1. IP addresses are NOT logged in this forum so there's no point asking. Members are encouraged to install GOM or HOLA or TUNNELBEAR for an added layer of protection.

    The SEX forum is HERE so please stop asking.

Serious Boeing completes deliveries of F-15SG jets to Singapore

Discussion in 'The Courtyard Café' started by Papsmearer, Jul 13, 2017.

  1. Papsmearer

    Papsmearer Alfrescian (InfP) - Comp Old Timer

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    Messages:
    18,665
    Likes Received:
    177
    Trophy Points:
    63
    MELBOURNE, Australia — Boeing has completed the delivery of eight more F-15SG Eagle multirole fighter jets to Singapore, according to data from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration.


    The FAA’s website showed that the last of eight F-15SGs on its civil register had its registration canceled in the middle of June, with export being listed the reason for cancellation and its destination listed as Singapore.


    This last aircraft, with the FAA registration N361SG/05-8361, was classified as an experimental aircraft in its registration details under the categories of research and development as well as crew training. It is the only one of the eight to be classified as such, and had been noted to be flying over Boeing’s facilities in St Louis, Missouri, as far back as September 2016.

    The reason for this classification is unknown; however, the FAA defines its research and development classification as “to conduct aircraft operations as a matter of research or to determine if an idea warrants further development. Typical uses for this certificate include new equipment installations, operating techniques, or new uses for aircraft,” while crew training is for aircraft that are used “for training the applicant’s flight crews in experimental aircraft for subsequent operation of aircraft being flight tested in type certificate programs or for production flight testing”.



    These eight F-15SGs on the FAA’s database were first registered in mid-2014 by Boeing. Deliveries of these aircraft began in early 2016, with the first aircraft seen in April at the Republic of Singapore Air Force's training detachment at Mountain Home Air Force Base in Idaho.


    It's unknown why Boeing registered the military F-15SGs on the FAA’s civil aircraft database, with a source having suggested to Defense News that it may be due to the aircraft being acquired by Singapore under a Direct Commercial Sales contract with Boeing, although previous batches of Singapore’s F-15SGs and military aircraft for other countries acquired under similar contracts were not placed on the FAA register.


    When asked, Boeing referred Defense News to Singapore’s Defence Ministry, which in turn declined to confirm if Singapore has taken delivery of the jets, citing operational security.

    Singapore, which is very secretive regarding its military, has also not disclosed the number of F-15SGs it has acquired, although a count of the airframes seen so far would indicate that it has 40 aircraft if these latest eight are included.

    The F-15SG is one of the most advanced F-15 models currently in service, being equipped with the Raytheon AN/APG-63(v)3 active electronically scanned array radar and Lockheed Martin’s Sniper targeting pod.

    Singapore also flies 60 Lockheed Martin F-16C/D Block 52 fighters that are currently being upgraded with AESA radars and new mission computers, and is a partner in the Lockheed Martin F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Program, although it has not committed to any orders.
     
  2. JohnTan

    JohnTan Alfrescian (InfP) Old Timer

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2014
    Messages:
    13,121
    Likes Received:
    59
    Trophy Points:
    48
    We should fight a 6 day War kind of war with our neighbours or chinkland to test the operational readiness of our airforce and military. Victory would also ensure that we emerge as the paramount military force in the region for decades to come.
     
  3. tanwahtiu

    tanwahtiu Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Messages:
    10,276
    Likes Received:
    83
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Nah with a lau ah quah CIC everything fail and may get a tifht slap from him.
     
  4. johnny333

    johnny333 Alfrescian (Inf)

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    22,496
    Likes Received:
    162
    Trophy Points:
    63
    On paper the SAF spends more on defence than any of our neighbours. That is why Sporeans have to waste time playing soldier until their 40's. Just imagine what could be done with all those billions that Spore wastes on paper generals & hardware.

    Spore's population numbers is is falling, many are emigrating & the population is aging. So why would they need to conquer territory?
    Spore can attack anyone in this region & win a short term conflict but who is going to hold & occupy the conquered territory?
     
  5. SalahParking

    SalahParking Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2011
    Messages:
    228
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real First world countries have always conquered lands far away. Those subjucates slaves will farm and till the land, mine and dig, breed and milk. The colonists will go there and be landowners, merchants, towkays, but these same colonist were actually losers, non elites in their own home country. I see that we spent so much on military, better put it in good use, rather than wayang NDP, NS bang bang bang....universal ammo round wor! wahahhaa...what a joke!
     
  6. frenchbriefs

    frenchbriefs Alfrescian (Inf)

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2013
    Messages:
    15,419
    Likes Received:
    79
    Trophy Points:
    48
    remember the israeli judens almost lost the 1973 yom kippur war if the americans did not resupply them and replace the hundreds of tanks they lost.....no matter how many planes or tanks u stockpile,its never enough against much larger enemies unless u have the capacity to manufacture ammo and weaps.
     
  7. war is best form of peace

    war is best form of peace Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,696
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    This expensive and useless junk is going straight to Karunguni scrap because it is DISINTEGRATING in flight!

    http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/the-air-force-considers-retiring-the-f-15c-d-for-the-f-1793560213

    The Air Force Considers Retiring The F-15C/D For The F-16
    Terrell Jermaine Starr
    3/23/17 12:39pmFiled to: F-15C/D
    130
    5
    A U.S. Air Force F-15C Photo credit Wikimedia Commons

    The United States Air Force is mulling the retirement of the long-running F-15C and F-15D air-to-air fighter and replacing them with upgraded F-16s by the mid-2020s. It’s a process that will no doubt be as controversial as it is complex.

    The Air Force Times reports that service officials told lawmakers Wednesday at a House Armed Services readiness subcommittee hearing that retiring an entire class of aircraft would save costs and allow pilots to train on fewer platforms.

    The service is in “deep discussions” on the matter and the F-15 inventory will be assessed further next year, said Air National Guard Director Lt. Gen. L. Scott Rice. And Maj. Gen. Scott D. West, director of current operations and deputy chief of staff for operations for the service at the Pentagon, added: “The F-15C [has] served our nation well, as have its pilots for decades. And it was our air superiority fighter; now F-22 has taken that role,” according to military.com.

    The F-15E Strike Eagle wasn’t mentioned.

    An outgrowth of lessons learned during the Vietnam War, the F-15 entered service in the 1970s and has been an staple across the globe ever since for the U.S. Air Force, as well as allies like Japan and Israel. The F-15C is the single-seat variant while the F-15D has two seats. It’s nothing less than iconic at this point, and probably what most people picture when they think of a modern fighter jet. It remains a formidable foe today despite its age. The U.S. still employs nearly 200 F-15Cs and F-15Ds across the globe.

    One idea, Rice said, is to replace the F-15C with F-16s upgraded with AESA (Active Electronically Scanned Array) radars. The system improves an aircraft to scan for air-to-air and air-to-ground threats at the same time.

    However, shelving either plane is not a done deal, according to Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek.

    “We’re always looking at force structure options for the future,” Stefanek said, according to Air Force Times. “Until it is something that we put in our budget as a proposal, it’s just another option that could be pursued. Just because it’s an option doesn’t mean we’ll pursue it.”

    However, that the service is even considering retiring the F-15 C and D is a big deal, even if, as West and Rice said, the proposal is “predecisional.”

    Here is more context on the proposal, per Air Force Times:

    The Air Force is now planning for fiscal 2019, Rice said, but a decision on retiring the F-15C and D would probably not be made this year. Which means those planes would not retire until fiscal 2020 at the earliest.

    But replacing the F-15 C and D—a fighter primarily focused on air-to-air operations—with the F-16, which also has air-to-surface capabilities, would raise questions. The F-15 C and D, which entered the Air Force’s inventory in 1979, carries up to eight AIM-9 Sidewinder and AIM-120 AMRAAM air-to-air missiles. The F-16, on the other hand, can carry up to six air-to-air missiles or air-to-surface munitions. Both planes carry the M-61A1 20mm multi-barrel cannon, but the F-15 can carry 940 rounds of ammunition to the F-16's 500.

    Indeed, the F-16 and the F-15 are two very different planes, a point Rep. Martha McSally (R-Ariz.) made clear during the hearing. The F-16

    A retired Air Force A-10 squadron commander, McSally expressed surprise at the news of the proposal before asking if the F-16 could mirror the capabilities of the F-15C, according to Stars and Stripes:

    “I don’t want to get into pilot rivalries here, but if we’re talking about fourth generation assets, you’ve got the F-15C, which prior to the F-22 was the best at air-to-air … the F-16 is an incredible, versatile, multi-role, little bit less expensive sort of decathlete,” McSally said.

    “Comparing the capabilities side by side …We all need to be careful through that analysis,” McSally said. “[An F-16] doesn’t bring the same capability the F-15 does with expertise in air-to-air.”

    You can watch the exchange around the 1:06:36 mark below:

    Rice, in response, said that the integrating all of the Air Force’s aircraft systems will make the capabilities of each aircraft less important.

    Again, there is no official proposal to retire the F-15 C or D. Folks in the Air Force are talking about it—though it appears lawmakers wish they weren’t.
     
  8. war is best form of peace

    war is best form of peace Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,696
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    http://www.foxnews.com/story/2008/0...etails-f-15-disintegration-at-18000-feet.html

    Air Force Report Details F-15 Disintegration at 18,000 Feet
    Published January 10, 2008 Associated Press
    Facebook Twitter Email Print

    WASHINGTON – An Air Force investigation of the crash last fall of an F-15C Eagle fighter jet concluded that a defective metal beam in the frame cracked, causing it to disintegrate during flight.

    In a report being released Thursday, obtained in advance by The Associated Press, Air Force investigators said they had found that the sole reason for the accident was the faulty support beam, called a longeron, which failed to meet the manufacturer's specifications.

    The investigation was led by Air Force Col. William Wignall.

    "The accident investigation board president (Wignall) found, by clear and convincing evidence, the cause of this accident was a failure of the upper right longeron, a critical support structure in the F-15C aircraft," the report says.

    About 20 minutes after takeoff from an airfield near St. Louis on Nov. 2, the forward fuselage of Maj. Stephen Stilwell's $42 million F-15C Eagle shook violently and then broke apart 18,000 feet above the ground. Stilwell, his left shoulder dislocated and his left arm shattered, barely had time to safely eject as pieces of his aircraft tumbled from the sky over the Missouri countryside.

    More troubling, however, are the results of a parallel examination finding as many as 163 of the workhorse aircraft also have flawed support beams, or longerons. The aircraft remain grounded as the Air Force continues to determine how serious the problem is and whether extensive, costly repairs are needed. Another 19 of the aircraft have yet to be inspected and also remain grounded.

    Nearly 260 of the A through D model F-15s, first fielded in the mid-1970s, were returned to flight status Tuesday following fleet-wide inspections.

    The twin-engine aircraft are used primarily for homeland security and are a key link in the nation's air defense network.

    The Air Force's fleet of 224 newer F-15E Strike Eagles, which are used in Iraq and Afghanistan, do not have the structural problem. Those jets, whose role is more oriented toward ground attack missions, were temporarily grounded after Stilwell's crash, but returned to service shortly thereafter.

    The older F-15s are stationed at many so-called "alert" sites around the country, where planes and pilots stand ready to take off at a moment's notice to intercept hijacked airliners and guard protected airspace.

    The longeron helps support the cockpit and strengthen the jet as it moves through high-stress maneuvers while traveling hundreds of miles per hour.

    Analysis of recovered parts from Stilwell's jet identified a crack in the beam near the fuselage that investigators say grew over time and was not detected during regular maintenance of the aircraft.

    In the report, Wignall said that prior to Stilwell's flight "no inspection requirements existed for detecting a crack in the longeron."

    The F-15A through D models were built by McDonnell Douglas. That company merged with defense manufacturing giant Boeing in August 1997.

    Company spokeswoman Patricia Frost said Boeing representatives have not seen Wignall's final report and could not comment on it.

    "However, we are working with the U.S. Air Force to analyze the data gathered from fleet-wide inspections," Frost said "Once all of the data have been analyzed, a need for further inspection or repair can be determined."

    The F-22 Raptor, a stealth aircraft intended to replace the F-15, is being fielded but in smaller numbers than initially planned. The Pentagon has said it will buy just 183 Raptors due to their high cost, but members of Congress are pressing Defense Secretary Robert Gates to buy more. A single Raptor costs about $160 million, according to the Air Force.

    The Air Force has said it needs 381 F-22s.

    Loren Thompson, a defense analyst with the Lexington Institute in Arlington, Va., said it may make more sense to retire the older F-15s rather than fix them. Due to their age, another part could fail even after the longerons are repaired.

    "This is an aircraft that was designed during the Nixon administration," Thompson said. "It doesn't seem sensible to be making fixes so late in the game."

    Among the Air Force's other workhorse fighter jets is the F-16, which performs multiple roles, including air-to-air combat and air-to-ground attack. It entered the operational fleet in 1979.


    http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/photo/2008-01/14/content_6392527.htm

    Disintegration of US F-15 fighter jet
    (Xinhua)
    Updated: 2008-01-14 13:55


    This photo released by US Air Force shows a Missouri National Guard F-15 jet broke apart in midair on Nov. 2, 2007 with pilot evacuated. Its announcement says it was because parts that didn't meet specifications raises issues ranging from national security to potential legal action and even foreign sales. [Xinhua]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. johnny333

    johnny333 Alfrescian (Inf)

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    22,496
    Likes Received:
    162
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Have to wonder what war MINDEF is planning for? They are buying fighter jets & other high tech weapon systems without any concern of the true social costs to the "lesser mortals". It might look impressive when displayed during National but why waste so much $$$$:confused:

    Compared to Malaysia which suspended a decision to replace their aging fighters & instead decided to get new surveillance aircraft which are required for monitoring their borders from threats like ISIS.
     
  10. Papsmearer

    Papsmearer Alfrescian (InfP) - Comp Old Timer

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    Messages:
    18,665
    Likes Received:
    177
    Trophy Points:
    63
    They are not planning to fight any war. They know they cannot win. The leeders will run road anyway. The real reason for the very high defence budget is to allow them to park more and more scholar generals and colonels etc in the SAF and RSAF. Imagine if you have a small defence budget suited to the real needs of Singapore, there is only so many scholarships that the SAF can give out. But they are giving them out like water so that they can co-op more and more scholars into the SAF. These scholars as you know are basically the grooming ground for the PAP. The PAP is using taxpayer money to develop and bribe their next generation MPs and Ministers with SAF scholarships. How many oppo politicians have a SAF scholarship? I would venture to guess non.

    If your country this small needs only one squadron of F-15, then you only need one full bird Colonel Squadron commander, and the most, one RSAF general. But if you have 10 fighter squadrons of F-15s, F-16s and F-5, you can now have 10 SAF scholars running 10 squadrons and maybe 3 generals. Same for the Army. I can tell you we need no more the one battalion of Leo 2 and maybe 150 Bionix. But we have at least 96, and some reports say 182 Leo 2s. And also several hundreds of Bionix. The more equipment you have and more battalions and more units u have, the more scholar generals you can justify in your budget and more ammo for PAP to make future politicians. Simple as that. All this money spend on defence is not for the protection of Singapore but for keeping the PAP in power.
     
  11. sleaguepunter

    sleaguepunter Alfrescian (Inf)

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    Messages:
    6,107
    Likes Received:
    175
    Trophy Points:
    63
    there still hundreds of M113s of various variants still sitting under storage. There are rows upon rows of vehicles under canvas lying inside reservist camps. although i MRed in late 2000s, i will still be recall under armour in event of conflict, not PDF, and will be using vehicles that already phrased out in current saf standard equipment. i would have draw equipment and vehicle from a camp that is not gedong when a certain green man flash on tv. (but i already forgotten the callsign:p) i bet there will still be a couple hundred of SM1s available as these tank crews didnt attend LeoII conversion. With so much old equipments, in theory saf can raise another 10-15 battalions just of armour infantry. all these paper units need paper generals to be commanding officers. there are still infantry, guards, arty, engineer, signal etc etc....
     
  12. Papsmearer

    Papsmearer Alfrescian (InfP) - Comp Old Timer

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    Messages:
    18,665
    Likes Received:
    177
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Not under canvas lah. Its called Dri-Clad. All fluids are drained from the vehicles and then the vehicle is wrapped in some kind of heavy shrink wrapped plastic. Very effective to protect from pest and insects infestation and the elements of the weather. PDF has no tracked armour component. U would have been recalled to a reservist armour unit if activated for war. As for the SM1 tankees, no reservist training has been conducted in these tanks for pretty much 10 years now. I am sure some of these SM1s are still in dri clad somewhere. But to activate tankees who have not been inside one for 10 years and ask them to go to war in them is crazy. U still need a several week refresher course. And many of these crewmen are not physically able to operate it anymore due to age and what not. Just about the only thing you can do with a couple of hundred SM1s is to dig them into East Coast beaches and around the 2 border checkpoints and use them as stationary pill boxes.
     
  13. greedy and cunning

    greedy and cunning Alfrescian Old Timer

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,318
    Likes Received:
    29
    Trophy Points:
    48
    what ? just war with neigbours or chinkland when we hav such super fighter jets ?

    emperor Lee shuld demand russia , europe england and USAss pay yearly tributes
    to sillypoore or face total annihilation.
     

Share This Page