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Thread: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by nayr69sg View Post
    Yes because the tudung is meant to hide all the parts of the body that if men see already will want to rape the woman.

    So when the woman wear tudung she believes that if she don't she will kena raped.
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    But why she wants to try to "beautify" herself and tempt others with red lipstick?

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by Victory2016 View Post
    I will only believe Halimah is not a PAP puppet if she dare to appoint a Malay as Chief of the Armed Forces.

    Otherwise, she ranks very low in my sight.

    #Not my machik
    i dun blame u as i hv no choice but look down at her..

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by scroobal View Post
    I am told by that not a single Malay automatically qualifies who is not a politician. BOS is actually a division of OCBC, no shareholders equity. Po'ad will not qualify and both must be considered under deliberative track. Though Po'ad is well regarded. First is a full Malay and second is not.
    Sigh - till now despite all that has has happened they still don't understand the basic requirements so how do you progress with analytical thinking on such issues?:




  4. #24
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    Default Re: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?

    This is laughable. Now need to arrow rich Malays who did not contest. This whole idiotic thing could have been avoided if the race criteria was removed. But we all know that is impossible since Tan Cheng Bock is a sure-win.
    PM Lee Kuan Yew: “Whoever governs Singapore must have that iron in him. Or give it up. This is not a game of cards. This is your life and mine. I’ve spent a whole lifetime building this and as long as I’m in charge, nobody is going to knock it down.”
    #Hatersgonnahate

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    Default Re: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?


  6. #26
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    Default Re: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by bobby View Post
    Is Halimah "very religious"?
    she appears to be observant.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie99 View Post
    she appears to be observant.
    Arguably it as a matter of degree - she maintains the tudung as a sign of modesty but does not hesitate to shake hands and allow people (men included) to embrace her (own admission) and attend non-halal events such as recently cited re: Hungry Ghost.

    So I would say she is still the old school type of Muslims we grew up with in SIngapore. Ironically (you may not see this as you are in Canada) the stricter ones/halal police types are the younger generation who are much more vigilante in their outlook. Ironic but true.

    The HalalFood Blog may be a foodie site but they are part of the vigilante squad - in the old days, the Muslims would say as long as it is not pork I am ok with it - these days the first thing the sticter adherents rally for is Halal certification - Muslim owned is actually frowned upon and the message is "approach at your own risk".

    Times have really changed on the ground here and the older generation are actually made to feel guilty for their liberal attitudes to religion and co-existence by the younger generation.
    Last edited by gatehousethetinkertailor; 13-09-2017 at 03:33 PM.

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by gatehousethetinkertailor View Post
    Arguably it as a matter of degree - she maintains the tudung as a sign of modesty but does not hesitate to shake hands and allow people (men included) to embrace her (own admission) and attend non-halal events such as recently cited re: Hungry Ghost.

    So I would say she is still the old school type of Muslims we grew up with in SIngapore. Ironically (you may not see this as you are in Canada) the stricter ones/halal police types are the younger generation who are much more vigilante in their outlook. Ironic but true.

    The HalalFood Blog may be a foodie site but they are part of the vigilante squad - in the old days, the Muslims would say as long as it is not pork I am ok with it - these days the first thing the sticter adherents rally for is Halal certification - Muslim owned is actually frowned upon and the message is "approach at your own risk".

    Times have really changed on the ground here and the older generation are actually made to feel guilty for their liberal attitudes to religion and co-existence by the younger generation.
    Religion is relative and is as individual as it can be.
    Individuals can be very observant, orthodox, or liberal
    (for example: the Jews, can be orthodox, conservative, reformed, etc.)

    I wonder whether or not she will shake the hands of stranger males?

    I believe that it is unacceptable to for those who insist that they cover the head and face, only exposing the eyes.
    I recall that recently, in Quebec, the Provincial government indicated that individuals of a certain religion, must not cover their faces when they are posing for photos for their drivers' licence.


    I grew up in Singapore, and in the old days, as long as there is no pork, it was OK.
    Last edited by Charlie99; 13-09-2017 at 03:55 PM.

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    Default Re: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie99 View Post
    Religion relative and is as individual as it can be.
    Individuals can be very observant, orthodox, or liberal
    (for example: the Jews, can be orthodox, conservative, reformed, etc.)

    I wonder whether or not she will shake the hands of stranger males?

    I believe that it is unacceptable to for those who insist that they cover the head and face, only exposing the eyes.
    I recall that recently, in Quebec, the Provincial government indicated that individuals of a certain religion, must not cover their faces when they are posing for photos for their drivers' licence.


    I grew up in Singapore, and in the old days, as long as there is no pork, it was OK.
    Unfortunately there are a smattering of those niqab adherents in SG - what they do not seem to realise that it is very rare for the normal Arab muslim woman in the Gulf (where this practice originates from) to actually don the niqab because it is tribal when they do. Sadly this adaptation is also misplaced in the local context but pushed by a younger generation.

    I am very familiar with Jewish practices as have spent considerable time amongst Ashkenazis and Sephardim in various parts of Israel (and Palestine), New York, LA, Toronto, London of varying religious adherents. So I understand and appreciate the distinctions. Also know the Rabbi at Waterloo Street and have spent many a Sabbath here with the local adherents. On Saturdays you will see two Japanese kids with payots attending service, dressed completely as Akenazim (mum is Japanese, dad is from LA but of Russian descent).

    And yes, HY shakes hands - she has never pulled back from strangers and in her position is hard for her to.
    Last edited by gatehousethetinkertailor; 13-09-2017 at 03:53 PM.

  10. #30
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    Default Re: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by gatehousethetinkertailor View Post
    Unfortunately there are a smattering of those niqab adherents in SG - what they do not seem to realise that it is very rare for the normal Arab muslim woman in the Gulf (where this practice originates from) to actually don the niqab because it is tribal when they do. Sadly this adaptation is also misplaced in the local context but pushed by a younger generation.

    I am very familiar with Jewish practices as have spent considerable time amongst Ashkenazis and Sephardim in various parts of Israel (and Palestine), New York, LA, Toronto, London of varying religious adherents. So I understand and appreciate the distinctions. Also know the Rabbi at Waterloo Street and have spent many a Sabbath here with the local adherents. On Saturdays you will see two Japanese kids with payots attending service, dressed completely as Akenazim (mum is Japanese, dad is from LA but of Russian descent).

    And yes, HY shakes hands - she has never pulled back from strangers and in her position is hard for her to.
    I am knowledgeable and familiar with Jews.
    There is an Ashkenazi Festival in Toronto, usually the long weekend in early Sep.
    One of my NCO's during NS grew up at the Shul on Waterloo Street, because his father was the caretaker there.
    One of my old friends, usually invite me to his office for Passover meals, although I have done any work with him for many years.

  11. #31
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    Default Re: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?

    Things have changed in the last 20years in a gradual manner. Few Malays accompany their work colleagues for lunch. In the past, they would go together but eat halal food. Few Malays now accept weddings invitations even though Halal tables are arranged. They actually hand over the gifts or ang pow before hand. Its now customary for non Muslim colleagues to occupy the Halal table to keep Malay friends and colleagues company so they do not feel left out.

    Its now more common to ask a Muslim colleague to handle catering for office events. In the past, catering organised by non -muslim colleagues with halal caterers and with a copy of halal certificate are provided was the norm. Its no longer comfortable.

  12. #32
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    Default Re: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by scroobal View Post
    Things have changed in the last 20years in a gradual manner. Few Malays accompany their work colleagues for lunch. In the past, they would go together but eat halal food. Few Malays now accept weddings invitations even though Halal tables are arranged. They actually hand over the gifts or ang pow before hand. Its now customary for non Muslim colleagues to occupy the Halal table to keep Malay friends and colleagues company so they do not feel left out.

    Its now more common to ask a Muslim colleague to handle catering for office events. In the past, catering organised by non -muslim colleagues with halal caterers and with a copy of halal certificate are provided was the norm. Its no longer comfortable.
    It appears that "these recent restrictions or observances" may be not as inclusive and community friendly as the 1970's.
    In the past (already discussed at other threads), we play, mix and chat with Malays and Indians.
    Regardless of the the "HDB quota" policies, to me, it is not the same as before.
    I could speak Malay, simply from playing and interacting with Malays.
    Is Singapore becoming more cosmopolitan, where Singaporeans do not mix, mingle and play like the old days,
    when the government discouraged individuals from speaking Chinese dialects, but with respect,
    the spoken English and Mandarin sound so painful.

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    Default Re: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie99 View Post
    It appears that "these recent restrictions or observances" may be not as inclusive and community friendly as the 1970's.
    In the past (already discussed at other threads), we play, mix and chat with Malays and Indians.
    Regardless of the the "HDB quota" policies, to me, it is not the same as before.
    I could speak Malay, simply from playing and interacting with Malays.
    Is Singapore becoming more cosmopolitan, where Singaporeans do not mix, mingle and play like the old days,
    when the government discouraged individuals from speaking Chinese dialects, but with respect,
    the spoken English and Mandarin sound so painful.
    this is not confined to sg alone. i had muslim colleagues who started changing too, after 9/11. instead of blasting the perpetrators of 9/11, they celebrated in silence. could see smirks on their faces and fist pumping. not only that, instead of opening up and becoming more sociable they dug in. no more lunches together, no more picnics, no more team building exercises, no more jokes, no more friendly banter. they started sporting beards, their wives started wearing head covering (these were some of the chioest wives in the company and they used to flaunt their bodies in sexy clothes), and their children were muted from talking to others. could see these kids struggling in schools trying to blend in. instead they stood out with self-imposed silence and seclusion. years later they quit their jobs and disappeared from social media. they reclused themselves to their own circle of likeminded friends and family.

    for anyone here who claims that this is unique to sg and is a result of pap's mishandling of the malay (muslim) community, heshe is mistaken. there was a far more powerful global beacon of change since 9/11. 9/11 was the equivalent of the atomic bomb going off in hiroshima during the ww2. while the atomic bomb signaled the closing of world war, 9/11 signaled the start of a new world war. the signal and martyrdom of those terrorists were meant as a wakeup message not so much to the western world but as rise-up call to arms and action for all muslims, half-hearted, sleeping, west-loving, devout, fanatic, all. the message was that the west could be defeated by their own follies, freedom, liberalism, and openness. "do the opposite, go extreme, and be true to your calling and religion." that message had percolated throughout the afghan and iraq wars and were amplified by terrorist victories after arab springs in north africa, middle east, and specifically syria and iraq.

    i document life in sg with photos before 9/11 and after, and i can see the sea change in my photo collection. no local gov can prevent nor mitigate the change. it was a global event, and unfolding events continue to morph the behavior of muslims. nobody wants to talk about this in sg, but if you're looking for a root cause, dna-altering and earth-shaking events such as 9/11 and arab spring with the help of instant (fake and real) news and social media need to be accounted for the bulk of the change.
    6.9 k's of sinkies: kopi, kaya toast, kueh kueh, kio kway, ktv, kpkb.

  14. #34
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    Default Re: Does Halimah have Veto Powers to appoint a Malay Chief of the Armed Forces?

    Thank you for the info

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