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Windsor
31-08-2011, 06:46 PM
In conjunction with the "Speak Good English Movement," which will be launch on 10th September, 2011, I am posting this to further improve our English.

Don't abbrev.
Check to see if you any words out.
Be carefully to use adjectives and adverbs correct.
About sentence fragments.
When dangling, don't use participles.
Don't use no double negatives.
Each pronoun agrees with their antecedent.
Just between You and i, case is important.
Join clauses good, like a conjunction should.
Don't use commas, that aren't necessary.
Its important to use apostrophe's right.
It's better not to unnecessarily split an infinitive.
Never leave a transitive verb just lay there without an object.
Only Proper Nouns should be capitalized.
Also a sentence should begin with a capital and end with a period.
Use hyphens in compound-words, not just in any two-word phrase.
In letters compositions reports and things like that we use commas to keep a string of items apart.
Watch out for irregular verbs which have creeped into our language.
Verbs has to agree with their subjects.
Avoid unnecessary redundancy.
A writer mustn't shift your point of view.
Don't write a run-on sentence you've got to punctuate it.
A preposition isn't a good thing to end a sentence with.
Avoid clichés like the plague.

:D :D :D

Ramseth
31-08-2011, 07:05 PM
In view of the present circumstances and what has transpired and has been transacted, agreed upon and settled in the past, there seems to be no cause for alarm to call in the senior management or the board of directors as these figures are in line or more or less along the line of general market performances and expectations in these conditions whereby international trading and shipping incur higher costs while businesses just like us have to bear with it along with the others and of course, with the inadvertent interim fluctuation in our share prices in the stockmarket that I'm sure that our shareholders will bear with it the meantime for the long-term returns and our directors will understand it and direct our executives and managers as to to the future direction of the company and as such, our outlook is cautiously optimistic on the side of rosy.

Count the words and count the number of period. Explain the meaning.

Equalisation
01-09-2011, 03:24 AM
In view of the present circumstances and what has transpired and has been transacted, agreed upon and settled in the past, there seems to be no cause for alarm to call in the senior management or the board of directors as these figures are in line or more or less along the line of general market performances and expectations in these conditions whereby international trading and shipping incur higher costs while businesses just like us have to bear with it along with the others and of course, with the inadvertent interim fluctuation in our share prices in the stockmarket that I'm sure that our shareholders will bear with it the meantime for the long-term returns and our directors will understand it and direct our executives and managers as to to the future direction of the company and as such, our outlook is cautiously optimistic on the side of rosy.

Count the words and count the number of period. Explain the meaning.

Eh kawan,

Lu sembayang ... lost the chicken ah ??:o:D:D

kingrant
01-09-2011, 03:33 AM
From Temasek Holdings or GIC?If cannot convince, confound. If cannot confound, confuse.
In view of the present circumstances and what has transpired and has been transacted, agreed upon and settled in the past, there seems to be no cause for alarm to call in the senior management or the board of directors as these figures are in line or more or less along the line of general market performances and expectations in these conditions whereby international trading and shipping incur higher costs while businesses just like us have to bear with it along with the others and of course, with the inadvertent interim fluctuation in our share prices in the stockmarket that I'm sure that our shareholders will bear with it the meantime for the long-term returns and our directors will understand it and direct our executives and managers as to to the future direction of the company and as such, our outlook is cautiously optimistic on the side of rosy.Count the words and count the number of period. Explain the meaning.

Agoraphobic
01-09-2011, 04:41 AM
In conjunction with the "Speak Good English Movement," which will be launch on 10th September, 2011, I am posting this to further improve our English.

Don't abbrev.
Check to see if you any words out................
:D :D :D

Windsor, its "Speak Good Engris Moevement," not "Write Good English Movement."

Cheers!

Windsor
01-09-2011, 05:54 AM
Windsor, its "Speak Good Engris Moevement," not "Write Good English Movement."

Cheers!

I know...but writing good Engrish is also important.:D

mojito
01-09-2011, 06:06 AM
...

Count the words and count the number of period. Explain the meaning.

Translated in my head:
"Even though the sea has evaporated into super cumulonimbus cloud formations blocking sunlight from reaching the atmosphere and the demons are crawling out from the underworld feasting on our children for supper, I'm sure if we can pretend nothing has changed and continue doing what we do best - nothing." :mad:

HedgeTrader
01-09-2011, 08:50 AM
In view of the present circumstances and what has transpired and has been transacted, agreed upon and settled in the past, there seems to be no cause for alarm to call in the senior management or the board of directors as these figures are in line or more or less along the line of general market performances and expectations in these conditions whereby international trading and shipping incur higher costs while businesses just like us have to bear with it along with the others and of course, with the inadvertent interim fluctuation in our share prices in the stockmarket that I'm sure that our shareholders will bear with it the meantime for the long-term returns and our directors will understand it and direct our executives and managers as to to the future direction of the company and as such, our outlook is cautiously optimistic on the side of rosy.

Count the words and count the number of period. Explain the meaning.

LOL one sentence and one period. Sorry not so free to count the words. This is what? Guinness record for longest sentence in the world? The meaning is of course meaningless. Everyday heard from CNA market reports also same drivel. Only their sentence not so long, otherwise the half-fucked English CNA reporters all die LOL

Leongsam
01-09-2011, 08:54 AM
http://www.davidbarrow.com/pbr/

You may already be aware of my role and involvement in the area of directing divergent information channels as long as long-term salability grows exponentially toward the statistical horizon.

A secret passion of mine is looking into staggered venture capital financing as a regenerative move while reasonable resource allocation stimulates my specific advancement criteria.

I often speak out quite passionately about the subject of facilitating executive social networking as a transitional cooling off period before job security leads to a convergence of multiple technologies.

As a lifelong student of synergistic interactions, I'm sure you can appreciate the various implications of looking into staggered venture capital financing as a preliminary step before customer satisfaction leads the pack in market innovation.

You may have already seen or heard this in the various media outlets, but I'm facilitating executive social networking during the critical time period immediately before the primary win-win relationship rises to the surface in a sea of ever-shifting credibility.

While presenting at a symposium on industrial cross-capitalization, I came to the realization we should begin the process of allocating scarce resource scenarios as long as profit scalability grows exponentially toward the statistical horizon.

My ultimate goal in this situation is integrating executive security measures such that high success probability revolves around a stability point.
I'm establishing active directions in the area of activating ground floor entry points as a technique of experiencing quantum holistic change while the time_spent to resultant_productivity ratio grows exponentially toward the statistical horizon.

Please keep this to yourself, but I have a special knack for allocating scarce resource scenarios as a protective measure for the day when maximum opportunity leads to a convergence of multiple technologies.

I'm establishing active directions in the area of entering profitable consulting situations while component cost inter-dependency invigorates executive responsibility.

Keep this to yourself, but I'm currently leading a group of top-level researchers with the purpose of looking into methods of providing maximum customer interaction as long as continuously variable response potential stabilizes in my statistical projections.

I've refocused a substantial percentage of my extensive wisdom and experience on studying the effects of disproportionate access restrictions during a self-examination stage after the time_spent to resultant_productivity ratio becomes the prevailing consumer outlook.

Windsor
01-09-2011, 01:13 PM
Some people like to be bombastic and use words that are comprehensible only to a few. Reminds me of an army officer who was fond of using words he barely understand. I recall him telling some of us, "The date is not confirmed as it is not tentative." I laughed to myself and wondered whether the other officers knew what he was actually saying.

Ramseth
01-09-2011, 02:07 PM
English grammar is meaningless once you've mastered the basics. Breaking English grammatical rules and still sound grammatically correct is the next level to attain. Shakespeare himself broke so many medieval grammatical rules that he set the standards even higher in the use of language (English) as a medium of expression.

For example, in school, if you wrote "the stars are bright" you'd be marked right. But, if you wrote "bright are the stars" you'd be marked wrong. However in the real world, "bright are the stars" sound far more poetic and classy. Learn the basics in school and follow the rules to get your marks. Out of school, anything goes to your heart's content only limited by your imagination and creativity. Language, whether English or other, is fluid ever evolving.

And, in my example, are you supposed to start a sentence with a conjunction ("but" / "and")? ;)

Windsor
01-09-2011, 04:10 PM
And, in my example, are you supposed to start a sentence with a conjunction ("but" / "and")? ;)

I believe if the conjunction is a complete sentence then it should be fine, but not if it is a fragment.

Ramseth
01-09-2011, 04:24 PM
I believe if the conjunction is a complete sentence then it should be fine, but not if it is a fragment.

Exactly! It's up to what you believe, see, hear, read or prefer. If you're part of the majority, your preference will become standard grammar in time. There's no English grammar god passing commandments that pass tense shall end with -ed, continuous tense shall end with -ing etc. I've said, language is fluid evolutionary.

Khun Ying Pojaman
01-09-2011, 05:04 PM
In conjunction with the "Speak Good English Movement," which will be launch on 10th September, 2011, I am posting this to further improve our English.


:oIo::oIo::oIo:

Windsor
01-09-2011, 05:34 PM
How embarrassing, you are right. It should be "In conjunction with the "Speak Good English Movement," which will be launched on 10th September, 2011, I am posting this to further improve our English." Accept my deepest apology.:o

kingrant
01-09-2011, 07:00 PM
In "Politics and the English Language", Orwell provides six rules for writers:

Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.

Never use a long word where a short one will do.If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.

Never use the passive where you can use the active.

Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.

Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.

—George Orwell, Politics and the English Language, Horizon, April 1946

He also advised against saying:

The not unbrown fox chased the not unwhite rabbit across the not ungreen field.

Forvendet
02-09-2011, 08:31 AM
He also advised against saying:

The not unbrown fox chased the not unwhite rabbit across the not ungreen field.

It's not uncommon to be not unambigious. :D