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Thread: Australia, the lucky country.

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ash007 View Post
    Mate the farmers always complains about something. Too much water, not enough water, too much sun, not enough sun. Don't be surprise that they would start complaining there is a flood next. Wait... that did happen in Queensland.
    Sound like stinkees.
    紀雲.

    晨云之美目不見
    夜深人靜心念云

    年少時多心不定
    老時心悔不惜云

    一生能見几晨雲
    無望心死此决歌


    思云

    辰云之美心头思
    此生无缘再见云

    但愿日落有云伴
    末路走来无遗憾

    虽然辰云随风散
    但云永在心头思

    忘云
    从起点到终点
    云得到的是伤痕
    隆得到的是遗憾
    伤痕随时间愈合
    遗憾将伴隆一生

    人生
    人生已经走到尽头,还有什么梦
    人生像一盘棋走着走着,怎么会走到死棋
    明知死棋,还继续下
    这是天意,还是认命
    这是放下,还是无望
    就算会有奇迹,还有时间吗?
    是我消沉,还是事实
    男人不怕入错行,是怕睡错人

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    Australians at least know how to battle against foreigners.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    http://therealsingapore.com/content/...age-70-blasted

    sounds like sinkies have invaded aussie politicks! MORE GOOD YEARS for aussie!!! kekekekkekekke.
    List of my boycott establishments:-
    ALL SINKIE BUSINESSES. ALL OF THEM TRAITORS. No diggity, no doubt.

  4. #24
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    Quote Originally Posted by neddy View Post
    still people here with the passion to grow quality food, and cook them to perfection.

    Bro neddy,

    They have a relatively new branch at Pagewood Eastgarden NSW. Had churros with caramel dip there. Buy 1 get 1 free - courtesy of the Entertainment Book.

    Really yummy.

    BTW, if you shop at Woolies and top up your petrol at Caltex, it is good value to pay for an Entertainment Book. http://www.entertainmentbook.com.au/ Buying the Entertainment Book will allow you to buy Gift cards at 5% discount off the face value of the card. These Gift Cards can be used at Woolies, Caltex, Dick Smith, Dan Murphy etc. There are lots of makan offers too. p/s for the Sydney version, they have taken off Coles from the book. I recovered the cost of my book many times over for the past few years.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    How many of you keep staring at her chest ? How long it takes you to look away from the lady's chest? Mai ke ke... Admit it !!

    Quote Originally Posted by neddy View Post
    still people here with the passion to grow quality food, and cook them to perfection.



    Successful Singapore migrant offering free churros with every order after 10pm this month only.

    Second branch opened in East Vic Park, very popular


  6. #26
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    Not the biggest I've seen over here to be honest.

    Quote Originally Posted by axe168 View Post
    How many of you keep staring at her chest ? How long it takes you to look away from the lady's chest? Mai ke ke... Admit it !!

  7. #27
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    No.

    NZ is the lucky country.

    All the natural attractions of Australia, and not a single venomous critter. They all got dumped on ozland.

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ash007 View Post
    Not the biggest I've seen over here to be honest.
    Why would any guys want something greater than a B ? The risk of suffocation gets higher, the sagging get lower over time but the pleasure does not increase.

  9. #29
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ash007 View Post
    Not the biggest I've seen over here to be honest.
    Why would any guys want something greater than a B ? The risk of suffocation gets higher with the letters, the sagging get lower over time but the pleasure does not increase.




    Seriously, I am thinking of calling it a day in this forum. Whatever is happening in Singapore is no longer my business, Australia is going to be my part time home and I will be relocating to somewhere.

    I have made plans for this day of reckoning for just over 2 years now. I have one year to watch if Perth return to the slumbering days of the 1990s. Overall, I have had a great time, with the Howard years, Greenspan bubbles and China boom. All good times come to an end. My retirement date is set.

  10. #30
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    Quote Originally Posted by axe18 View Post
    How many of you kein a beautyp staring at her chest ? How long it takes you to look away from the lady's chest? Mai ke ke... Admit it !!
    This photo from the first outlet in Northbridge (she owns 2. Taken in hot summer, more things to see. Starring only happen at the beginning of the hot season. After that, it becomes an eyesore.
    In my workplace, the SWTs are competing in a daily beauty contest, get very slutty on Fridays. That is when older cows and even older whales pitch in with the show of freckles and cellulose

  11. #31
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    Ok dude..all the best n will miss yr input on all oz shit...

    Quote Originally Posted by neddy View Post
    Why would any guys want something greater than a B ? The risk of suffocation gets higher with the letters, the sagging get lower over time but the pleasure does not increase.




    Seriously, I am thinking of calling it a day in this forum. Whatever is happening in Singapore is no longer my business, Australia is going to be my part time home and I will be relocating to somewhere.

    I have made plans for this day of reckoning for just over 2 years now. I have one year to watch if Perth return to the slumbering days of the 1990s. Overall, I have had a great time, with the Howard years, Greenspan bubbles and China boom. All good times come to an end. My retirement date is set.

  12. #32
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Hypocrite View Post
    Ok dude..all the best n will miss yr input on all oz shit...
    I want to be a wondering retiree, relocating to a place where it is easier for me to travel.
    But I will still want to be home in Perth for Spring or/and Autumn.

    This year is my month long trip to South America. After retirement, I plan to live in the Alsace region of France for a few months to test the Alsatian food and place and also the Rhône-Alpes region to stay with a Bresse chook farmer.

    I am just putting my knowledge about farming and quality food production to use.
    These topics do not interest a Sinkee or a miserable left wing union Aussie trash.
    So, stay in touch with the west end Perth people or the successful Asian Australian community.





    Along the way, I hope to take some very nice photographs.


    "Once upon a time a photographer was invited to have dinner at the home of a nice couple. During dinner the wife comments to the photographer “Your pictures are beautiful. You must have a great camera.” The photographer nods politely.
    After finishing dinner the photographer comments to the wife “That was a fine meal. You must have some great pots!"

  13. #33
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    No response from our troll.

    What I learnt ...

    Once you leave the clutches of LEEkapore, the world is your oyster. The trouble with Sinkees is that they are worrisome people, worried over this and that. Some people will just cross the road and worry later. But Sinkees still load themselves with useless baggage by the road kerb.

    The trouble with living as a Sinkee is of course the CLUTCHES. Some people do not mind because they are able to be left alone, and things like CPF do not matter. They have a few millions to buffer them and the LEEs are just irritants. They could even have escape plans.

    The less fortunate who find themselves slaving away for little returns - the ones who called the Aussies lazy - they are the ones with a lot to lose.
    In fact, some worked so hard that their engines failed before retirement, a few even dropped off like flies.

    Remind me of straitjacket Jap culture.

    Once you are free from LEE interference, you find that there are more opportunities that other countries offered, that are shut off from Sinkees.

    The list is too long to state here.

    But of course, if your idea of living is just shopping, having the latest gadgets and paying to screw a chiobu, you should remain a Sinkee.

    Anyone will know that the current Sinkee govt is below average. They are taking the easy way out at the expense of Sinkees. They are also doing things against the Singapore Constitution and the Singapore Laws. But no one dare raise a voice. Roy tried but he will be made to suffer under the Big Bully Loong, who is actually a coward, just ask Ho Ching.


    I will leave this forum with this, the Greatest Deception of our Times.

    Good luck!


    The deceptive calm of financial markets



    • ALAN KOHLER
    • <time class="meta--published-at" datetime="2014-05-28" title="Wednesday, 28th May 2014 - 8:07am [Melbourne]" style="box-sizing: border-box;">28 MAY, 8:07 AM</time>


    Even as Australian politics reaches new frenzies of fiscal conflict, the financial markets are a sea of tranquility. Monetary policy, in stark contrast to fiscal policy, is becalmed. No one expects anything much to happen for a year, either here or where the real decisions are made in Washington.

    But appearances can be deceiving: neither fiscal nor monetary policy is as it seems.

    In Canberra it is just modern politics as usual, with each side concocting ever more outrage in order to be heard above the clamour of the other. Politics has become a noise-equalising machine, and the media are the willing amplifiers.

    The budget is neither as good nor bad as declared. Fiscal policy is slightly tight over the period that can be usefully forecast and long-term spending cuts have been announced that would see a surplus in a decade while at the same time returning bracket creep to taxpayers.

    While there can be argument about some of the details (something of an understatement), the broad fiscal settings are basically sensible and moderate.

    Monetary policy, on the other hand, is wildly distorted. Financial markets might be calm but they are calm in a ‘Truman Show’ world where cash earns nothing and in Australia 2.5 per cent -- the lowest rate in 50 years. At some point, markets will bump up against the painted sky.

    In any properly functioning market, the clearing price is discovered. In today’s money market, the price is imposed, to reward borrowers and punish savers. Central banks have decreed that there are too few of the former and too many of the latter, and see it as their duty to even things up by manipulating the price.

    The tension is terrible. Nine months ago it erupted into what remains known as the 'taper tantrum', when prices suddenly fell on the realisation that the Federal Reserve would slow down its money printing at some point, resulting from some ham-fisted Fed pronouncements.

    The Fed then “recalibrated its guidance”, as the druids of this cult put it, and things calmed down. So calm are they now that the index of volatility (the Vix) both in Australia and the US is at a record low.

    This is normally the time to worry. Historically, complacency always precedes the greatest danger.

    In the United States, the only question that matters is when interest rates will start rising. That used to be the case in Australia too until the fiscal frenzy got cracking and produced a slump in consumer sentiment. Most economists still expect the next move to be up, but one or two voices are now wondering whether it might be down.
    In Europe, where inflation is still falling, the European Central Bank is now flagging more stimulus -- as early as next week.

    The consensus in the US is that rates will start rising next year, probably in the second half of the year, although some recent speeches from Fed officials have suggested it might be in the first half.

    For Australia, this cannot come soon enough. Our relatively high cash and bond rates (2.5 per cent versus zero and 3.75 versus 2.5 per cent) is keeping the exchange rate high and preventing the currency from acting as a ‘shock absorber’ to ease the economy’s transition from resource investment to other employment.
    In both Australia and the US, inflation is rising as many commodity prices rise, housing rents go up and better-off consumers prove willing to pay higher prices.
    The threat of deflation has passed, and although bond yields have been falling in recent months as investors take money off the sharemarket table and park it in the safety of bonds, central bankers are now actively talking about their exit from the Great Distortion.

    Monetary tightening always causes a bear market and a recession. It’s how the system works. Lower rates induce a boom; tightening, a bust.
    Last week, the President of the New York Fed, William Dudley, explained that this time around that the “equilibrium” interest rate (that is, undistorted) will be lower than previously because the Great Recession (what we called the GFC) “scarred households and businesses* -- this is likely to lead to greater precautionary saving and less investment for a long time”.

    Higher capital requirements for banks will also tend to produce a lower long-term interest rate, and so will the ageing of population because of lower participation and productivity.

    It means monetary policy will likely become restrictive more quickly.
    The next 12 months are uncharted territory for financial markets, as central banks begin to exit the Great Distortion.
    Australian politics, in contrast, has become all too charted.


  14. #34
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    dun look at me, i'm almost penniless BUT i wanted to be a "lazy' aussie too.

    but aussie import too many ah nehs for IT , just like stinkypore! so i couldn't enter thru skilled labor list once i graduated.

    try to look for fruit picking seasonal job, byt the time i found the details, i was over 30 and cannot qualify anymore.

    try to look mining job, kena all the fake recruitment office in stinkypore, want me to pay 500 dollah just for "admin fees". fuck care already. i wished i was born 10 years earlier. really missed the golden period of migration for aussie.
    List of my boycott establishments:-
    ALL SINKIE BUSINESSES. ALL OF THEM TRAITORS. No diggity, no doubt.

  15. #35
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    Great place to retire. Only a retard can dream of.

  16. #36
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    churros in the bay area are normally sold at roadside stalls and carts by illegal mexicans out for a quick buck. just don't know what kind of oil they are fried in.
    6.9 k's of sinkies: kopi, kaya toast, kueh kueh, kio kway, ktv, kpkb.

  17. #37
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    Quote Originally Posted by axe168 View Post
    How many of you keep staring at her chest ? How long it takes you to look away from the lady's chest? Mai ke ke... Admit it !!
    you got me. i'm more interested in the cleavage.
    6.9 k's of sinkies: kopi, kaya toast, kueh kueh, kio kway, ktv, kpkb.

  18. #38
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    Quote Originally Posted by eatshitndie View Post
    you got me. i'm more interested in the cleavage.

    What about those of Neatherals?


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  19. #39
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-09-0...ction=business


    Housing debt, budget deficit make Australia vulnerable to China shock: economist

    By business reporter Michael Janda
    Updated <time title="Sat 6 Sep 2014, 7:08am" class="relative " datetime="Sat Sep 06 2014 07:08:07 GMT+0800">Sat at 7:08amSat 6 Sep 2014, 7:08am</time>
    Photo: Prof Grafton says the trend for iron ore price is likely to remain down. (Rio Tinto/Christian Sprogoe)
    Map: Australia

    A former government resources economist warns that rising risky home lending and a persistent budget deficit make Australia's economy vulnerable to a Chinese economic shock next year.
    Professor Quentin Grafton from the Australian National University says the nation needs fundamental financial, fiscal and economic reforms to boost stability and productivity before it faces another global shock.
    "It's not business as usual as far as I'm concerned - we need to lift our game, otherwise there'll be shocks coming our way and we'll be ill-prepared for them," he told ABC News Online.
    Such a shock could emerge from China, where property prices have started falling amid concerns about an oversupply of new housing after several years of rampant apartment development.
    While Professor Grafton warns that he is no China expert, he was until 2013 the chief economist of the Federal Government's resources forecaster, and he sees no signs of a long-term iron ore price rebound.

    Audio: Domestic vulnerabilities could be exposed by China economic shock (ABC News)

    "The trend is downwards, what's generating the trend is a large increase in supply, at least in the context of iron ore quite a sizeable proportion of that from Australia," he said.
    "Then the third issue is the potential weakness in China itself in terms of a lot of infrastructure investment and building investment that's taking place - and then the question is will that continue at the same pace, and I think the answer to that is no it won't."
    The prices of Australia's key commodity exports have slumped - iron ore is down almost 40 per cent so far this year from $US135 a tonne in January to a five-year low of $US84.30 yesterday.
    However, the Australian dollar has stubbornly refused to follow the terms of trade lower, actually rising from 88.65 US cents at the start of January to 93.4 US cents today.
    RBA 'between rock and a hard place'

    Professor Grafton says the Reserve Bank is "between a rock and a hard place" of wanting a lower exchange rate while not being able to cut interest rates due to surging home prices in Australia's two largest cities.
    The RBA's governor Glenn Stevens effectively admitted as much himself in a speech on Wednesday.
    He argues that, while labelled as weak by many market economists, Australia's current annual growth rate of 3.1 per cent may be as good as conditions get for undertaking painful reforms.
    "There are real fragilities in the Australian economy we need to address, and we need to do the best we can given the circumstances we have in September 2014, rather than waiting for the end of 2015 when thing might be not as rosy as they are now," Professor Grafton said.
    Those reforms would include restraining the levels of home mortgage debt, addressing the Federal Government's deficit and making a range of productivity enhancing reforms, especially regarding taxation.
    Professor Grafton says the budget and taxation changes will take time, but need to start happening in this term of Parliament.
    However, he says macroprudential policies to reign in home lending are needed more urgently, with the final report of David Murray's Financial System Inquiry likely to provide some useful options later this year.
    "I think things will eventually happen, but I think we should be moving much faster than that," he said.
    Potential options include restrictions on the amount of high loan-to-value ratio loans that banks can issue, stricter tests on borrowers' ability to meet repayments in the face of rising interest rates, or a requirement for banks to hold more capital than they do currently to protect against home loan losses - this later option would also raise the cost of loans and/or lower the profit margins of the major banks.

  20. #40
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    Default Re: Australia, the lucky country.

    Enjoy the cleavage.. aka neh neh..

    Quote Originally Posted by eatshitndie View Post
    you got me. i'm more interested in the cleavage.
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