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    Default The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    Why Singaporeans aren't all glad to get the president they wanted
    By Tessa Wong
    BBC News, Singapore
    13 September 2017

    From the section Asia Share this with Facebook Share this with Twitter Share this with Messenger Share this with Email Share
    Former speaker of Singapore's parliament, Halimah Yacob, arrives at the Elections Department after she was given the certificate of eligibility to contest the election by the Presidential Elections Committee in Singapore 11 September 2017.Image copyrightREUTERS

    A popular public figure, Mrs Halimah was widely expected to win the presidential election, but instead will begin her term amid controversy.
    So why are Singaporeans not happy to get the president many wanted?
    'Selected, not elected'

    For starters, there hasn't been and won't be an election - she just got the job in a "walkover" because there were no other eligible candidates.
    Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, of the People's Action Party celebrates after winning the general election in Singapore on 12

    The PAP, led by Lee Hsien Loong (centre) has won every election in Singapore since independence in 1965
    Singaporeans are used to predictable elections, with the same party winning every parliamentary poll in the carefully managed country's 52-year history, last time with a landslide.

    It's partly due to loyalty to the ruling People's Action Party (PAP), but also because the government tightly controls the media and political freedoms.

    As the head of state, the president plays a largely ceremonial role and doesn't hold much power, apart from having some say in the use of Singapore's hefty financial reserves.

    Still, many were looking forward to exercising their vote this time round, and were angry to hear on Monday that Mrs Halimah was the only candidate.

    Why one party keeps winning Singapore's elections

    There were two other possible candidates in the running, businessmen Salleh Marican and Farid Khan.
    But a government-appointed committee decided they were not eligible as their companies didn't have at least $500m (£280m; $370m) in shareholders' equity, a rule that was recently tightened by the government.

    There are also many Singaporeans thrilled to see Mrs Halimah become president
    Mrs Halimah doesn't qualify under that rule either, but she made the cut because she used to be speaker in Singapore's parliament, and those who've held certain public office positions can qualify for the presidency.

    It has led some to joke online that the president has been "selected, not elected".

    Mrs Halimah, who is Muslim, is only the second president to come from the Malay ethnic minority.
    It's a move that should be celebrated by Singapore, which prides itself on its multiculturalism and diversity.
    But instead, this has fired up one of the biggest controversies of the presidency.

    That's because this election was only open to Malay candidates - the first time the government has reserved an election for a particular race.

    The government, which lauds its careful maintenance of national racial harmony, argued it was necessary to ensure minorities could have a chance at becoming president in Chinese-majority Singapore, which has always had an ethnically Chinese prime minister.
    But some Malays saw the move as positive discrimination that went against Singapore's golden rule of meritocracy, which is that the best person gets the job, regardless of background.

    It also stirred up questions about Malay racial purity, after people realised Mrs Halimah was half-Indian, and many have mocked her ethnicity.
    The irony is that Singapore's government has often clamped down on such discussion, fearing it would hurt racial harmony.
    Screenshot of comments on Singapore's 2017 presidential electionImage copyrightFACEBOOK
    "Racial questions are popping up... yet the G [government] cannot tamp this down because it had opened the can of worms in the first place," wrote political commentator Bertha Henson.

    "Now, the discussion is described as 'mature'' when, in other instances, it would have been slapped down as being inimical to social order."
    'How stupid they think we are'

    While some Singaporeans are delighted to see Mrs Halimah in office, others are unhappy at what they say is overt manipulation of the process by the government.

    Some believe the government deliberately took measures to block former presidential candidate Tan Cheng Bock, who came very close to defeating the government's man at the last election and who wanted to contest again.

    One popular joke online is a pun on Mr Tan's name, referencing the view that he was "blocked" from the election
    One view is that the government did not trust voters to choose their candidate this time round, despite the fact that it was Mrs Halimah, a former union leader who had broad appeal and was aided by extensive and favourable coverage in Singapore's state-friendly media.
    "Singaporeans have always known that our politicians... consider themselves superior beings," said writer Sudhir Thomas Vadaketh. "Now, with this reserved presidency, we have irrefutable proof about just how stupid they think we are."
    The government recently acknowledged the outrage by noting that the changes to the presidency might cost them "political capital", but argued it did what it had to do for "the future of the country".

    But some wonder if it has cost the country more. "The risk of we, the people, denying Halimah her mandate was probably too great for the PAP," wrote poet Alfian Sa'at.

    "And thus they would much rather deny us the right to confer her with a mandate... no matter how much cynicism and loss of trust it breeds towards our political systems."

    Singaporean artist Sonny Liew drew this comic referencing the belief among some that the election was rigged
    Singaporeans now have mixed feelings about their new president.

    Some, like the commentator Ms Henson, feel she is the "only good thing" in the whole episode and argue she is still "a decent person with a good heart", but others have accused her of complicity.

    Mrs Halimah, meanwhile, has largely sidestepped questions about the controversy.
    She told reporters earlier this week: "I promise to do the best that I can to serve the people of Singapore, and that doesn't change whether there is an election or no election."

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics-Eco...ctionSeptember 12, 2017 11:21 pm JST

    Singaporeans miffed by 'reserved' presidential election
    Social media bristles with discontent as Yacob prepares to enter office unopposed

    JUSTINA LEE, Nikkei staff writer

    Halimah Yacob was the only candidate given a certificate of eligibility on Sept. 11 by the Elections Department of Singapore. © Reuters
    SINGAPORE -- Singaporeans have taken to social media to express dissatisfaction that only Halimah Yacob has been approved to run for president later this month, thereby making a ballot unnecessary.

    Singapore's election department announced on Monday that Yacob, a former speaker of parliament, was the sole eligible candidate. This followed a significant amendment to the constitution earlier this year that reserves the office for a particular ethnic group if it has not been represented in the position for five consecutive terms.


    Twitter is being used to vent political frustration in Singapore.
    Singapore has a dominant ethnic Chinese population with Malay, Indian, and Eurasian minorities. Yacob is a Malay, and will be the first woman to occupy the largely ceremonial position. Her duties will include promoting good bilateral ties and safeguarding the national coffers.

    Ensuring equal opportunities and proper representation for all ethnicities have been keystones in establishing Singaporean national identity. The realization that voter participation would not be required sparked a Twitter storm that included the hashtag #notmypresident. Some said fundamental national principles had been trampled.

    "In a country whose core values are meritocracy, regardless of race, language or religion, this stinks of hypocrisy," Darren Teo tweeted.

    "It would have been a significant event for [Singapore] to elect her first female president, but now the word 'elected' has lost its meaning," tweeted Huiwen Zheng.

    Activist Gilbert Goh called for a silent sit-in protest this Saturday against voterless election. "It's time to unleash that frustration by showing up with like-minded Singaporeans together as one voice," he posted on Facebook.


    Activist Gilbert Goh used Facebook to call for a protest against Singapore's uncontested presidential election.
    Observers said the critical undertow was evidence of greater political awareness and sensitivity to race relations. Gillian Koh, deputy director of research at the Institute of Policy Studies said the reactions revealed a "division of opinion on how best Singapore's defining ideals of multiracialism, meritocracy, and prudent, honest governance should be balanced."

    "Those who are unhappy would have preferred the president receive an electoral mandate," she said.

    "Given that this is Singapore's first reserved election, it is a test of citizens' receptivity towards institutionalized means of ensuring minority representation," said Woo Jun Jie, an associate professor at Nanyang Technological University.

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    http://www.gulf-times.com/story/5635...ection-draws-p

    Singapore's 'walkover' presidential election draws public criticism September 12 2017 01:00 PM
    s that resulted in Singapore likely naming its first female president, Halimah Yacob, drew an outpouring of criticism on Tuesday.

    Yacob, 63, was the only candidate among three hopefuls to be declared eligible by the Elections Department on Monday, paving the way for a so-called ‘walkover’ election in which a candidate faces no opposition.

    Yacob automatically qualified on account of having held a key public position as speaker of parliament for three years.

    The other two contenders, Salleh Marican and Farid Khan, were both denied eligibility, having fallen short of a constitutional rule that required them to have led a company with shareholder equity of at least 500 million Singapore dollars (372 million US dollars).

    Some observers expressed support for the historic moment but others were disappointed that there would be no contest in an election reserved exclusively for candidates from the minority Malay community - the first of its kind in the city-state.

    On Tuesday, the hashtag #notmypresident was trending on Twitter in Singapore, with social media users expressing their ire at what they saw as the lack of a democratic process.

    ‘Democracy officially revealed to be dead in #Singapore,’ user John Tan wrote.

    ‘How did 'Elected Presidency' become 'Selected Presidency?'‘ another Twitter user wondered.

    Still others asked why the bar for presidential qualifications was not lowered in order to field more candidates.

    The election, which had been scheduled for September 23, will no longer be held and Yacob is expected to be formally declared the winner on Wednesday.

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    Singapore presidency with an asterisk and a government that was blindsided


    P N Balji
    Contributor
    Yahoo News Singapore13 September 2017

    Halimah Yacob’s presidency has been tainted. The eighth President of Singapore will continue to be haunted by an electoral process that pushed her into a whirlpool of vitriol as her status as a Malay was questioned and her financial nous put under the microscope.

    The 63-year-old made a strategic error in choosing to contest the presidential election as the government’s unofficial candidate. Today she stands accused of all kinds of cruel charges that are not worth mentioning here. Now we have an Elected President with an asterisk. Pity Halimah.

    I met her thrice. Each time, she impressed with her genteel nature and her desire to do good to workers and the disadvantaged. One of these occasions was when I took a group of Asian journalists to meet her. They were in Singapore as part of a three-month fellowship programme. They came out impressed with the way she spoke to her constituents who had gone to see her as part of her meet-the-people session.

    If she had fought an open election, she could have won it without much difficulty. If Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong had not manoeuvred too hastily to change the rules of the game and if he had understood his populace better and managed the process smartly, we would be celebrating Singapore’s first woman President and a tudung-wearing one at that. Pity Singapore.

    The run-up to the election has inflicted a serious wound, especially on Malays, which will take a long time to heal. There are enough Malays who feel that they have been turned into political pawns in the People Action Party’s game to stop presidential hopeful Tan Cheng Bock from contesting.

    Many Malays have questioned the very basis of this election. In the first place, they didn’t feel the need to have a Malay President and even if they felt the need they would have preferred one who contested on equal terms, not on a preferential basis. By putting such a high bar — experience of managing a company with $500 million shareholder equity in the last three years for private-sector candidates — the government must have known that getting qualified Malays to contest would have been an impossible task.

    Even if there were individuals who would have qualified, not many would have wanted to fight the government’s unofficial candidate. PM Lee said confidently when he was asked if there were Malays who would qualify, “There are qualified Malays, there are qualified Singaporeans.” Today those words are being ridiculed.

    Worse, there was so much scrutiny on the Malayness of the three contestants that forced many Malays to ask themselves whether there was a true-blue Malay among themselves.

    This debate is something PM and his team had never expected and it shows how the government had been totally blindsided by an electorate that would chuck the official narrative aside and let their counter narrative prevail. The implications are huge as the government’s control of its message will be muddied and muddled by a population that will use social media to press their points of view.

    If there is one political lesson to be learnt by the government from this badly-thought-out exercise it is this: Don’t take Singaporeans for granted.

    Writer’s note: This is my first commentary on the Elected Presidency. I and two others were in the media team helping presidential hopeful Salleh Marican and felt conflicted about it. Now that our engagement with Salleh is over, I am free to write. I have not used any information from my work for him in this article.

    P N Balji is a veteran Singaporean journalist who was formerly chief editor of Today, as well as an editor at The New Paper. He is currently a media consultant. The views expressed are his own.

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    https://www.nst.com.my/world/2017/09...t-without-vote

    Anger as Singapore gets first female president without a vote

    Singapore's new president-elect Halimah Yacob (R) greets her supporters at the nomination centre in Singapore on September 13, 2017. An establishment stalwart was named Singapore's first female president on September 13 but the milestone was overshadowed by criticism her selection was undemocratic after she was handed the job without a vote. AFP Photo
    By AFP - September 13, 2017 @ 10:40pm

    SINGAPORE: Singapore got its first female president Wednesday, but the milestone was overshadowed by criticism that her selection was undemocratic after she was handed the job without a vote.

    Halimah Yacob, a former speaker of parliament from the Muslim Malay minority, did not have to face an election for the largely ceremonial post after authorities decided her rivals did not meet eligibility criteria.

    It was not the first time in the affluent city-state – which is tightly controlled and has been ruled by the same party for decades – that the government has disqualified presidential candidates, making an election unnecessary.

    But there was already unease about the process as it was the first time that the presidency had been reserved for a particular race, in this case the Malay community. The decision to hand her the job without an election added to the anger.

    Social media was abuzz with criticism as Halimah, a bespectacled 63-year-old who wears a headscarf, was formally announced as president-elect, with Facebook user Pat Eng writing: “Elected without an election. What a joke.”

    “I will call her President Select from now on,” said Joel Kong on the networking site, while some posts were marked with the hashtag #NotMyPresident – echoing the message used by upset Americans after the election of President Donald Trump.

    Halimah was a member of parliament for the ruling People’s Action Party for nearly two decades before resigning to contest the presidency. She addressed the concerns about the selection process after being named president-elect.

    “I’m a president for everyone. Although there’s no election, my commitment to serve you remains the same,” she said.

    Halimah added she would “start working immediately” to bring the country together.

    She also insisted her status as Singapore’s first female president was “not just tokenism“, in a speech to a cheering crowd while wearing orange, a colour supposed to symbolise unity.

    “Every woman can aspire to the highest office in the land when you have the courage, determination and will to work hard,” she said.

    Singapore’s head of state has limited powers, including vetoing senior official appointments. But an establishment figure has always held the role and there are rarely tensions with the government.

    Authorities decided to allow only candidates from the Malay community to put themselves forward for the presidency to foster harmony in the city-state of 5.5 million people which is dominated by ethnic Chinese, and give more opportunities to minorities.

    Halimah is the first Malay president of Singapore for almost five decades. The last was Yusof Ishak, president from 1965 to 1970, the first years of the city-state’s independence.

    But the decision to limit candidates to one race had caused concern, including among Malays, as it was seen as positive discrimination that ran counter to the city-state’s traditional meritocratic principles.

    Five people had originally put their names forward for the presidency and the government had scheduled an election for September 23.

    Two were quickly eliminated as they were not Malay. The two others, Malay businessmen, were disqualified on Monday as their companies were smaller than required by strict new eligibility rules introduced last year.

    Halimah automatically qualified as she has held public office. She will be inaugurated in a ceremony on Thursday. --AFP

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    http://www.news24.com/World/News/sin...-vote-20170913

    Singapore gets first female president without a vote
    2017-09-13 13:13

    Singapore - An establishment stalwart was named Singapore's first female president on Wednesday but the milestone was overshadowed by criticism her selection was undemocratic after she was handed the job without a vote.

    Halimah Yacob, a former speaker of Parliament from the Muslim Malay minority, did not have to face an election for the largely ceremonial post originally due this month after authorities decided her rivals did not meet strict eligibility criteria.

    It was not the first time in the affluent city-state - which is tightly controlled and has been ruled by the same party for decades - that the government has disqualified candidates for the presidency, making an election unnecessary.

    But there was already unease about the process as it was the first time that the presidency had been reserved for a particular ethnic group, in this case the Malay community, and the decision to hand her the job without a vote added to anger.

    Social media was abuzz with criticism as Halimah, a bespectacled 63-year-old who wears a headscarf, was formally announced as the president-elect, with Facebook user Pat Eng writing: "Elected without an election. What a joke."

    "I will call her President Select from now on," said Joel Kong on the networking site, while some posts were marked with the hashtag NotMyPresident - echoing the message used by upset Americans after the election of President Donald Trump.

    Halimah, a member of Parliament for the ruling People's Action Party for nearly two decades before resigning to contest the presidency, tackled the doubts about the selection process in a speech to a cheering crowd after she was named president-elect.

    "I'm a president for everyone. Although there's no election, my commitment to serve you remains the same," she said.

    Authorities had decided to allow only candidates from the Malay community to put themselves forward for the presidency, a bid to foster harmony in the city-state of 5.5 million people which is dominated by ethnic Chinese.

    Singapore's head of state has limited powers, including vetoing senior official appointments, but an establishment figure has always held the role and there are rarely tensions with the government.

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    Quote Originally Posted by scroobal View Post
    http://www.gulf-times.com/story/5635...ection-draws-p

    Singapore's 'walkover' presidential election draws public criticism September 12 2017 01:00 PM
    s that resulted in Singapore likely naming its first female president, Halimah Yacob, drew an outpouring of criticism on Tuesday.

    Yacob, 63, was the only candidate among three hopefuls to be declared eligible by the Elections Department on Monday, paving the way for a so-called ‘walkover’ election in which a candidate faces no opposition.

    Yacob automatically qualified on account of having held a key public position as speaker of parliament for three years.

    The other two contenders, Salleh Marican and Farid Khan, were both denied eligibility, having fallen short of a constitutional rule that required them to have led a company with shareholder equity of at least 500 million Singapore dollars (372 million US dollars).

    Some observers expressed support for the historic moment but others were disappointed that there would be no contest in an election reserved exclusively for candidates from the minority Malay community - the first of its kind in the city-state.

    On Tuesday, the hashtag #notmypresident was trending on Twitter in Singapore, with social media users expressing their ire at what they saw as the lack of a democratic process.

    ‘Democracy officially revealed to be dead in #Singapore,’ user John Tan wrote.

    ‘How did 'Elected Presidency' become 'Selected Presidency?'‘ another Twitter user wondered.

    Still others asked why the bar for presidential qualifications was not lowered in order to field more candidates.

    The election, which had been scheduled for September 23, will no longer be held and Yacob is expected to be formally declared the winner on Wednesday.
    If even the GCC press is citing how laughable this has been we have truly hit rock bottom (not that there was any doubt previously).

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    Do good, Do together!

    123 321 PAP is Numba 1!

    HUAT AH!!!!!!!!!!!

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    I reality, nobody outside Singapore gives a hoot about how Singaporeans feel. As far as the rest of the world is concerned, Singapore is a well governed place where everything works, crime is low, the state is efficient, people enjoy a high standard of living. Things like COE, PSLE, CBD, HDB is Greek to non-Greeks, and Punjabi to Greeks. Nobody cares. Singapore is a democratic country which observes and is compliant with UN laws and Human Rights. It is paradise.

    Cheers!

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    The BBC is pretty scared of the government here….you should have seen stephen sackur doing hardtalk with the little emperor.
    He practised anything but hard talk.

    what does the headline here even mean….how does anyone know this is the president we wanted?

    Quote Originally Posted by scroobal View Post
    Why Singaporeans aren't all glad to get the president they wanted
    By Tessa Wong
    BBC News, Singapore
    13 September 2017

    So why are Singaporeans not happy to get the president many wanted?

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    Time to dump PAP change it to DAP.

    This is not a People but Dishonorable Action Party aka DAP.

    It is a DAP that won the EP. The people action did not like the DAP conduct of doing biz with the people.

    DAP can stand along side w BE evil race pommies.

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    That shameless pm did not even stand up during the little India riot. He went MIA.

    Expect this xia suay hakka to speak up.

    Wait long long tan ku ku. He also go MIA now.


    Quote Originally Posted by bobby View Post
    The other big joke is that the gahmen never even bother to come out and talk about the controversy and address the many unhappy citizens....unless, of course they are blind and deaf.

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    truth be told, this is how the world views our president episode :



    any more than this and you're simply delusional

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    This woman is truly delusional - she wants to unite the people. She divided the nation, made a fool of the Malay community and she wants to unite? No President of Singapore ever thought or said that he wanted to unite the people. The role of President is to represent the country and its people.

    Please god, get a half decent spin doctor to save her from her own BS. And she is legally trained.


    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/...lenges-9216844

    ‘My duty is to unite the people, to overcome the many challenges ahead’: President Halimah Yacob
    In a troubled and uncertain world, Singapore’s shared values of multiculturalism, meritocracy and stewardship become even more important in guiding the nation, said President Halimah Yacob on Thursday (Sep 14).

    14 Sep 2017 06:41PM (Updated: 14 Sep 2017 07:24PM)

    SINGAPORE: In a troubled and uncertain world, Singapore’s shared values of multiculturalism, meritocracy and stewardship become even more important in guiding the nation, said President Halimah Yacob on Thursday (Sep 14).

    Speaking after being sworn in as Singapore’s eighth President, Mdm Halimah said: “My duty is to unite the people, to overcome the many challenges ahead of us, together.

    “I call on all Singaporeans to join me in this endeavour. Our goal must be to leave behind a better Singapore for future generations.”

    The inauguration at the Istana came a day after Mdm Halimah was declared President-elect, as she was the only person to qualify for an election that was reserved for members of the Malay community.

    Mdm Halimah said she welcomes recent constitutional changes which allow for an election to be reserved for a particular racial group if no one from that group has been president for five continuous terms, but noted the unhappiness among some Singaporeans.

    “I know that some Singaporeans would prefer to achieve this without needing reserved elections. I respect their views,” the President said in her speech.

    “Like them, I look forward to the day when we will no longer need to rely on the provision to have reserved elections, and Singaporeans naturally and regularly elect citizens of all races as Presidents.”

    She added: “Today, I want to assure all Singaporeans that as your President, I will serve every one of you, regardless of race, language or religion.”

    MULTIRACIALISM, MERITOCRACY, STEWARDSHIP

    Singapore’s first female President focused much of her speech on the shared values multiracialism, meritocracy and stewardship.

    She said even though Singapore has made great progress building a multi-racial society over the years, it is “a constant work in progress”.

    “Every generation must update our institutions to strengthen our shared values, and every generation needs champions who care deeply about multi-racialism and fight to uphold and realise this ideal,” said Mdm Halimah.

    On meritocracy, the President said she has “strong personal convictions” about upholding this core value. “Without it, I would not be here today,” she said, recalling a difficult childhood losing her father when she was young and growing up in poverty.

    “My life story is not uncommon in Singapore. Many of you have stories similar to mine, or know someone who has. This is something special and precious to Singapore.”

    To help the less privileged, Mdm Halimah said she will build on the good work her predecessors Dr Tony Tan and the late Mr SR Nathan have done in supporting the President’s Challenge.

    Lastly on stewardship, Mdm Halimah spoke about the important of taking care of one another and working together to tackle issues such as the ageing population, disruption in the economy and the threat of terrorism.

    Amid investments in various social programmes and initiatives to grow the economy, Mdm Halimah said there is a need to husband Singapore’s reserves carefully.

    “The President holds the second key to our reserves, and to key appointments in the public service. In exercising my custodial powers, I will use my independent judgement, consulting the Council of Presidential Advisors, and working closely with the Prime Minister and the Government.”

    Mdm Halimah said being President is a “heavy responsibility”, and that she will strive to do her best to serve Singapore.

    Thanking all Singaporeans for their support, she said she is “deeply touched” by the good wishes and words of encouragement. She also thanked the labour movement, where she served in various roles for three decades.

    “I have learned (from the labour movement) much about compassion and camaraderie. I know that these lessons will help me in my new role.”

    She concluded: “In my previous roles, I have seen how much we can achieve by working together … I pledge to continue this journey of service to our country. I call on all Singaporeans to join me in this endeavour.

    “We must measure our success not just by how well we do for ourselves, but by whether we enable the next generation to do even better. Let us commit ourselves to this task, and together create a brighter future for all Singaporeans.”
    Source: CNA/gs

    Read more at http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/...lenges-9216844

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    Quote Originally Posted by scroobal View Post
    Please god, get a half decent spin doctor to save her from her own BS. And she is legally trained.
    I think god heard you

    http://thir.st/blog/angry-about-pres...halimah-yacob/

    Bwahahahahahahaa...
    i am an ordinary sinkie sheep!!!

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    Quote Originally Posted by ;2642994
    “I know that some Singaporeans would prefer to achieve this without needing reserved elections. I respect their views,” the President said in her speech.

    “Like them, I look forward to the day when we will no longer need to rely on the provision to have reserved elections, and Singaporeans naturally and regularly elect citizens of all races as Presidents.
    ”[/url]
    You, Halimah, do not have the qualification to tell Singaporeans that in future we no longer need to rely on the provision of reserved election, In fact, this very provision put you as an appointed president today without a proper mandate. Instead of telling us what you expect future to be like, why not prove to us today, show us that you do not need this provision and you can independently compete with other candidate, on fair ground, to earn your mandate. Otherwise, you are just bullshitting through your ass and nobody is going buy your sarcasm.
    #notmypresident#

    List of my boycott establishments:-

    Tung Lok
    Breadtalk/Toast Box
    Jollibee
    Citibank (who employed more than 40% foreigners)
    La Fonde restuarant
    ...will add on to the blacklist as deemed necessary for patriotic reason.

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    Quote Originally Posted by scroobal View Post
    This woman is truly delusional - she wants to unite the people. She divided the nation, made a fool of the Malay community and she wants to unite? No President of Singapore ever thought or said that he wanted to unite the people. The role of President is to represent the country and its people.

    Please god, get a half decent spin doctor to save her from her own BS. And she is legally trained.


    [/url]
    Gosh - is this TPL as President? And she was a Minister too!





    Last edited by gatehousethetinkertailor; 14-09-2017 at 03:19 PM.

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    Default Re: The laughing stock of the World - Our President

    From the Economist:



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