in Ipoh Lane that Ms Li had rented here, surviving on bread and cup noodles. They hoped for answers that would paint a clearer picture of what happened, but got none. Another blow came when they learnt through Chinese newspaper reports that Ms Li was not working as a hairdresser here as she claimed but was moonlighting as a karaoke hostess.
Amid this despair, a fortunate turn: Singaporean undertaker Roland Tay and wife Sally Ho, of Direct Singapore Funeral Services, read about their plight in the newspapers and volunteered their help. The couple arranged the wake and funeral, picked up the tab, completed the necessary paperwork and helped them deal with the media.
Mr Tay, who has donated his services in past high-profile tragedies and murder victims such as Chinese national Huang Na and Kallang body-parts victim Liu Hong Mei, said: 'They have nothing, and there was no one for them to turn to. I just wanted to help them ease their problems.'
That did not make the funeral arrangements any less traumatic for Ms Li's parents. They broke down and collapsed several times after seeing their daughter's body at the Singapore General Hospital morgue.
On April 10, Mr Tay received permission from Sentosa Cove's management for the family to perform a Taoist ceremony by the bungalow pool where Ms Li is believed to have died. The family brought with them Ms Li's favourite clothes - a white hooded top, blue jeans and a pair of white sneakers. The clothes were laid neatly on the grass by the pool as a monk performed the rites and chanted prayers.
There was no sign of Mr Chua at the ceremony, nor any activity inside the bungalow. Its green, woven curtains were drawn shut. Dead leaves had settled at the bottom of the pool. Also absent was Ms Li's father, who was so physically and emotionally traumatised that he missed the service at Mandai Crematorium on April 11.
Then, another fortunate turn. Newspaper photos of the grieving family prompted more than 20 anonymous well-wishers, mostly Singaporeans, Caucasians and Chinese nationals here, to come forward with condolences and $35,000 in donations.
For that, Madam Fang, bowing deeply, said: 'There are no words to describe our gratitude to the donors and the Tays for everything they have done for us.'
THE final leg of the family's journey began on April 16, an overcast and wet Friday.
At Changi Airport, they handcarried all their luggage, including an A3-sized red suitcase containing a wooden urn holding Ms Li's ashes. At the check-in queue, as if all strength had departed him, Mr Li let out a sigh and sank to the floor on his haunches. He hardly spoke till back in Dalian airport 12 hours later, when he broke down in the arms of relatives.
Greeting them was Ms Li's brother Ai Hui, 21, a lance corporal with the People's Liberation Army, who had not seen his family since he enlisted with the Shenyang Military Region in Liaoning Province two years ago. He was allowed out with special permission on compassionate grounds.
The relatives had no idea what transpired in Singapore, except that Ms Li accidentally fell into a pool and drowned.
'If the rest of the relatives found out exactly what she was working as in Singapore, I'm afraid they may look down on her family,' said Madam Fang.
The group wended their way down Yingke Road from the airport to a lodging house 600m away. When Mr Li's legs gave way, his son piggybacked him the rest of the way, as he struggled to get down. 'My heart is aching so badly,' he moaned.
The younger Mr Li did his best to console his father: 'You still have my eldest sister and me.'
The next day, while curled up in bed resting in a 60-yuan-per-night lodging house, Ms Li's father, who had thus far maintained a stoical silence, covered his face as he wept.
'My wife has no more strength left to cry. I have to put on a tough front as the man of the household in front of everyone else. But it's not tears that I'm crying. It's blood. At least we managed to bring her back to her favourite city. Only when her ashes are laid to rest will I fulfil my duty as her father.'
Ms Li spent 21/2 years in Dalian working as a salon hairdresser, and before that, four years as a flax mill worker in Keshan County. Her dream had been to earn enough to relocate her family to Dalian, where she eventually hoped to settle down.
To fulfil her last wish, the family spent the next two days tearing around Dalian, preparing for her sea burial at the sea-facing Dalian Laohutan Ocean Park.
A divination master picked April 19, 8.06am, as an auspicious time for her ashes to be scattered. According to Dalian custom, because Ms Li was single and died an unnatural death in a foreign land, hers is a wandering spirit that cannot be buried back home. Neither her remains nor her belongings were allowed to be brought home or buried in the family's ancestral plot in Shandong.
'It is believed that if a single wandering spirit is buried in the ancestral plot, there will be a curse on the future generations of the family and a tragic death will occur every generation,' said Ms Li Hong Bo.
THE burial morning was shrouded by fog. By 6.30am, the grim party of 10 made their way to Dalian Laohutan Ocean Park.
Mr Li Ai Hui was in his military uniform to send his second sister off. 'Her wish was for me to be a good soldier. I will not disappoint her,' he vowed.
Next to the jetty, a make-shift altar with incense, fruit and Chinese wine was set up for the family to pay their last respects. Stacks of yellow joss paper were burned and the wind sent ash spiralling into the darkening sky.
As the symphony of sobs began, Mr Li Ai Hui wiped away his parents' tears. When his own fell, he turned his head away so no one would see.
According to custom, female relatives were not allowed to partake in the burial. Just before 8.06am, the men climbed into an 800-yuan rental boat and headed out into the choppy sea. Mr Li unzipped the red suitcase containing his daughter's ashes and unpacked petals of her favourite red roses, bought at an exorbitant 30 yuan the day before.
'8.05.57... 58... 59,' Mr Li Ai Hui counted down the seconds from his watch.
'8.06.'
Mr Li, wearing a pair of red hand- sewn gloves, scooped up the brittle white ash and roses with both hands and cast them out into the murky sea. He let out guttural moans, as his son reminded him not to cry. It is believed that if tears fall into the ashes, the deceased will not rest in peace. As he quickened his motions, his wails intensified with each fling: 'Let father send you off one last time!'
When the ashes were all gone, he hurled the wooden urn and suitcase overboard, along with his gloves. As the boatmen started the engine and headed back, the suitcase and urn bobbed in the water, encircled by the petals. No one was allowed to look back.
The final goodbye had been said.
THERE was one more task to complete with the cash raised in Singapore.
The family had spent S$2,000 on air tickets. The rest was converted into 161,700 yuan - the equivalent of S$33,000.
They took 17 hours of trains and four more hours of driving to return to Li Ming Village in Keshan County, where their thatched-roof mud hut waited, and a brown mongrel barked testily as it tugged against its chain. Madam Fang hastily searched the cupboards for a handwritten contract that had been drawn up three weeks earlier.
The villager who bought their land for 15,000 yuan agreed at the time to sell the plot back for three times what he had paid. But after hearing their sorry tale, he sold it back to them for twice the amount.
In all, the family spent about 80,000 yuan on the Singapore trip. They used 37,000 yuan to repay loans borrowed from friends and relatives. The remaining money from the donations - about 15,000 yuan - was saved up for any return trip to Singapore for the coroner's inquiry and to cover the parents' future expenses. Mr Li, who makes at most 10,000 yuan on a good year from tilling his land, said: 'We are deeply grateful to the anonymous donors. Because of their money, at least we have a form of financial security for the next two to three years.'
Buying back his land brought an ending of sorts. But it was impossible to sit in the family's 350 sq ft newspaper-plastered home, where Ms Li used to sleep on a 'kang' (a heatable brick bed commonly used in the north where it is cold) together with her parents and siblings, and not think of her fateful journey. Mired in poverty but fuelled by ambition, she decided, like many others, to try her luck in Singapore, only to die naked in a private pool amid a public scandal.
After his traumatic journey to Singapore and over a month to heal, her father paces around in bewilderment, unable to sleep for more than three hours at a stretch.
'Whenever I close my eyes, I see her... Hong Yan convinced me to let her go to Singapore. She said the country was very safe. Good legal system, nice people, great environment. I did not know the extent she suffered. If I knew what she was going through, I would not have let her go,' he said.
'She worked so hard to earn money for all of us, but she forgot to take care of herself.'

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makapaaa

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
#2
So a net gain of RMB 80k from the gold digging trip. Can go back to buy back the plot of land they sold to their neighbours and many more plots to come!
 

makapaaa

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
#3
<TABLE class=msgtablealt cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="96%"><TBODY><TR><TD class=msg vAlign=top><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR class=msghead><TD class=msgbfr1 width="1%"> </TD><TD><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR class=msghead vAlign=top><TD class=msgF width="1%" noWrap align=right>From: </TD><TD class=msgFname width="68%" noWrap>kojakbt_89 <NOBR></NOBR> </TD><TD class=msgDate width="30%" noWrap align=right>8:22 am </TD></TR><TR class=msghead><TD class=msgT height=20 width="1%" noWrap align=right>To: </TD><TD class=msgTname width="68%" noWrap>kojakbt_89 <NOBR></NOBR></TD><TD class=msgNum noWrap align=right> (2 of 28) </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD class=msgleft rowSpan=4 width="1%"> </TD><TD class=wintiny noWrap align=right>33514.2 in reply to 33514.1 </TD></TR><TR><TD height=8></TD></TR><TR><TD class=msgtxt>Neo Xiaobin, 26, is a photojournalist with The Straits Times. She was seized by the ill-fated story of Chinese karaoke lounge hostess Li Hong Yan, 24, who was found floating naked in the lap pool of a Sentosa Cove bungalow on March 24, and how Ms Li's parents sold their farm in Heilongjiang to raise money to come here to collect her ashes.
On April 10, she attended the wake and persuaded the family to allow her to follow them home. They agreed, because of their gratitude to Singapore donors who had given them more than $35,000.
From April 16 to 25, she followed the family to Dalian city in Liaoning where they scattered Ms Li's ashes into the sea, then to the soya bean farm in Li Ming village in Heilongjiang where Ms Li grew up.
She spent 10 days travelling, braving diarrhoea and freezing temperatures to file this report.
She says her time spent with the family in China's north-east was a precious experience she will never forget. 'I remain most grateful to the family for allowing me to intrude on their moments of grief...
'Despite Singapore being the country where they lost their daughter under mysterious circumstances, the family had nothing but nice things to say about it to their relatives, describing it as a 'beautiful, clean city filled with kind people with good hearts'.
'They repeatedly instructed me to convey their deepest gratitude and appreciation for the kindness they had experienced in Singapore.'
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=> The 154th would seize on every moment itself to import FTrash!
 

makapaaa

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
#4
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TRAGIC DEATH: The body of 24-year-old Chinese karaoke lounge hostess Li Hong Yan (above left) was found floating in the lap pool of a Sentosa Cove bungalow on March 24. Her death marks the start of her family's long, painful journey to Singapore. Overcome by grief, Ms Li's parents were unable to carry out the task of bringing their daughter home. It was her sister, Hong Bo, who held everyone together. Her father did not go to the Mandai Crematorium - he had cut his chin and dislocated his left shoulder when he collapsed earlier at the morgue - while her mother could not sit through the 30-minute prayer service. -- PHOTO: LIANHE WANBAO FILE PHOTO

Was any autopsy done? Was there any alcohol or drug in her body then? Or everything has been swept under the carpet cos an Elite was involved?

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makapaaa

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
#5
<TABLE class=msgtablealt cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="96%"><TBODY><TR><TD class=msg vAlign=top><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR class=msghead><TD class=msgbfr1 width="1%"> </TD><TD><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR class=msghead vAlign=top><TD class=msgF width="1%" noWrap align=right>From: </TD><TD class=msgFname width="68%" noWrap>kojakbt_89 <NOBR></NOBR> </TD><TD class=msgDate width="30%" noWrap align=right>8:23 am </TD></TR><TR class=msghead><TD class=msgT height=20 width="1%" noWrap align=right>To: </TD><TD class=msgTname width="68%" noWrap>kojakbt_89 <NOBR></NOBR></TD><TD class=msgNum noWrap align=right> (4 of 29) </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD class=msgleft rowSpan=4 width="1%"> </TD><TD class=wintiny noWrap align=right>33514.4 in reply to 33514.3 </TD></TR><TR><TD height=8></TD></TR><TR><TD class=msgtxt>

MEMORIES: The album cover (above) of Ms Li's studio photos shows the long-haired beauty in swimwear - one of her sexier pictures. Brother Ai Hui flips through the album that she left behind in Dalian before she came to Singapore. It is relatively cheap to get studio shots in Dalian, so creating personal albums is popular. Her brother says she liked to look good.



TEARFUL REUNION: Emotions spilling over as the Li family arrive at Dalian airport - the Singapore part of their ordeal is over but the sea burial yet to come. Ms Li's father, Mr Li Kui You (second from left), is supported by relatives Zhang Yan Hui (left) and Yang Ming Hui, while Ms Li's brother Ai Hui (right) and aunt Sun Jing Hua (third from right) help her mother Sun Jing Fang. -- ST PHOTOS: NEO XIAOBIN
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=> 154th bitch: Say cheese...oops, I mean 'Cry Father Cry Mother'!
 

makapaaa

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
#6
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PILLAR OF STRENGTH: Mr Li Ai Hui, a lance corporal in the People's Liberation Army, carrying his father on his back after Mr Li Kui You's legs gave way from grief and exhaustion. The younger Mr Li was not told about his sister's death. He found out about it only after he searched the Internet for news about his sister, sensing that something was amiss. He later confronted his aunt. On the night he was told the truth, he drank a bottle of Chinese wine for the first time since he entered the military.



TIME OUT: The day before Ms Li Hong Yan's sea burial, Mr Li Ai Hui tries to get his mother to pose with him for a photo during a family outing at Tigers Sculpture Square in Dalian Laohutan Ocean Park. She wants none of it and struggles to get away.
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=> Looks like that that kind of 'huat ah!' joy...
 

kingrant

Alfrescian
Loyal
#7
A much ado about nothing! What a squandering of precious newspaper columns which cld have been devoted to the poor, the needy, the old, the destitiute, the homeless! The spastics in the brothel shld all be sacked.
 

makapaaa

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
#8
<TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD class=msgleft rowSpan=4 width="1%"></TD><TD class=wintiny noWrap align=right>33514.8 in reply to 33514.7 </TD></TR><TR><TD height=8></TD></TR><TR><TD class=msgtxt>

A SOLDIER'S TEARS: Mr Li Ai Hui struggling to hold back his tears on the day his sister, Hong Yan, was laid to rest. He had put on a brave front for his parents' sake until that day. 'A man does not cry,' he said. He had not seen his family since he enlisted with the Shenyang Military Region in Liaoning province two years ago. 'Her wish was for me to be a good soldier, he says. 'I will not disappoint her.' -- ST PHOTOS: NEO XIAOBIN



LETTING GO: At precisely 8.06am on April 19, Mr Li Kui You scatters his daughter's ashes and red rose petals in the murky sea off Dalian. In great distress, he then throws over the wooden urn. With him are (from left) relatives Yang Ming Hui and Zhang Yan Hui, the boat operator, and his son Ai Hui. The yellow eight-seater speedboat is usually reserved for park visitors to tour scenic locations around Laohutan. It costs the family 800 yuan (S$160) to rent. After the burial, Chinese crackers were set off at the jetty for good luck.
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makapaaa

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
#9

HOMEWARD BOUND: After the sea burial, Ms Li's sister Hong Bo, her husband Zhang Qi He and her mother-in-law Fang Shu Hui chat at Dalian railway station before their 17-hour train journey to Qiqihar. After that is a three-hour drive to Keshan county, and then another hour's drive to Li Ming village where they hope to buy back the family land that Mr Li sold to pay for the Singapore trip.




SETTLING UP: The three of them check the bank book after withdrawing 60,000 yuan in cash from the Keshan branch of the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China. Half of the amount will be used to buy back the farm land, the final step before Ms Li's parents can start to rebuild their lives.


=> There you go...Their lives will probably be better than the 80% Phole squatters in Peesai from now on!
 

makapaaa

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
#10
<TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR class=msghead><TD class=msgbfr1 width="1%"></TD><TD><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR class=msghead vAlign=top><TD class=msgF width="1%" noWrap align=right>From: </TD><TD class=msgFname width="68%" noWrap>kojakbt_89 <NOBR></NOBR> </TD><TD class=msgDate width="30%" noWrap align=right>8:27 am </TD></TR><TR class=msghead><TD class=msgT height=20 width="1%" noWrap align=right>To: </TD><TD class=msgTname width="68%" noWrap>kojakbt_89 <NOBR></NOBR></TD><TD class=msgNum noWrap align=right> (10 of 35) </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD class=msgleft rowSpan=4 width="1%"> </TD><TD class=wintiny noWrap align=right>33514.10 in reply to 33514.9 </TD></TR><TR><TD height=8></TD></TR><TR><TD class=msgtxt>

FAMILY REFLECTIONS: Mementos and photographs stuffed into the frame of a mirror at the Li family home in Li Ming village. The mirror catches the eye when you walk into the single-room thatched hut. The snaps show Ms Li Hong Yan with her hand covering her mouth, sister Hong Bo with her son at an amusement park, and brother Ai Hui in his military attire.



MUD HOUSE: Ms Li Hong Bo stands outside her parents' 33 sq m home where she and her siblings grew up. When it rains, the thatched roof leaks. Although she now lives in the city with her in-laws at Keshan county, an hour's drive away from Li Ming village, she stays over one week a month to be with her parents. They had remained in Dalian for�health checks after the sea burial. The family land which they had sold is 10 to 15 minutes' walk from the home. It is about 20,000 sq m - or three soccer fields - in size. 'Getting the land back is important as they would be busy working and not have time to think and be sad about my sister,' she says.

=> Stupid 154th Leeporter really believed that their home is only 33 sqm when their land is 3 soccer field big?
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makapaaa

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
#11
<TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD class=wintiny noWrap align=right>33514.11 in reply to 33514.10 </TD></TR><TR><TD height=8></TD></TR><TR><TD class=msgtxt>

TAKING NOTE: The handwritten agreement states that 'Li Kui You needs cash urgently and is willing to sell his family land to Yao Yan Ming for 15,000 yuan. If any party violates the terms of contract, he has to bear the compensation amounting to two times the original sum that the land is sold for.' Both parties' copies of the contract were destroyed after the successful negotiation.

=> No date? Interesting...



DEAL LANDED: In-law Fang Shu Hui thanks Mr Yao Yan Ming for selling back the Li family land. They had sat at the table while she explained why the land had to be sold. Mr Yao, who had already bought fertiliser and seeds, went home to discuss the matter with his wife; he returned. 'They have met with such misfortune. They also need the land for their livelihood. I'll just go out to look for a job immediately.'

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makapaaa

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
#12
<TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR class=msghead><TD><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR class=msghead vAlign=top><TD class=msgF width="1%" noWrap align=right>From: </TD><TD class=msgFname width="68%" noWrap>kojakbt_89 <NOBR></NOBR> </TD><TD class=msgDate width="30%" noWrap align=right>8:29 am </TD></TR><TR class=msghead><TD class=msgT height=20 width="1%" noWrap align=right>To: </TD><TD class=msgTname width="68%" noWrap>kojakbt_89 <NOBR></NOBR></TD><TD class=msgNum noWrap align=right> (12 of 38) </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD class=msgleft rowSpan=4 width="1%"> </TD><TD class=wintiny noWrap align=right>33514.12 in reply to 33514.11 </TD></TR><TR><TD height=8></TD></TR><TR><TD class=msgtxt>

FRESH FIELDS: Ms Li Hong Bo holds a soya bean plant as she walks on the Li family land. Her uncle Wang Zeng Lu (far left) is speaking with her husband and her mother-in-law. 'We are deeply grateful to the donors,' says Ms Li's father, Mr Li Kui You. [COLOR=_______]'We now have financial security for the next two to three years. $35,000 is a large sum.[/COLOR] Farming, with good weather and harvest, gives us only 10,000 yuan a year.' $35,000 is about 174,000 yuan.

=> Are the Familee TRAITORS and FAPee dogs reading and asking themselves why FTrash can accept $800 PM pay? And why FTrash die die will never give up their passport?

UNSETTLED JOURNEY: Ms Li Hong Bo in a mini-van taking her from Li Ming village to the city of Keshan county where she lives. The Chinese characters on the upholstery mean 'bon voyage'. Although the family have sent Ms Li Hong Yan on her final journey, the fact remains that they still do not know how she died. Ms Li Hong Bo does not intend for her parents to return to Singapore for the coroner's inquiry. -- ST PHOTOS: NEO XIAOBIN

=> So will the 'transparent' legal system in Peesai seek the truth or hide it cos...
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longbow

Alfrescian
Loyal
#13
Question is who is the tycoon that owns this house.

With a bevy of good legal advice, he might be able to work his way out of it.

Obviously, he took her home but what was she doing swimming naked? Anyway sound suspicious.

Again who is this guy and how well connected is he?
 

longbow

Alfrescian
Loyal
#14
In a way really sad. Family had trouble raising S$3K. Heck that used to be 1 large 3 liter bottle of Cordon Bleu which would maybe last 2 KTV sessions.

So the money was just too good.
 

Jabba

Alfrescian
Loyal
#15
what happened to adrian chua boon chye? he just disappeared from the limelight?did he make any compensations? was he being investigated?
 

Rogue Trader

Alfrescian (Inf)
Asset
#19
what happened to adrian chua boon chye? he just disappeared from the limelight?did he make any compensations? was he being investigated?
That's the key question.
Where is Adrian Chua now?
You all just missed the whole point of this sunday times feature. Miss Li has gone home. After her burial, the family has closed the chapter and is moving on with their own lives.

So when the court rules Miss Li's drowning a misadventure, don't say our elite is heartless because cheongster Adrian Chua was in fact helping to support her improverished family by patronising her services.
 
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