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Thread: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

  1. #15781
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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    eat bf. price gone up slightly already
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    Last edited by donkey; 10-07-2017 at 02:31 AM.

  2. #15782
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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Quote Originally Posted by yinyang View Post
    Miss Grand Thailand
    Yo Grand as in what grand? Grandmother? These women looked old.

  3. #15783
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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Quote Originally Posted by donkey View Post
    eat bf. price gone up slightly already
    Wahlau you very jiak-ark show me this make me so gian. Yes this RuyiYuan at blk 46-1 is the best.

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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Surprisingly Thais love pizzas too but often from Pizza Hut or The Pizza Company most popular, fast food style. Thais like their pizza thick and sweet so Hawaiian is one of their fav with lots of chili powder. These are pizzas I will not take cos I prefer reall Italian style and thin crust.

    There is a pretty good pizza chain most of ten found in malls known as Scoozi Pizza, I wonder if its available in Singapore. This is a typical Scoozi restaurant thaqt I passed by in the Promenade Mall



    Its a sit-in dining restaurant that also serves wine



    Decided to order a Diavola which cost 320 baht however by the time I topped up : extra pepperoni ; italian spicy sausage ; mushrooms it ballooned to 650 baht

    The guy preparing my order










    Finally




    Afternoon beer and this pizza what more can a man ask for?

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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Laem Chareon Seafood started its business in Rayong city, a city by the sea more than 30 years ago. Today they have branches all over Thailand and can often be found in in Central malls. Seafood is very Thai style of cooking quality is very consistent in the branches.


    http://www.laemcharoenseafood.com



    Was in the branch close to home last night and had these:






    Cabbage in fish sauce - very fragrant of wok smell




    Creeper vege fried with garlic and chili




    Oyster omelette




    Steamed prawns




    Crab meat in tang hoon - this is very good as its cooked with lard




    Snow fish in soya




    Salted fish fried rice




    The meal costs only 2,085 baht or $85




  6. #15786
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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Today breakfast is Nasi Lemak at SQ Silverkris lounge in Suvarnabhumi airport






    Coffee and tea




    Beautiful bread



    Full bar with bartender




    Eggs




    Perfect half-boiled egg




    Salad




    Nasi lemak




    Nasi lemak condiments

  7. #15787
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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Thought this was informative, given the rip off prices elsewhere for a view

    Five best viewpoints in Bangkok (without paying an arm and a leg)

    Travel log June 19, 2017 10:53

    Unlike hilly Hong Kong or rocky Rio de Janeiro, Bangkok is about as flat as it’s possible to be, so finding an elevated view to take a photo from can be frustrating.

    Yet despite the total absence of natural hills, there are plenty of man-made structures that give a pretty good panorama over the city, although it has to be said that most are not free and some are down-right pricey.

    Here are our top five recommended viewpoints in the city where the entrance fee isn’t stratospheric and you don’t have to wear a jacket and tie to get in.


    1. Wat Saket and the Golden Mount: The Golden Mount offers reasonable views over the Rattanakosin area of Bangkok, Ratchadamnoen Avenue and the temple of Wat Saket below. Getting to the peak of this manmade hill requires a trek up around 300 steps or so along a broad and winding stairway, which is perhaps best undertaken in the morning or evening and not in the hot season. Atop the hill is a breezy golden pagoda and a good place to shoot off a few photos.

      Since this is a Buddhist temple, appropriate dress is required (covered shoulders and legs). A good time to go is in November when a spectacular bustling temple fair is organized and it’s also relatively cool. The entrance fee is just 20 baht.

    2. Baiyoke Tower II: At 328 metres, Baiyoke Tower II was the tallest building in Thailand for 19 years, before being knocked into second place by Mahanakorn in 2016. The views from the observation deck on the 77th floor and the revolving viewpoint on the 84th floor pretty much cover the whole urban sprawl of Bangkok, right out to the Gulf of Thailand on a clear day. The views of the Pratunam area and the Bangkok expressway system are particularly iconic.From 10.00-17.00 the entrance fee is 350 baht, which includes a fruit buffet at the Fruit Court on the 18th floor. From 17.00-23.00 the price goes up to 400 baht inclusive of a drink on the rooftop bar on the 83rd floor. The prices make it one of the city’s cheaper rooftop venues.

    3. Cloud 47: Located on top of the United Center on Silom Road, Cloud 47 is one of the more reasonably priced casual rooftop bars to be found in the city. It gives a great vantage point over the skyscrapers of Silom and Sathorn Roads, as well as Lumpini Park and the Sukhumvit area beyond.Cloud 47 offers drinks, fusion food and live music later in the evening but arguably the best time to be there is at sunset when the vibe is particularly laid back. You can take photos of the 360-degree views but would-be pros should note that tripods are not allowed.

    4. The Deck: Situated in Arun Residence by the Chao Phraya River, the Deck restaurant isn’t situated in a high-rise building but it does offer unobstructed vistas of the River of Kings and Wat Arun (the Temple of Dawn), perhaps Bangkok’s most iconic landmark. You can enjoy a drink at the bar and then sample the Thai/international cuisine but there’s little argument that it’s the view that most people go for. To get there, take a ferry to Tha Tien Pier, then walk along Maharaj Road to the alley with a red-brick pavement. Arun Residence is at the end. Go at sunset and later for the most captivating views.


    342 Bar: This bar is located on the fifth-floor rooftop of the Baan Wanglang Riverside Hotel, on the Thonburi side of the river, not far from Siriraj Hospital. The place is away from the tourist crowds so you can kickback, relax and enjoy the views down river of many of Bangkok’s classic landmarks – Wat Arun, the Grand Palace, Wat Phra Kieow and, in the opposite direction up river, the majestic span of the Rama VIII Bridge. Enjoy the magnificent panorama with one of the bar’s signature vodka cocktails and some bar snacks, without breaking the bank.
    The best way to get there is to take the Chao Phraya Express boat from BTS Saphan Taksin to Wanglang (Prannok Pier). Take the first path to the left and walk through Wanglang Market for about 300 metres toward Wat Rakang. Baan Wangla

    http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/Travel_log/30318574


  8. #15788
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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Was over at LOS last weekend.



    Stayed at dusit thani

    room





    view outside room









    freaking huge hotel but a bit dated i think okura prestige and the hotels at chit lom, wireless, siam would be newer and slightly nicer but it's still a 5 star hotel and right next to silom mrt.







    Amazing massage place it has










    room service





    time to head down to bangyai. Since the purple line si muang is up and running for quite some time now it's quite convinent to travel from dusit thani at silom to bang sue and then to tao poon which is the 1st station of the purple line at the bkk side there are many stations to travel thru though. I rather take a cab or grab directly to central westgate.

    Some student scrabble competition organized by brand's essence of chicken at westgate hopefully their english is good enough to enable them to beat other country's students.




    A meal at talad bangyai





    Next day had a meal with friend and her family. Since this occured on a saturday which is asahna bucha day which is a buddhist holiday alcohol cannot be served in all establishments and nana plaza was closed btw. However if you know ppl you can still buy beer from the mom and pop stores and the beer is openly served no police will charge anyone cos i suppose it's quite a far away place and not in central bkk.

    Steamboat



    Her mother.



    Half sister with her daughter, she told me her mum remarried like 3 times while her dad who passed away had a mia noi aka a small wife which caused her mum to be mad and divorce him. Apparently it's very common for thais to do this but what's surprising to me is that she and her half sister are so cool with one another. I think in the sg context someone wouldn't want to speak with his half sibling although i know of a sinkie guy who speaks to his half brother.




    Will be sharing more to come.
    Last edited by Jah_rastafar_I; 11-07-2017 at 03:31 PM.

  9. #15789
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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Quote Originally Posted by Jah_rastafar_I View Post
    Was over at LOS last weekend.
    Stayed at dusit thani
    Enjoy the stay. The hotel is closing soon to be redeveloped. Such a shame, this was where all the foreign reporters stayed in during the Vietnam War. Also was ground zero during the Yellow shirt-Red shirt riots.

  10. #15790
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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand




  11. #15791
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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Quote Originally Posted by Jah_rastafar_I View Post

    Was over at LOS last weekend.
    Stayed at dusit thani

    Mr Jah, i passed by Dusit Thani numerous times but i didn't have the time or the mood to check it out. Thanks for the photos. It looks not that modern but retains it's own class and elegance.
    Last edited by rectmobile; 12-07-2017 at 02:23 AM.

  12. #15792
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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Quote Originally Posted by rectmobile View Post
    Mr Jah, i passed by Dusit Thani numerous times but i didn't have the time or the mood to check it out. Thanks for the photos. It looks not that modern but retains it's own class and elegance.
    dusit thani is a 5 star hotel right in the heart of silom. Right next to silom mrt and a bit of a distance say 200m from saladeng BTS. It's not a new hotel obviously but pretty iconic. The rooms and the facilities were pretty ok with me when i stayed there. No complaints about it even if it looks a bit old but with so many restaurants, a nice gym, swimming pool, chill out places etc exploring the hotel is an adventure all by itself.

    Getting a hotel in thailand especially in bkk is pretty simple and cheap there are just too many accomodations available. Now with airbnb and all that traditional hotels have it harder just like how taxis have it harder with grab and uber.

    Hotels like dusit thani obviously have something that places them above other accomodation places. The restaurants, events, facilities etc like bars, etc place them above others although they have strong rivalry from hotels like intercontintal which has mixx club located in it and okura prestige which is a jap hotel and 5-6 stars and slightly newer than the rest is always priced higher than its peers.

  13. #15793
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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Quote Originally Posted by Jah_rastafar_I View Post
    dusit thani is a 5 star hotel right in the heart of silom. Right next to silom mrt and a bit of a distance say 200m from saladeng BTS. It's not a new hotel obviously but pretty iconic. The rooms and the facilities were pretty ok with me when i stayed there. No complaints about it even if it looks a bit old but with so many restaurants, a nice gym, swimming pool, chill out places etc exploring the hotel is an adventure all by itself.

    Getting a hotel in thailand especially in bkk is pretty simple and cheap there are just too many accomodations available. Now with airbnb and all that traditional hotels have it harder just like how taxis have it harder with grab and uber.

    Hotels like dusit thani obviously have something that places them above other accomodation places. The restaurants, events, facilities etc like bars, etc place them above others although they have strong rivalry from hotels like intercontintal which has mixx club located in it and okura prestige which is a jap hotel and 5-6 stars and slightly newer than the rest is always priced higher than its peers.
    Thanks for the introduction. For sure, I will check out the restaurant over there.

  14. #15794
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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Sunday is marketing day, went to market in the morning



    Saw this lady selling soon kueh. In Thailand this is known as "khanom gu chai" literally guchai kueh so whatever its inside this its also known as "khanom gu chai"



    Anyway it comes in different fillings.

    This is guchai kueh filled with chopped guchai


    This is filled with yam strips Thais call this "khanom guchai puek" puek is Thai for yam


    This is filled with bamboo shoots Thais call this "khanim guchai normai" normai is Thai for bamboo shoots


    Bought these 5 pieces - 2 guchai and 3 turnip, turnip (bangkwang) is known as munkaeo. 5 pieces for 100 baht or $4


    You may find this strange, wanton noodles in a few colours and served cold, noodles pre-cooked at home, wanton also pre-cooked, in fact nothing cooked here all done at home


    the seller will pack like this


    I asked if he have hot noodles he told me go home and microwave it, alamak!

    Had my breakfast in market, fishball noodles


    and guess what, chai tao kway


    Chai tao kway full of half cooked bean sprouts, SHIOK


    Bought tea from this guy, 35 baht a glass its quite expensive


    Got one for the maid

  15. #15795
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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Went to Bangkok's Chinatown (Yaowarat market) today to buy mushrooms and fried beancurd skins (tau-kee) to cook lor-bak





    Saw a nice wanton noodle shop






    Ordered a plate, have to say not very nice, I just came back from Hong Kong you see



    Saw a durian stall, selling only kanyao durian which is what I like, soft,. ripe, sweet



    Aunty skilful not same way Singapore seller open durian



    Came home eat with wife and maid, very shiok

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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Good rear landscape view


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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    [/QUOTE]

    What price now, Froggy. ...140b/kg? .....2 mths ago was 100b/kg.
    Thats the way they open up durian coz the very thick husk.
    I managed to smuggled some 3kg on tight-container then.

  18. #15798
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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Quote Originally Posted by melzp View Post
    What price now, Froggy. ...140b/kg? .....2 mths ago was 100b/kg.
    Thats the way they open up durian coz the very thick husk.
    I managed to smuggled some 3kg on tight-container then.
    Montong durian was going for 80-100 baht/kg last month now what I saw on the streets was like 150.

    Dirian I bought is not mongtong, it's kanyao, generally much more expensive compare to mongtong. My durian yesterday was 350 baht/kg which is considered inexpensive cos I've bought kanyao at 750 baht/kg before

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    Went Thonglor last night to a Japanese restaurant Nagiya, seems like we're the only non-Japanese in the restaurant (besides the waitresses there), so we must be in the right restaurant.







    There are 3 floors to this restaurant

    Cherry is quite pretty





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    Default Re: A Singaporean's guide to living in Thailand

    Nimbles









    Chicken


    Great beef




    Stomach
    Last edited by Froggy; 18-07-2017 at 12:29 AM.

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